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steve4102
05-24-2009, 06:30
I'm new to the 1911 and handguns in general. What's the best way to keep my Para 14-45 running at it's best, oil, grease or both? Right now I field strip it, clean it then give it at light coat of Montana-X-Treme gun grease. Is this OK or should I be doing something else?

Thanks
Steve

Quack
05-24-2009, 06:35
i use oil until it's broken in.
afterwards i use grease on sliding parts and oil on pivots.

gconan
05-24-2009, 13:21
Just started using these Wilson Combat products and they seem to be good!

ULTIMA-LUBETM UNIVERSAL GREASE/OIL (http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=16383&title=ULTIMA-LUBE?%20UNIVERSAL%20GREASE/OIL)

I also am trying there oil and their grease. Unfortunetly because of the ammo situation I am slowed down on comparisions.

Eyescream
05-24-2009, 14:05
I've heard enough glowing praise for Brian Eno's Slide Glide that I'm thinking of switching to it.

glocks rock
05-24-2009, 20:55
I use Mil com grease. It's water based and won't gum up in hot or cold conditions like some other grease. I put oil on barrel and on the link. Slide glide is good stuff but I don't like it on a carry gun.

deMontacute
05-24-2009, 21:07
I use Mil com grease. It's water based and won't gum up in hot or cold conditions like some other grease. I put oil on barrel and on the link. Slide glide is good stuff but I don't like it on a carry gun.
Mind explaining why?

RonS
05-25-2009, 10:29
+1 Wilson Ultima lube. I like the consistancy and I like the applicator which makes it easy to get as much or as little as I want.

MD357
05-25-2009, 10:33
Another slide glide fan here. I've used it in a 1911 that went through two 1500+ round classes for those worried about using it for carry. :supergrin:

Cobra64
05-25-2009, 12:39
I've heard enough glowing praise for Brian Eno's Slide Glide that I'm thinking of switching to it.I've been using Slide Glide for years on all my pistols' friction points. I only use gun oil on pinned springs since oil penetrates through the coils to the pin.

gconan
05-25-2009, 12:43
Mind explaining why?

Cary or Duty Pistols: (http://www.brianenos.com/pages/slide-glide.html)
Slide-Glide is a grease, so it will slow down a pistol's slide-speed (compared to oil). For carry or duty pistols, protection from wear is not an issue - 100% reliability is the most important factor. For that reason, I only recommend Slide-Glide Lite in carry or duty pistols. And even then - applied very sparingly!

glocks rock
05-25-2009, 20:08
Cary or Duty Pistols: (http://www.brianenos.com/pages/slide-glide.html)
Slide-Glide is a grease, so it will slow down a pistol's slide-speed (compared to oil). For carry or duty pistols, protection from wear is not an issue - 100% reliability is the most important factor. For that reason, I only recommend Slide-Glide Lite in carry or duty pistols. And even then - applied very sparingly!

Exactly. Slide Glide is good if you know you are going to run a lot of rounds at a class but their is diff. kinds of slide glide. One for cold and one for hot. with mill com you just need one.

Eyescream
05-25-2009, 20:27
Another slide glide fan here. I've used it in a 1911 that went through two 1500+ round classes for those worried about using it for carry. :supergrin:

I've been using Slide Glide for years on all my pistols' friction points. I only use gun oil on pinned springs since oil penetrates through the coils to the pin.

You two are chiefly at fault for convincing me to spend more money. :fist:

Cary or Duty Pistols: (http://www.brianenos.com/pages/slide-glide.html)
Slide-Glide is a grease, so it will slow down a pistol's slide-speed (compared to oil). For carry or duty pistols, protection from wear is not an issue - 100% reliability is the most important factor. For that reason, I only recommend Slide-Glide Lite in carry or duty pistols. And even then - applied very sparingly!

So it slows down the slide to what extent? What is the ideal-condition cyclic rate of a 1911 with stock-weight recoil springs?

How small are we gonna split this hair?

Exactly. Slide Glide is good if you know you are going to run a lot of rounds at a class but their is diff. kinds of slide glide. One for cold and one for hot. with mill com you just need one.

Says on the website that Slide Glide Lite is rated for 30°F and up. Sounds to me, since I live in a warm climate that rarely gets below 30° Fahrenheit, I only need one viscosity.

Cobra64
05-25-2009, 20:55
You two are chiefly at fault for convincing me to spend more money. :fist:



So it slows down the slide to what extent? What is the ideal-condition cyclic rate of a 1911 with stock-weight recoil springs?

How small are we gonna split this hair?



Says on the website that Slide Glide Lite is rated for 30°F and up. Sounds to me, since I live in a warm climate that rarely gets below 30° Fahrenheit, I only need one viscosity.Here North Carolina and it rarely goes below 30 degrees. If I'm carrying in cold weather, just my body heat keeps the gun at normal temperatures.

TW-25b dries out. I was going to throw it our but instead gave away a tube and a syringe of it to some guys at my last training class.

Eyescream
05-25-2009, 21:05
Here North Carolina and it rarely goes below 30 degrees. If I'm carrying in cold weather, just my body heat keeps the gun at normal temperatures.

TW-25b dries out. I was going to throw it our but instead gave away a tube and a syringe of it to some guys at my last training class.

That's what I'm thinking. I radiate heat anyway. I stopped using a blanket at night back in March here in East Tennessee.

MD357
05-25-2009, 22:19
I'm sorry but if you follow the instructions Enos recommends you will have no problems with slide velocity. I must say I'm going to have to repeat that for entertainment value. Unless someone has emperical data to support this?

Exactly. Slide Glide is good if you know you are going to run a lot of rounds at a class but their is diff. kinds of slide glide. One for cold and one for hot. with mill com you just need one.

Funny.... I've run the heavy almost exclusively with no problems. Local guy got me hooked on it a few years ago. He's a local instructor and goes through about 30-40K rounds a year with his 1911s.

Just curious if either of you two have had any problems with slideglide or are you speaking from assumption?

Cobra64
05-25-2009, 22:39
That's what I'm thinking. I radiate heat anyway. I stopped using a blanket at night back in March here in East Tennessee.I don't radiate as much heat as wifey does. :)

Anyway, it sounds like we're almost neighbors. Ever been to a Tactical Response class in Camden, TN? I was there almost exactly a year ago. TN is a pretty state.

Makomachine
05-26-2009, 08:33
Slide Glide goes on every gun I own. For those that have problems, you aren't doing it right. You don't need much as it stays put - unlike oil alone. I've used it on my .380 LCP - thicker than I should have - and have never had any type of failure. Great stuff...

PlasticGuy
05-26-2009, 12:39
I have used Tetra grease on my 1911's in hot weather, as well as a couple test runs with some of the higher end stuff like Slide Glide. I had good results during summer testing. I'm still using oil on my carry pistols though. It does get cold here during the winter, and I use what I know works in all weather conditions. For me, that's usually FP-10.

gconan
05-26-2009, 15:49
I'm sorry but if you follow the instructions Enos recommends you will have no problems with slide velocity. I must say I'm going to have to repeat that for entertainment value. Unless someone has emperical data to support this?


I mearly posted what Brian Enos said about his own product, from his own website. I do not dout that it is great stuff. It comes highly recommended from this forum. I want to try it. But the information I gave came from Enos himself, to answer another poster.

gconan
05-26-2009, 15:53
So it slows down the slide to what extent? What is the ideal-condition cyclic rate of a 1911 with stock-weight recoil springs?

How small are we gonna split this hair?


I have no earthly idea. I have never used it. Again, that information came from Enos site. I just copied what "he"(enos) said on his own site.

Eyescream
05-26-2009, 16:06
I don't radiate as much heat as wifey does. :)

Anyway, it sounds like we're almost neighbors. Ever been to a Tactical Response class in Camden, TN? I was there almost exactly a year ago. TN is a pretty state.

I've never been to any classes. It'd be a lot prettier state without Memphis and Dollywood (to name a couple places). :supergrin:

I have no earthly idea. I have never used it. Again, that information came from Enos site. I just copied what "he"(enos) said on his own site.
I understand. I just don't know how much of a warning like that is ass-covering on the company's part that turns into much ado about nothing once it gets to the boards.

Cobra64
05-26-2009, 20:54
Slide Glide goes on every gun I own. For those that have problems, you aren't doing it right. You don't need much as it stays put - unlike oil alone. I've used it on my .380 LCP - thicker than I should have - and have never had any type of failure. Great stuff...
A well known Sig armorer and gunsmith recommends "slather it on." Besides, you can't put on too much. If you did, once you rack the slide, the excess will be forced out from underneath the slide.

I have over 20,000 rounds through my P226ST...
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Sig%20Sauer%20Guns/Marks%20Sigs/P226/P1000564.jpg



http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Sig%20Sauer%20Guns/Marks%20Sigs/P226/P1010410.jpg



http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Sig%20Sauer%20Guns/Marks%20Sigs/P226/P1010590.jpg




.

JTB
05-26-2009, 20:57
Grease on rails, oil elswhere.

Cobra64
05-26-2009, 21:29
Grease on rails, oil elswhere.

I use it on the barrel and locking block also. Anywhere there are friction surfaces.


http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Gun%20Cleaning/P1010416.jpg



http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Gun%20Cleaning/P1010419.jpg




.

Solid Snake
05-27-2009, 09:31
i had been using this oil called gibbs http://getgibbs.com/, to lube all my friction points on my 1911. it is really slick, but i latter switched to gunzilla http://www.gunzilla.us/ here lately to clean and lube my 1911. i really like it. i want to order some slide glide, as my uncle got me hooked on it, and i always put it on my gun when he brings it. but until then, gunzilla it is.

Krigloch
05-27-2009, 23:01
so is 15W50 pretty much all you need for any pistol?

ROGER4314
06-24-2009, 22:39
Gosh, you guys get too complicated for me. Been shooting 1911A1 since 1968 and I've used only a good gun oil as lube......ever. I use a small brush to apply the oil and a short blast of compressed air to blow off the excess. If there is an obvious collection of oil.....it's too much. One of my 1911's has digested tens of thousands of rounds and is as reliable as a rock.

Bottom line here is that you can get as fussy as you want about lube but it's just not necessary.

Flash

Ol'Slabsides
06-24-2009, 22:59
Is Slide Glide the one that has the red (heavier) and white/clear (lighter) formulas? I bought a P220 Carry a while back, and the seller swears by the stuff. It came in slathered in the red version, and did great shooting at the range (in Memphis, it was summer, not winter).

I've been using WeaponShield, and I've had zero problems. Seems to make cleaning the weapon faster now that it was using previous oils.

AA#5
06-24-2009, 23:13
Just started using these Wilson Combat products and they seem to be good!

ULTIMA-LUBETM UNIVERSAL GREASE/OIL (http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=16383&title=ULTIMA-LUBE?%20UNIVERSAL%20GREASE/OIL)

I also am trying there oil and their grease. Unfortunetly because of the ammo situation I am slowed down on comparisions.

+1! That stuff is excellent. I use it on everything. My Uzi, Glocks, Sigs. I love the way it keeps everything slick even after 300 rounds.

BOGE
06-25-2009, 00:21
I use what I feel is the best CLP there is: Weapon Shield liquid. Grease is 80% oil, 5% additives, and 15% thickener.

I "lifted" this from another forum. It's by Geroge Fennell, who not only has a Ph.D. in Tribology, he makes "Weapon Shield". They are the lubrication contractor for the U.P. Railroad where obviously lubrication is very important on a multi-million dollar locomotive. He makes & sells both grease & oil, hence we can eliminate a particular bias.

There are however, reasons for using and not using grease, all of which are defined by the object being lubricated, and if oil is impractical due to various reasons, such as being able to keep the oil in a confined area without it running out, or harsh environmental conditions that would benefit the use of grease rather than oil. In lubrication theory and practice, one thing is for certain... Oil is always more desireable than grease, as grease contains thickeners that are evolved from various sources (Lithium, Aluminum, Calcium, Clay (Bentone), Sodium, Poly-Urea, and others) and induce high viscosity (which is "fluid and semi-fluid friction") which in turn is in opposition to free flow and movement.

Oil vs. Grease
There are basically two types of lubricants—oil and grease. Oil has two components: base oil and additives. The base oil is either synthetic or petroleum. Additives are blended with the base oil to give the oil certain properties such as corrosion resistance or oxidation inhibition. Metals lubricated with oil will operate faster because oil is thinner and has less resistance than grease. However, oil does not last as long as grease, so your moving parts will require more frequent lubrication.

Grease has three components: base oil, thickener, and additives. Note that oil and grease both share the components of base oil and additives. The difference between an oil and grease is that grease has a thickener. The thickener makes grease possible to retain in the areas that normally could not hold oil. Since grease is thicker than oil, it also has greater resistance, which means slower cycling and operation, especially in cooler or colder climates.

I would not, and do not, advocate it for use on auto loading pistols, wheelguns, or rifle actions, for one simple reason. It will induce friction by viscosity into the system, which is what we don't want. This added "thickness" may work fine for you if you are in a clean and hot climate, but if the temperature drops significantly, or dirt/dust/contaminants get in the mix to interfere with the tolerences of your weapon, you may find yourself up the preverbial "fecal waterway, with no means of navigation".

The only time grease is recommended on the action of a weapon, is when it is used on heavy, high cycling/highly heated automatic weaponry such as SAWs (M-240/M249s) that FN produces in Columbia, South Carolina. I know this, as FN has bought PL-10 from MPC since 1996 for that very usage.

I hope this helps.
Respectfully and with best regards,
George

ROGER4314
01-11-2010, 23:51
This is a pistol forum but the subject of grease and oil got my attention. I started shooting matches with M1 Garands and learned early on how to maintain them.

On a Garand, oil is something that is used to prevent rust. Grease is used to lubricate the moving parts. The original grease was similar to white lube and/or wheel bearing grease. Now, the best lube to use is lithium based grease used in wheel bearings on a disk brake equipped car.

Grease to use on a Glock or 1911? Oil only. No grease and no trick gun manufacturer will change my mind. Add the oil, blow the parts off with an air hose to remove excess oil and it's done.

Flash

Cobra64
01-12-2010, 01:08
I'm sorry but if you follow the instructions Enos recommends you will have no problems with slide velocity. I must say I'm going to have to repeat that for entertainment value. Unless someone has emperical data to support this?



Funny.... I've run the heavy almost exclusively with no problems. Local guy got me hooked on it a few years ago. He's a local instructor and goes through about 30-40K rounds a year with his 1911s.

Just curious if either of you two have had any problems with slideglide or are you speaking from assumption?

I've only used the medium flavor. When the temperature gets down around the mid-50s, and the gun is setting, slide velocity does decrease. In this situation, after smoothing out the Slide Glide with a brush, I just add a thin layer of gun oil on top to make it less viscous.

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Gun%20Cleaning/P1030152.jpg

MacG22
01-12-2010, 11:25
Slide glide is amazing stuff. If you use it, you'll likely be happy for the rest of your life.


I do feel compelled to offer one meaningful alternative/counter, however. From a molecular perspective, molybdenum based grease is a little better to use on metal-touching-metal parts. At least for a little while. The properties of moly will actually cause it to bond, slightly, to the metal parts for a partial permeation. This means that, for some given time, it will act as a sort of partial lubricant even when the topical stuff is gone.

One of my college professors was a molecular physicist and and gun nut, both. We used to have long talks about the science behind shooting, gun care, etc. What he would do is use a moly based grease on his metal to metal parts for a few weeks, good range session, etc. Then he would switch to Slide Glide for ease of use, etc, until he was in a situation where temperature would be an issue or an "ever few weeks a year" application of the moly grease.


For barrels, he used Moly Lube Synthetic gun oil (in the aerosol can), or a similar product. Sprays with pressure to get a good cover, and then dries and lightly bonds to the surface (can be cleaned out by running a bore snake). But it creates a dry patina that doesn't pic up mud, debris, pocket lint, etc and is something dramatically less able to retain fouling.

http://images.outdoorinteractive.net/mgen/281181_d.jpg


So I actually use all of these, now, just as I was taught. I use a moly grease every so often on metal to metal parts. I then move on the slide glide for most of the year for all of my internals. And for the barrel, I use the moly lube synthetic.

Cobra64
01-12-2010, 12:29
Slide glide is amazing stuff. If you use it, you'll likely be happy for the rest of your life.


I do feel compelled to offer one meaningful alternative/counter, however. From a molecular perspective, molybdenum based grease is a little better to use on metal-touching-metal parts. At least for a little while. The properties of moly will actually cause it to bond, slightly, to the metal parts for a partial permeation. This means that, for some given time, it will act as a sort of partial lubricant even when the topical stuff is gone.

One of my college professors was a molecular physicist and and gun nut, both. We used to have long talks about the science behind shooting, gun care, etc. What he would do is use a moly based grease on his metal to metal parts for a few weeks, good range session, etc. Then he would switch to Slide Glide for ease of use, etc, until he was in a situation where temperature would be an issue or an "ever few weeks a year" application of the moly grease.


For barrels, he used Moly Lube Synthetic gun oil (in the aerosol can), or a similar product. Sprays with pressure to get a good cover, and then dries and lightly bonds to the surface (can be cleaned out by running a bore snake). But it creates a dry patina that doesn't pic up mud, debris, pocket lint, etc and is something dramatically less able to retain fouling.

http://images.outdoorinteractive.net/mgen/281181_d.jpg


So I actually use all of these, now, just as I was taught. I use a moly grease every so often on metal to metal parts. I then move on the slide glide for most of the year for all of my internals. And for the barrel, I use the moly lube synthetic.

Excellent write-up Mac. Thanks for sharing!