One Hunting Rifle - 30'06 7mm Rem Mag or 300 Win Mag? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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duncan
09-20-2002, 15:53
If you could only have one hunting rifle for the lower 48, which would it be?

Around here, I can actually get a moose hunt in. But folks only get one or two moose tags in their lifetime.

Many deer, elk, and hog hunting.

marvin
09-20-2002, 16:38
get the -06 keep your shots under 300 yards and you'll do find.

slick slidestop
09-20-2002, 16:57
All three are fine, but I would get the 7MM or 300 Win Mags

TScottW99
09-20-2002, 17:16
If I could only have one it would be the 30-06. It's a classic cartridge that is very versatile.

glockshootist
09-20-2002, 18:07
Originally posted by TScottW99
If I could only have one it would be the 30-06. It's a classic cartridge that is very versatile.


And you can find ammo for it virtually anyplace ammo is sold. It's a great all-around cartridge capable of adequately taking any game in the lower 48.

glock_19guy1983
09-20-2002, 18:11
I would go with the 06 or the 7mm mag 300 win mag is a little big for whitetail

mpol777
09-20-2002, 18:39
.30-06 was my choice when 1 hunting rifle was all i could afford. i still love it, but now that i have a bit more jing i'm buying rifles for specific game. my goals is to aquire this list for hunting.


rabbits: .22lr - got it
small predators (coyote, bobcat, fox, etc): .22-250 - got it
white tail: .243 to .270 something in this realm
elk: .338-06
black bear: .45-70
cape buffalo: .500 NE (hey it could happen ;f)

there are a few other calibers i want for differnt game, but the greatest part is until i get any of these i can always use my .30-06. with a selection of 110gr to 200gr i'm covered.

lmaynard
09-20-2002, 22:20
Well, all of these are good calibers, but if I could have only one :( , I'd get the 30-06. It's really versatile. First, one assumption. Most hunting shots happen under 200 yards.

The 7mm shoots flatter than the 30-06, but doesn't (to my knowledge, someone will correct me here if I'm wrong ;) ) have the heavier bullets like the 220 grain, which is about the minimum I would use for moose. WIth the 30-06, you can also use smaller bullets, down to 110 grain, to get a lighter load for varmint hunting. The 180 grain is good for both elk and deer. With some of the newer powders the 30-06 is creeping up on the 7MM too.

The 300 is a marvelous cartridge! I can't say enough about it. It shoots farther accurately than either the 7MM or the 30-06 (personal opinion, please no flames ;l ), and its great for moose and elk. But, it kicks significantly harder than the 30-06, is more expensive to shoot, and perhaps most importantly, tears up more meat when used on smaller than elk sized thin skinned game.

The 30-06, although in most rifles NOT a tack driver, is an accurate hunting cartridge that you can get in almost any store that stocks ammo anywhere in the 48 states or Alaska, and its chambered in pretty well any brand and/or model you can think of, virtually assuring that you will find it in a rifle that you just can't stand leaving the store without ;3.

So, for me :cool:,

if I shot more prairie dogs, I'd get the 7MM,
if I shot more moose and elk, I'd get the 300,
if I shot most anything anytime I could, I'd get the 30-06.

Hope this helps.

fajizzle nizzle
09-20-2002, 23:22
Will you be hunting hogs in Washington?

vart
09-21-2002, 01:31
Originally posted by lmaynard
The 30-06, although in most rifles NOT a tack driver
I think my dad, a former Marine Corps sniper, USMC pistol team member, and former instructor at the USMC/Army sniper school would disagree. He swears by the .30-06 and says it is extremely accurate. I have a stock Ruger M77 in .30-06 that shoots 1/2" groups with Federal Classic 150 gr. $11.00 a box cartridges.
I also disagree that the .30-06 is inadequate for Moose. Moose are fairly thin-skinned and are regularly taken with .270s.
Heck, I shot my first elk with a .257 Roberts and 120 gr. Noslers at 300 yds. Shot placement is emminently more important than caliber. Gut shoot an elk with a 300 Win Mag and he will run just as far as an elk gut shot with a 30-30.

Kilgor
09-21-2002, 10:34
How about you look for a good used bolt action (Rem. 700, Win. 70, Browning, A-bolt, etc.) that is an excellent deal and save some money. Then be satisfied with whichever of these calibers it is in because they will all do the job well.

If you have the cash for a new gun and are picking based soley on caliber, then I say none of these.

Get a good short action in .300 WSM.

-Uses .30 caliber bullets, which I like better than 7mm.
-Moving as fast as the .300 win. mag. and faster than the 06.
-Close to the same kick as an 06 and less than a .300 win. mag. due to the use of about 15 grains of powder less than the .300 win. mag.
-I know you're a reloader so the powder savings helps (more efficient).
-I know you're a reloader so the extra cost of factory ammo over the 06 doesn't matter.
-Short action gun, lighter and more compact w/ a shorter bolt throw.

Kilgor

lmaynard
09-21-2002, 14:01
I think my dad, a former Marine Corps sniper, USMC pistol team member, and former instructor at the USMC/Army sniper school would disagree. He swears by the .30-06 and says it is extremely accurate. I have a stock Ruger M77 in .30-06 that shoots 1/2" groups with Federal Classic 150 gr. $11.00 a box cartridges.
I also disagree that the .30-06 is inadequate for Moose. Moose are fairly thin-skinned and are regularly taken with .270s.
Heck, I shot my first elk with a .257 Roberts and 120 gr. Noslers at 300 yds. Shot placement is emminently more important than caliber. Gut shoot an elk with a 300 Win Mag and he will run just as far as an elk gut shot with a 30-30.


Vart, peace friend ;K

He very well might disagree, and with some reason. This is a very gray area and somewhat of a religious issue with many people. We may have to agree to disagree here. I myself have an SR60 in 30-06 that prints under .25 MOA up to 400 (this particular load gets wonky after 550 for some reason) with handloads, and I wouldn't think of gettng rid of it. But I wouldn't expect that accuracy, or the .5 MOA you're getting, out of most, or even many, of the 30-06s out there. And have you seen the Ed Brown marine sniper? Oh my, if I could just figure out how to justify it to myself ;l.

Is it harder to shoot sub .5 MOA groups with a 30-06 vs. another caliber? Yep, I believe so, perhaps due to the case shape on the 30-06 more than anything else, but that doesn't mean its impossible to do. Here's an interesting article that compares the 30-06 to the 308:

http://www.snipercountry.com/Articles/AccuracyFacts.htm

That said. Does it matter for hunting? No. ~1 MOA at hunting ranges appears to be more than adequate and better than most people can shoot under field conditions anyway. Are there any 1000 yard match competitors using the 30-06? Not to my knowledge. I'd love to hear about it if there are.

That lack may be due to a perception of 30-06 inaccuracy based more on the number of different rifles (of significantly different qualities) that have been chambered for this round. I just don't know.

I have seen two 30-06 M77s side by side with the same optics turn in both good and bad accuracy on the same range at the same day with the same shooter using the same loads. Don't know if its some kind of karma thing, or the so-called Ruger barrel quality issue, but its really there. I think if you get a sweet shooter in any cartridge, then you've just lucked out and should recognize it.

I didn't say the 30-06 was inadequate for moose. I did say that I'd use the 220 grain bullet on moose and that that is about the minimum bullet weight I'd use. I like heavier bullets than you do, that's personal opinion also. I like as much terminal energy as I can get without unduly tearing up meat, so I use the heavier bullets unless they're just too big for the game. As you point out, a bad shot is a bad shot, and shot placement is critical no matter the cartridge or bullet weight.

Don't want to start a flame war here, but this is actually fascinating stuff and I've never fully understood why different people have such different opinions of the tactical accuracy of the 06. Again, I don't think anyone can argue with the hunting capabilities of this cartridge. Suffice it to say that there are different opinions. I've always toyed with the idea of working up an 06 for 1000 yard light rifle, just to prove it to myself one way or another. Hey, maybe that's the reason I need that Ed Brown ;f. Now if the wife will only buy that reasoning............

vart
09-21-2002, 21:53
I guess I forgot to use those dang smilies to let you know that I wasn't upset;f .
I actually have pretty limited experience with rifle cartridges. I shot my first deer with a .243 (it dropped it first shot), my second one, along with a few more deer, an antelope and my first elk with a .257 Roberts (dropped them all first shot). I got the Ruger last year in .30-06, and a Pre-64 custom Winchester in .35 Whelen a couple years ago.
I simply note bullet drop and accuracy of the different rifles and cartridges. They have all performed well on whatever particular animal I was hunting.
My dad, however, IS the expert. He is a professional big-game hunter with many African safaris under his belt, a couple of "Grand Slams", has hunted dozens of times in Alaska, is in Canada right now on a moose hunt (he's using a custom .35 Whelen with 250 gr. bullets, ironiclly), and has authored numerous articles in different hunting publications.
I am ill-equipped to carry on a well-informed debate on hunting rifles since my knowledge is rather limited to only what I have experienced.
Please don't engage me in a flame war, I would likely get toasted;) .

lmaynard
09-21-2002, 22:48
Vart, no problem, no flames here ;J. I bow out about the time things go like that. Life is too short to waste time on those things.

It really doesn't sound like you speak from lack of experience though. It sounds like you learned good things and have used them well. I wish I could say all my meat shots were first shot downs, but I can't :(. That is something to be very proud of. I'm envious.

Heck, I'd like to get together and go shooting with you sometime. I'm not far from you, and horse pack up there sometimes. I'll hopefully be up there in May training a new string. It would be cool to get together with you and your dad for some shooting. Especially that 35, wow! Life is so short, and my job is really interfering with my hobbies ;i.

mattyk6
09-22-2002, 01:31
As another Washatonian, I recommend the '06. My father's been hunting with one for almost 40 yrs, only 2 different rifles over all that time. For the last 14 yrs (started hunting at 10), I have been using a '06. Been successfuly at 300+ yd shots, even as close at 25 yds (the deer just kept walking closer and closer). It's nice to have to be shooting the same cartridge as your hunting partner. Just after the morning walk, my dad and I got back in the truck, just as we were getting ready to leave, a deer walked out. In the heat of the moment, I grabbed my dad's rifle!

BTW, my mom carries a .308. Just a little less kick for her.

Good Luck!

duncan
09-22-2002, 02:48
Sounds like a Rem 700 in 30'06 then.

And the hogs are south of Olympic National forest in western wa but you have to find them! Yes, the '06 would be used on them too!

what
09-22-2002, 07:15
I will tell you what my father told me when I first started thinking about my first deer rifle. Get a 300 winchester magnum. I have used everything that was mentioned here 7mm, 30-06 and my personal favorite 300 winchester magnum. I asked him if a 300 kicks pretty good and he says yes, but if you are any type of rifleman you can teach your self to ignore the recoil. Also if you ever decide to hunt anything bigger you already have the right rifle. If you ever go after elk or black bear you have the perfect cartridge. You might hear some people say that the 300 is overkill for deer, but dead is dead. You get all the same choices in bullet size as a 30-06 with extra power.
I took that smart mans advise and got the 300 and I could not be happier. It will easily shoot to .39 minute of angle and in my opinion it does not kick your hard and does not tear up a bunch of meat (you may loose one hambuger) big deal. In my opinion it beats having to track after you game.

SkippyThe
09-22-2002, 09:55
I would go with the 7mm. I used a 7mm for alot of hunting around Eastern Wa. and was well armed for anything that I was hunting. I have a friend that has custom loads for anything you could ever want to hunt with a 7mm. I'll get another one sometime most likely a Ruger no.1. ST

smeet5150
09-22-2002, 10:23
the 30.06 is more than I'll ever need for anything in my area.

WalterGA
09-22-2002, 10:25
Well, understanding that this is purely hypothetical, as a man of Duncan's means can well afford more than one rifle, but if I had to own only one rifle for hunting in the lower 48, it'd be a .308. Short action; deadly accurate; less recoil than any of the calibers mentioned and actually fun to shoot. Brass, etc., readily available and cheap.

(PLUS, you can use your AA2200 for .308 reloading!)

So WalterGA - if deer, elk, hog are my main game, what rifle specifically do you recommend in .308? Rem 700? What?

tjpet
09-22-2002, 10:50
I'd have to go with the 30/06. The mags will hit harder farther out but not many shooters are capable of fully utilizing their advantages in the field.

The .308 is a great SA caliber. But if used in a bolt gun with a reloading owner the '06 is more versatile as to velocity and bullet weight when taking into consideration all North American BG species.

WalterGA
09-22-2002, 12:00
I suppose the pertinent question would not be which caliber will comfortably handle any North American game, but rather does Duncan plan to hunt any North American game that a .308 won't comfortably handle???

fajizzle nizzle
09-22-2002, 15:33
Originally posted by duncan

And the hogs are south of Olympic National forest in western wa but you have to find them! Yes, the '06 would be used on them too!

Have you personally seen any of SW Washington's hogs? Or are you going to the Wynoochee drainage based on what you've read in the Fishing and Hunting News? I'm just curious because I've read the reports of hogs in that area but I have yet to hear any credible reports of anybody killing one. They are in some of western Washington's finest brush and I wonder how big the population really is. If you've already hunted them successfully then I'd love to see some pics.
Have you drawn a moose permit yet? The permits available per GMU range from 1 to 22 and last year's applications per GMU ranged from 634 to 7,304. Not impossible, but not great odds. A moose hunt in BC is very attainable on the other hand.

edit: I'd choose the '06 just cuz.

Fox
09-22-2002, 23:18
One rifle for big game?

.30-06 as one can buy ammo anywhere.

duncan
09-22-2002, 23:32
I have not been able to get out to hunt those hogs.

I've got some good intel on them. Hear some of the local sporting good shops around Aberdeen can point you in the right direction.

Dept of Wildlife told me they had reports of about 50 hogs being taken around the Olympic Natl Par over the past two years.

And the Indians on the Reservation around there apparently hunt the hogs quietly.

I'd like to hunt the hogs. Some folks at Boeing went out there a while ago and tracked them but couldn't get any shots off - the buggers were fast and they only caught a fast glimpse of their hairy butts.

Email me off line if you'd like to get some GT folks and do the research and try to get some 100 pounders for ham, bacon, and sausage.

But right now I'm focused on deer season coming up for modern firearms around Oct 15th.

That's why I'm thinking about a bolt action rifle. My problem is deer, elk, and hog are all I'll probably hunt around WA.

ithaca_deerslayer
09-23-2002, 14:37
The .30-06 is the best round ever! You can't go wrong with it.

WalterGA is right about the .308, too. For just a little less power, the .308 offers just a little less recoil.

As to accuracy. I think any of you are crazy to think that any of your or any of me can shoot well enough to actually notice the difference in accuracy between a .30-06 and .308. Any differences we notice will be due to the particular rifle, not the round.

The 06 used to hold all the records, didn't it? The US adopted the .308, and whata you know, people began shooting that and set records with that round. Doesn't mean the older round was bad, just wasn't current. Theoretically, yes, a shorter case has the edge for accuracy. But realistically, Joe Smoe ain't gonna know the difference. The larger powder capacity, however, for bigger bullets in the .30-06 is real.

WalterGA
09-23-2002, 16:03
duncan: You confused me when you edited my post...

Understanding that duncan is probably as parsinomous as I, I'd think the .308's smaller case capacity would be attractive to him, as he'd not have to use as much of his 2200 powder. I don't think dunc would have any problems dropping any of the game that he's mentioned, using a .308.



Sorry for accidently editing your post WalterGA! Hit the wrong button again. Glad I'm not at the range today.

Made grab my dictionary on parsimony.

You're right, I am frugal when given the chance!

OMEGA5
09-23-2002, 16:42
Go with the ought 6. No matter where you hunt in this world, you can find ammo for a 30.06. It may be left over from WWWII or Korea, but you can find .06 ammo nearly anywhere you could ever hunt. Not only that, the 220gr round is potent enough for nearly anything other than Africa's BIG game.

Kilgor
09-23-2002, 17:57
Originally posted by WalterGA
Dunc, if you want to shoot whatever you decide on a lot, then you ought to shoot a lightweight 30-06 thirty or forty times in one session, then take a good look at your shoulder. It won't be a pretty sight.

You guys make me feel like I'm a He-man... The .30-06 doesn't kick hard at all in my opinion. This is shooting a synthetic stocked 700 w/ sporter weight barrel.

I think recoil with a 30-06 is grossly overestimated.

vart
09-23-2002, 20:47
Originally posted by Kilgor


You guys make me feel like I'm a He-man... The .30-06 doesn't kick hard at all in my opinion. This is shooting a synthetic stocked 700 w/ sporter weight barrel.

I think recoil with a 30-06 is grossly overestimated.
I have a 20% disability in my right shoulder (bursitis), so I looked for a mild recoil rifle that would take down an elk. My dad advised me to go with the .30-06 and 180 gr. bullets. however, I ignored his advice for getting a heavier gun with the wood stock and got the Ruger M77 All-Weather-Rifle with the stainless finish and composite stock. I shoot 150 gr. bullets for deer and really don't notice the recoil.

MrMunster
09-24-2002, 06:53
Duncan-

I know you were more interested in the caliber question, but I wanted to respond to your choice of weapons.

For the type of deer hunting I do with a rifle, the Rem 7400 makes more sense. Being able to get off a second shot quickly can be very handy.

Although it will probably never give you .25MOA, it will more than likely give you 1.5MOA which should be good enough for shots under 300yds.

Another cartridge you might consider is the .270 Win (NOT WSM, unless you want it). With correct shot placement and a heavy bullet, it should bring down the animals you mentioned.

Weaps
09-24-2002, 07:40
I would go with the .30-06 because it can take out any North American game in the lower 48 states, including 600-800lb <b>African lions.</b> Apparently, according to <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2002/US/South/09/23/lions.killed.ap/index.html">this link</a>, African lions are lower 48 game.

;f

Fox
09-24-2002, 11:13
Originally posted by OMEGA5
Go with the ought 6. No matter where you hunt in this world, you can find ammo for a 30.06. It may be left over from WWWII or Korea, but you can find .06 ammo nearly anywhere you could ever hunt. Not only that, the 220gr round is potent enough for nearly anything other than Africa's BIG game.

Agreed. You can find .30-06 cartridges anywhere that sells ammunition.

duncan
09-24-2002, 11:27
Lots of good advice and I'm more confused than ever.

No I'm okay.

I'll look for a used Rem 700 or a Tikka in 06 or 308 whichever I can get a good deal on!

Michigun
09-24-2002, 11:43
Originally posted by glock_19guy1983
300 win mag is a little big for whitetail

There is no such thing as "over-kill", only "under-kill"...

If you hit them where they’re supposed to, "meat loss" is a non-issue.

If ammo availability & cost (something tells me you'll be re-loading for it anyways.:)) isn't a factor, then why not go with a 300 Mag? Heck, I say skip them all & go right for the Remington 338 Ultra Mag!:)

One thing I’ll add that you hadn’t asked about is: Buy a “blued” gun. On average, stainless steel guns are less accurate then “blued” guns. It’s a “metal thing”.

Kilgor
09-24-2002, 14:17
On average, stainless steel guns are less accurate then “blued” guns. It’s a “metal thing”.

Then why are most matchgrade barrels stainless steel?

Arbee
09-24-2002, 14:55
Check out my thread about the Beretta Mato in the GT High Power Forum. A new gun that was discontinued...you probably could just keep the action (designed by Dakota) and have a gun built around it and come out okay, though it's still not cheap. Anyway, it's available in some of the calibers you are interested in.

WalterGA
09-24-2002, 15:14
While I generally agree with Michigan on most subjects, I think he's just a little "out to lunch" on this subject.

Whitetails hereabouts run up to around 275#. We don't have elk, but we do have lots of deer and hogs. A well-placed shot with a .243 will bring down any Whitetail in the lower 48. I get a kick out of seeing those guys (including one of my best hunting buddies) "enjoying" sighting in their .300 mags every deer season. Most shots around here are under 100 yds.

I don't have any animus towards .30-06, and I don't think the recoil of a .30-06 is even noticable in the field; however, if you're going to do a lot of shooting from the bench, use a light rifle, and don't weigh 300#, then you're going to not be happy with most of the long-action calibers.

I've had the opportunity to fire most rifle calibers out at our local range, as I spend more time at our local range than anybody else. I don't claim to be a rifle expert, but am just passing along observations. The babble about African hunts, etc., are irrelevant to the question posted by duncan. Having communicated quite a bit with duncan and observed some of his shooting habits from a distance, I'd be inclined to think that he'd want to spend a lot of time at the bench, working up accurate reloads, ergo, my recommendation for the .308. Of course, a 30-06 is a good round for taking any North American game. Back to the pertinent question: How's duncan going to be using his rifle, and what are his shooting habits?? He'll never feel the recoil of a large caliber rifle in the field. He'll darn well feel it if he shoots much off a bench, if he's shooting a lightweight rifle.

mpol777
09-24-2002, 15:28
Originally posted by WalterGA
He'll never feel the recoil of a large caliber rifle in the field. He'll darn well feel it if he shoots much off a bench, if he's shooting a lightweight rifle.

agreed. felt recoil is all in your head. when you have the crosshairs on an animal in the field there's too much going on in your head to feel the thump.

fastvfr
09-24-2002, 16:27
I like 130 grain JSP Partition .270 Win handloads through my M70 Black Shadow for anything over 200#.

And the .277 cal 150 gr Barnes X handloads for anything over 400#.

I will probably never upgrade unless I go after moose or grizzlies...then it'll be either a .338 WSM or the venerable .375 H&H Magnum.

I have never owned, nor do I intend to own, any of the 3 listed calibers that started this thread...but there are some fine rifles chambered for them. Just personal preference.

I just know what works for me...and most of my buddies that I go to the range with have sold or traded their .300 and &MM mags in when they see what the old '06 case will do when properly necked down! Especially in a rifle that cost $299 new at Wally-World...WITH scope, rings, and bases included!

Regards,

FastVFR

mattyk6
09-24-2002, 17:47
Originally posted by WalterGA
Whitetails hereabouts run up to around 275#.

Holy Cow! 275lbs is a decent sized Elk up here in Washington. Most deer run about 125 - 175 lbs.

Duncan - where 'bouts you gonna be hunting? I won't tell anyone! ;)

Kilgor
09-24-2002, 19:08
if you're going to do a lot of shooting from the bench, use a light rifle, and don't weigh 300#, then you're going to not be happy with most of the long-action calibers.

I weigh 140 lbs and shot 50 rounds working up a load with Hornady's 165 grain SST for a synthetic stocked Remington 700 w/ sporter weight barrel. I would have shot more, but the barrel heats up quickly and requires time to cool between shots.

I completely disagree with the statement that the 30-06 kicks hard from a bench as long as the gun fits the shooter.

I also have a hard time believing that Georgia's deer are twice the size of deer here in Arkansas given the similar terrain and latitude.

I did a little checking and what I found showed that deer in Georgia more typically average about 120-150 lbs. on the hoof. This will vary slightly by region and food availability, but not by over 100 pounds!

http://www.stewart.army.mil/dpw/wildlife/the%20kill.htm

Data from Ft. Stewart Georgia last season:

1.5 YEAR OLD BUCKS:

Avg. Field Dressed Weight: 71.6 lbs.
Avg. # Points: 2.9
Avg. Antler Beam Length: 6.1"

2.5 YEAR OLD & OLDER BUCKS:

Avg. Field Dressed Weight: 93.6 lbs.
Avg. # Points: 6.7
Avg. Antler Beam Length: 14.3"

Not trying to be contrary here, but I disagree on these two issues.

;) Kilgor

WalterGA
09-24-2002, 20:01
The first opinion is just a matter of personal preference and observation.

The second "opinion" is simply incorrect. I didn't make any statements about average deer kills in GA. I personally know of deer being killed in the 250-275# range. I doubt that Arkansas has the same row crop, water and woods combination that we experience in S. GA. I'm sure that you're several hundred miles north of here.

Michigun
09-25-2002, 06:14
Originally posted by Kilgor
Then why are most matchgrade barrels stainless steel?

"Match-grade" isn't in the same boat as a standard "mass-manufactured" stainless steel barreled gun. That & I said "on average"... there are exceptions to every rule.

Originally posted by WalterGA
While I generally agree with Michigan on most subjects, I think he's just a little "out to lunch" on this subject.

Was there something about my 1st “post” that was misleading?

I guess I should tell you that my “post” should have been read in 3 parts, because each part has nothing really to do with the other.

(Part 1) My statement of; “There is no such thing as "over-kill", only "under-kill"... If you hit them where they’re supposed to, "meat loss" is a non-issue.” was only a response to glock_19guy1983’s “post”. Heck, you’d be hard pressed, on average, to find anything more “over-kill” then a 12 gauge for whitetails!

(Part 2) My statement of; “If ammo availability & cost (something tells me you'll be re-loading for it anyways.:)) isn't a factor, then why not go with a 300 Mag? Heck, I say skip them all & go right for the Remington 338 Ultra Mag!:)” was only to be taken lightly. I added “smiley faces”, what more do you want?;f

(Part 3) My statement of; “One thing I’ll add that you hadn’t asked about is: Buy a “blued” gun. On average, stainless steel guns are less accurate then “blued” guns. It’s a “metal thing”.” was only to bring something up that rarely ever does.

Does this help any? I didn’t mean to make it sound as if I was saying that anything under a .50 cal. Barrett wasn’t sufficient enough for whitetail hunting. As I re-read my “post”, I could see how it may have been taken that way though.

As you may know, Michigan has just about all the records in the USA for hunters a field on any given “opening day”. I’m a HUGE hunter myself, (No, I’m not 400lbs…:)) & next to shotguns, they say that the 30-30 cartridge is the most popular here for whitetails.

Weaps
09-25-2002, 17:07
Originally posted by WalterGA

The babble about African hunts, etc., are irrelevant to the question posted by duncan. Having communicated quite a bit with duncan and observed some of his shooting habits from a distance, I'd be inclined to think that he'd want to spend a lot of time at the bench, working up accurate reloads, ergo, my recommendation for the .308. Of course, a 30-06 is a good round for taking any North American game. Back to the pertinent question: How's duncan going to be using his rifle, and what are his shooting habits?? He'll never feel the recoil of a large caliber rifle in the field. He'll darn well feel it if he shoots much off a bench, if he's shooting a lightweight rifle.

I was just joshin' folks. I think duncan is getting more than enough pertinent, interesting information regarding high-powered rifles from plenty of people who have lots of experience with them. I get pretty tired myself hearing people go on about how the .30-06/.270 (both of which I own) class of rifles are great for any North American game, but if you are going to do any <b>serious</b> big game hunting (water buffalo, dangerous cats, elephant, wooly mammoth or any other animal that is protected or extinct) that you need to get some shoulder blasting cannon that belongs on the deck of the USS New Jersey.

I'll go back to GNG now and let you folks get back to serious hunting rifle discussion.

P-990
09-27-2002, 07:57
I know it's not on the list, or very common to find, but I happen to like the little .260 Remington (6.5mm-08). Nothing in the lower 48 that I have seen makes me think I need a bigger gun. Except maybe black bears (have never run into wild pigs). Here in NH we have moose, and they're pretty sizeable. But I think the .260 would be adequate. And here in NH there are a few bucks taken that weigh in close to 200 lbs field dressed. The last deer taken by a member of my family weighed in at 160 lbs. Just my two-cents, take it for what it's worth.

Short Cut
11-10-2002, 20:00
I just answered this question for myself and bought a Browning A-bolt in .300 Win Mag with the Boss system. Then I mounted a Leupold 4-14x50 AO scope (http://www.leupold.com/products/magnified/images/Vari-X_III_4.5-14x50AOIRMx2.gif) with an illuminated Mil-dot reticle.

For me it was a choice between the 30-06 and the .300 Win Mag. They are both pretty versatile and have abundant choices of factory ammo. However the Win mag got the nod for its signifcantly greater power beyond 100 yards.

I took it to the range for the first time last week. Heading there I was excited and also unsure of just how this expensive new tool would work for me. It turned out just great and I couldn't be happier with it. The Boss makes the recoil completely manageable and after 42 rounds of Winchester 180 grain Supreme Ballistic Silvertip loads my shoulder wasn't sore and I could have readily shot more as dusk settled on the shooting range.

I was thrilled with the rifle's accuracy. Using sandbags on a bench while shooting 100 yards I was able to repeatedly put shots so tight that they shared the same hole.

I'll be taking it wild boar hunting later this month and I'm also planning a Wyoming hunting trip for next year. I'm looking forward to many years of service from this sweet rifle.


clic pic
http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/medium/1abt-stnstbosss.jpg (http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/firearms/abolt/abt_stainless_stalker_boss.htm)

Rabon
11-10-2002, 21:20
It would be a 338 Win Mag.;)

paulito
11-12-2002, 00:43
go for the .300 mag if you don't mind the kick. i know a guy who shoots one in oklahoma for deer hunting. i think it's a bit too big for an average oklahoma sized deer, 110 lbs. well, at least the ones he shoots. the .300 mag provides enough kill for a moose and not any overkill for deer. but hey, it's your money.

paulito

NDGlock
11-12-2002, 08:34
http://www.berettausa.com/customer_service/FAQS/index_query.cfm?AreaID=RIFLES

http://www.tikka.fi/rifles_6.html

http://www.gunsandammomag.com/library/beretta/beretta_twaw.html