What exactly is the .25 trigger job? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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MilitantBEEMER
06-05-2009, 19:05
I am new to the forum and am curious as the what exactly the .25 trigger job involves. I have seen it mentioned several times but not able to find description.

Thank you for your help.

mili

outkast23
06-05-2009, 19:07
Its when you take a polishing pad on a dremel tool and polish your connect rod on your trigger assembly. As a result you get a smoother trigger pull.

MilitantBEEMER
06-05-2009, 19:09
Its when you take a polishing pad on a dremel tool and polish your connect rod on your trigger assembly. As a result you get a smoother trigger pull.

Are there any example pictures?

I am a visual kinda guy....

Mili

curtiswr
06-05-2009, 19:10
The $0.25 Glock trigger job :cool:
(http://www.alpharubicon.com/mrpoyz/glock/)

Isaiah1412
06-05-2009, 19:12
Perhaps that thread should be stickied somewhere? Its really quite good.

MilitantBEEMER
06-05-2009, 19:17
The $0.25 Glock trigger job :cool:
(http://www.alpharubicon.com/mrpoyz/glock/)

Wow, awesome and way over my head.
"Dammit Jim i am a sales manager not a mechanic"

I will hold onto this article unti I feel alot more comftorable with my Glock and its components.

Mili

Opus109
06-05-2009, 21:15
Go to YouTube.com and put "Glock 25 cent trigger job" in the search function. There are several videos of differing levels of detail that, in my opinion, give more thorough and "visual" instructions than text with pictures. Just my $.02.

outkast23
06-05-2009, 23:13
If you really wanna get fancy you can do a 75 cent trig job! jk I dont wanna confuse you (theres no such thang)

Butch
06-05-2009, 23:49
Doing it with a Dremel tool is a good way to screw up the trigger bar and/or the firing pin too.

Quite a few people have come here over the last ten years wondering why their Glock doesn't work, or why it fires more than one shot when they pull the trigger after having done a $.25 trigger job....with a Dremel tool.


:patriot:

troy96
06-05-2009, 23:57
I use a 3 way nail buffer to do my .25 trigger jobs. Works perfectly and you dont have to worry about taking too much metal off or getting rubbing compound everywhere.

http://www.made-in-china.com/image/4f0j00dYETPyaRurqIM/3-Way-Nail-Shine.jpg

RottnJP
06-06-2009, 00:06
That's not a bad idea. I did one with the dremel, and it turned out fine, but the buffer is probably a bit more gentle.

OP, it's definitely worth doing. It turned my o.k. stock trigger on an early Gen3 G23 to a thing of beauty. (Well, the polishing plus a 3.5 lb connector)

GlockM20pwns
06-06-2009, 00:21
Thank goodness someone asked this question. I've seen it mentioned on nearly every topic discussing triggers. Very good information too!! Thanks!!

gixxer750
06-06-2009, 01:05
Will it void your glock's warranty?

Frmboybuck
06-06-2009, 10:52
Doing it with a Dremel tool is a good way to screw up the trigger bar and/or the firing pin too.

Quite a few people have come here over the last ten years wondering why their Glock doesn't work, or why it fires more than one shot when they pull the trigger after having done a $.25 trigger job....with a Dremel tool.


:patriot:

Not if you use your brain doing it. Thats why its called buffing, not grinding. If you have some wits about you, the Dremel works better than anything

JJay03
08-27-2009, 16:25
I was looking all over for this also. On a carry gun should I do the 3.5lb connector also? If so where do I get it?

sgtlmj
08-27-2009, 16:46
Google search for "25 cent trigger job". QED

jdice1980
08-27-2009, 16:51
Doing it with a Dremel tool is a good way to screw up the trigger bar and/or the firing pin too.

Quite a few people have come here over the last ten years wondering why their Glock doesn't work, or why it fires more than one shot when they pull the trigger after having done a $.25 trigger job....with a Dremel tool.


:patriot:

I think you are wasting your time trying to convince these people. It is only human nature to blame ones failings (in this case the inability to shoot properly) on some external factor (trigger) rather than address the real issue (with practice).

troy96
08-27-2009, 19:00
I think you are wasting your time trying to convince these people. It is only human nature to blame ones failings (in this case the inability to shoot properly) on some external factor (trigger) rather than address the real issue (with practice).

You obviously lost something in translation. Butch didnt say dont do the job, but dont do it with a Dremel because they take too much off.

Enhancing "perfection" is not blaming the gun.

But I dont blame you for your misunderstanding. Its only human nature to grab hold of something so you can try to feel superior and demean others thus feeling better about your own shortcomings.

Mr Thundermaker
08-27-2009, 20:21
You obviously lost something in translation. Butch didnt say dont do the job, but dont do it with a Dremel because they take too much off.

Enhancing "perfection" is not blaming the gun.

But I dont blame you for your misunderstanding. Its only human nature to grab hold of something so you can try to feel superior and demean others thus feeling better about your own shortcomings.

Game, set, match. Well played sir.

Butch
08-27-2009, 20:59
I was looking all over for this also. On a carry gun should I do the 3.5lb connector also? If so where do I get it?
No way would I advise anyone to use a 3.5 connector with a coil spring in a carry gun!


:patriot:

M5Instructor
08-28-2009, 02:01
I was looking all over for this also. On a carry gun should I do the 3.5lb connector also? If so where do I get it?

Around here all Glocks issued by the Ministry of Defense, Military and Police are all issued with the 3.5 lb connector.

You can get the original Glock connector from many online sources, try some at the top of the page or at your local gun shop.

Butch
08-28-2009, 02:26
Around here all Glocks issued by the Ministry of Defense, Military and Police are all issued with the 3.5 lb connector.

You can get the original Glock connector from many online sources, try some at the top of the page or at your local gun shop.
No liability lawyers around there huh? :)

Glock won't sell 3.5 connectors here, they only put them in the longslide 'competition' guns. The one's sold by the online sources you mention are imported by someone other than Glock, and tend to cost 10 or more times what they should.

There are at least three places here that make them though....not that they're much (if any) cheaper.


:patriot:

Evela
08-28-2009, 08:03
I've been back and forth more than once about this issue. I've done the 25 cent job (and btw the 5 cent job - using a "Kiss" 4-way fingernail buffing stick - is safer and does just fine) and did install a Glock 3.5 connector.

Yes, the trigger pull will be smoother. Yes, the middle trigger pull will be from 4.5 to 5 lbs (not a "hair trigger"). But yes too - any mods you make from stock from stock, especially the 3.5 lb connector - will absolutely be jumped on by any prosecutor or civil liablity attorney worth his/her salt.

Instead of focusing on why you feared for your life, the jury will be treated to why you thought you do some self-help gunsmithing and why you decided to put in a connector that the manufacturer recommends against.

As Mas Ayoob says, from a liability standpoint, smoothing is fine. Lightening is not. One exception: the 3.5 plus a NY#1 spring INCREASES pull , and is not considered a questionable mod.

Bowtie
08-28-2009, 08:58
No way would I advise anyone to use a 3.5 connector with a coil spring in a carry gun!


:patriot:

Why not? It still comes out to be close to a 5lb. trigger. Hell, even Mas Ayoob's new carry 1911 has a 4.5 lb trigger.

JJay03
08-28-2009, 11:02
Would the lone wolf piece be a good one to get? I think that was the name of the company its on glockparts.com . The thing about a 1911 with a light pull is at least they have a manual safety.

DaveA
08-28-2009, 11:22
What is it? It's a good way to screw up your gun if you don't know what you're doing. Just shoot it. It'll smooth out on it's own.

slidecrook
08-28-2009, 12:00
...will absolutely be jumped on by any prosecutor or civil liablity attorney worth his/her salt.

Instead of focusing on why you feared for your life, the jury will be treated to why you thought you do some self-help gunsmithing and why you decided to put in a connector that the manufacturer recommends against.
This should be our paramount concern.

JJay03
08-28-2009, 12:05
I dont see how you could mess the gun up by a little polishing. I just dont see how you would screw something up unless your totally ignorant. I took my 1911 frame apart down to every last piece and it wasnt that bad at all. The glock looks a lot more simple then that even.

DaveA
08-28-2009, 12:10
I dont see how you could mess the gun up by a little polishing. I just dont see how you would screw something up unless your totally ignorant. I took my 1911 frame apart down to every last piece and it wasnt that bad at all. The glock looks a lot more simple then that even.

All I know is I always see threads in here along the lines of:

"Tried a .25 cent trigger job and now something is wrong"

Usually people take too much off would be my guess.

Duck of Death
08-28-2009, 13:23
*QUOTE*
What exactly is the .25 trigger job?

A waste of time, learn how to do a real trigger job on a Glock.

ewasson
08-28-2009, 16:17
I used a ceramic sharpening stone (Ultra-fine) from my Lansky knife sharpening kit. I choose this method because the ceramic stone does a fine job of smoothing and shining with taking off too much metal. It is thin and small enough to use. The down side is that is incredibly (super-incredibly) time consuming. But if you hurry this job, you will probably do bad things to your firearm. I can do very precise polishing with the stone, plus running the parts against the stone while polishing provides feedback that lets me know when I need to polish more, and more importantly when I need to STOP polishing.

04LS1GTO
12-03-2009, 00:27
No sense in starting a new thread when I could resurrect an old one :) I've thought about doing this (by hand, not with a dremel) but am afraid of making my trigger pull too light. :( I have a NY1 spring right now, but also have my regular "S" coil spring. If it lightens the pull, would it be worth it to continue using my NY1? Or will it not really affect the pull weight with the standard coil?

Would this void the warranty?

3rdgen40
12-03-2009, 07:59
What exactly is the .25 trigger job?
It's a giant,steaming pile of BS.That's what it is...

TRX450R_Racer
12-03-2009, 08:35
It's not brain surgery. Just go easy and you won't have a problem. Polish it don't grind it. I've done it to all my Glocks and I have the Ghost ultimate 3.5lb connector in all of them. I even have the same set up in my carry gun.

220-9er
12-03-2009, 09:06
I did mine yesterday. Several videos & instructions on the web.
Smooths out rough surfaces that are on some guns to make the trigger smoother, not lighter.
My 8 year old G27 was a lot smoother, even new, than my 6 month old 19. When I took it apart I found out why. The stamped metal parts that contact each other look like the tooling they used was older and did not make as smooth a cut. The trigger felt like it had a little bit of grit. I used a EZE-Lap Diamond stick sharpener for support with some 800 grit paper wrapped around instead of a Dremel. More precise and just polishes and smooths the rough spots. Just take your time and be careful however you do it.
One advantage is that you should feel a lot more comfortable with the mechanics of your gun after disassembling and reassembling. Just take your time and follow the instructions carefully. Stop and see whats wrong if something doesn't feel right. The only thing that takes a little finesse is the trigger pin. I found that wiggling the slide stop around was the problem as it uses the same pin. But no force is required, just moving it a little so the pin can slide through smoothly. It took me about 10 minutes to take it apart the first time while reading the instructions carefully. Now I can strip it and reassemble in a fraction of the time and feel confident I did it right. And I have a NY1 in it too.

Bowtie
12-03-2009, 09:51
It's a giant,steaming pile of BS.That's what it is...

WHAT? :faint:

sgtlmj
12-03-2009, 10:08
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=.25+cent+trigger+job

3rdgen40
12-03-2009, 10:22
WHAT? :faint:
Shooting your gun will yield much better results.Just think about all the nimrods out there that have taken files, dremmel tools,sand paper,bench grinders(:faint:) to trigger bars and connectors.Its kind of scary...:shocked:

Bowtie
12-03-2009, 10:32
Shooting your gun will yield much better results.:

I disagree. If your gun is lubed as it should be then there is no way the metal to metal contacts with smooth themselves out. The .25 trigger job done right will make a big difference in smoothing out the action..

TRX450R_Racer
12-03-2009, 10:46
i disagree. If your gun is lubed as it should be then there is no way the metal to metal contacts with smooth themselves out. The .25 trigger job done right will make a big difference in smoothing out the action..

...x2

Butch
12-03-2009, 11:27
What exactly is the .25 trigger job? (http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?p=13114122#post13114122)

It's a giant,steaming pile of BS.That's what it is...
WHAT? :faint:
That's a highly technical description!
:rofl:

Actually, as most of you probably know already, I tend to agree that most people would be much better off to go forth and shoot the gun a lot instead of polishing parts.

Doing so not only smooths the parts 'naturally', it also has the added benefit of improving one's shooting skills, and pretty much avoids the possibility of *causing* the malfunctions we see here so often that require replacement of (at least) the trigger bar.

I simply have to support Glock in saying that uneducated and inexperienced people should not (in their quest to achieve quick and easy shooting skills) be polishing the parts on a gun that they depend on to work right so they can protect innocent life and avoid needless accidents.

Butch
12-03-2009, 11:47
I disagree. If your gun is lubed as it should be then there is no way the metal to metal contacts with smooth themselves out.
I too must disagree.... 'Properly lubed', it should only have oil on the connector/trigger bar interface, right?

And, do you not put oil on a stone when you sharpen a knife?

The .25 trigger job done right will make a big difference in smoothing out the action..
Agree! But the key words there are "done right", which all too often isn't the case, especially among new Glock owners.

But look at the bright side, we don't have any bone headed fmj158's involved.....Glocks don't chamber a cartridge that's loaded with a 158 grain FMJ. :) (PM sent)

Bowtie
12-03-2009, 11:56
I too must disagree.... 'Properly lubed', it should only have oil on the connector/trigger bar interface, right?

And, do you not put oil on a stone when you sharpen a knife?


Agree! But the key words there are "done right", which all too often isn't the case, especially among new Glock owners.

But look at the bright side, we don't have any bone headed fmj158's involved.....Glocks don't chamber a cartridge that's loaded with a 158 grain FMJ. :) (PM sent)

lol back at ya..I havent had a trigger yet that felt as rough as a stone but you never know...

Lloyd-Xmas
01-04-2010, 22:33
My little brother and I both spent about four hours breaking down our glocks and doing a detailed polish on all the parts detailed in the .25 trigger job. I want that four hours of my life back.

At first we were both like... well I think it feels a little smoother. Then it was...you know, I think it feels about the same as before.

I can't say for sure but, I kind of think that was a waste of polish. My feeling is that if you are really bored, and you really just want to open up your glock (which we did want to do) then go ahead, but unless you are also changing connectors (mine has a ghost 3.5 already) I doubt you'll notice much difference.

Bowtie
01-04-2010, 22:38
My little brother and I both spent about four hours breaking down our glocks and doing a detailed polish on all the parts detailed in the .25 trigger job. I want that four hours of my life back.

At first we were both like... well I think it feels a little smoother. Then it was...you know, I think it feels about the same as before.

I can't say for sure but, I kind of think that was a waste of polish. My feeling is that if you are really bored, and you really just want to open up your glock (which we did want to do) then go ahead, but unless you are also changing connectors (mine has a ghost 3.5 already) I doubt you'll notice much difference.

Do you have an un-touched Glock there with you so you can compare the difference?

blk_she3p
01-05-2010, 17:40
Well, I must have been really bored this weekend :embarassed:. I polished mine. There feels like a little difference. I really just wanted to learn my glock so I thought I would give it a shot while gun was apart.

Lloyd-Xmas
01-07-2010, 13:00
Do you have an un-touched Glock there with you so you can compare the difference?

Yeah, his is a G19. I guess you could kind of tell, the break was maybe a little cleaner but nothing tangible I could really put my finger on. Still good because if we hadn't done it we would never have found out how easy it was to detail strip.

recycooler
01-08-2010, 15:51
Hey dear I am going to order a ghost rocket trigger for my glock would you like one for yours?

No thanks,

Are you sure?

Yes

(install trigger and .25 trigger job)

Hey dear try this..Now try yours

( reracks tries both again using reset)

BIG grin appears

I will order yours tomorrow dear

thank you.

Butch
01-08-2010, 19:07
Hey dear I am going to order a ghost rocket trigger for my glock would you like one for yours?

No thanks,

Are you sure?

Yes

(install trigger and .25 trigger job)

Hey dear try this..Now try yours

( reracks tries both again using reset)

BIG grin appears

I will order yours tomorrow dear

thank you.
Now she's gonna need a thousand repetitions of the new trigger pull.....

Jeebs40
02-27-2010, 22:59
No way would I advise anyone to use a 3.5 connector with a coil spring in a carry gun!


:patriot:
I don't quite understand this logic. What does it matter 3.5 lb or 5 lb trigger on a carry gun? (whats good for you isn't necessarily good for me) If you have any common sense at all you should know not to have your finger on the trigger unless you plan to use it. You can make all the excuses in the world but the fact is most shooting accidents happen because of ignorance, lack of training, or best of all just plain stupidity. Now you take all that into account and What does it really matter if you have a 3.5 lb or a 5 lb trigger? I personally like my 3.5 lb trigger which if anything makes me more accurate, It defiantly did not make my gun less safe.

silverbear
03-02-2010, 20:05
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=.25+cent+trigger+job

It was worth researching 25 cent trigger job just to find this little gem - lmgtfy.com! :rofl:

750SpiritRdr
03-08-2010, 20:30
LMGTFY.com!!!

ctfireman
07-10-2010, 22:24
Cool, i always wondered exactley what it meant.

GammaDriver
10-12-2010, 05:57
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=what+the+hell

Oh, I see what it does!

atxjax
10-25-2010, 07:16
awesome info. Thanks guys.

Airsprint
10-31-2010, 23:16
A rag and q tips some mothers and time is all you need to do an awesome trigger job, I made my bars and trigger mechanism's look chrome in about an hours time + no worrys of taking off too much material, definitely a small difference in smoothness and trigger break.

silverbear
11-01-2010, 14:57
This project got me to take apart my G19, do the trigger job with flitz, rag and q-tip, and re-assemble the gun. A great learning experience and confidence builder. Will do the same to 26 soon.

GammaDriver
11-01-2010, 15:58
A rag and q tips some mothers and time is all you need to do an awesome trigger job, I made my bars and trigger mechanism's look chrome in about an hours time + no worrys of taking off too much material, definitely a small difference in smoothness and trigger break.

I realize that most cleaner-waxes are a mild, mild abrasive, but it's hard to believe you buffed it all smooth enough to notice in an hour with a rag and a car wax. Are you sure the 'better' feeling trigger wasn't merely the leftover wax acting as a lubricant on the parts that rub?

glockfanbob
11-07-2010, 19:14
I realize that most cleaner-waxes are a mild, mild abrasive, but it's hard to believe you buffed it all smooth enough to notice in an hour with a rag and a car wax. Are you sure the 'better' feeling trigger wasn't merely the leftover wax acting as a lubricant on the parts that rub?

Try it yourself and you'll see. With the proper polish, q-tips/rags and some elbow grease it feels glass smooth.

GammaDriver
11-07-2010, 20:07
Try it yourself and you'll see. With the proper polish, q-tips/rags and some elbow grease it feels glass smooth.

I was planning on using my dremel... it just sounds like a LOT of time and work to get an effect with Q-tips and polish...

Christof60
11-17-2010, 16:22
after having done a $.25 trigger job....with a Dremel tool.


:patriot:What if you use a cotton wheel and jewelers rouge? I cant see that taking off enough metal to harm the part, but would surely polish the piece in a jiffy...

Sonnytoo
11-19-2010, 09:44
I don't quite understand this logic. What does it matter 3.5 lb or 5 lb trigger on a carry gun? (whats good for you isn't necessarily good for me) Now you take all that into account and What does it really matter if you have a 3.5 lb or a 5 lb trigger? It defiantly did not make my gun less safe.

I found your choice of this word, in your context, very interesting.
Sonnytoo

boileralum
11-23-2010, 15:44
I realize that most cleaner-waxes are a mild, mild abrasive, but it's hard to believe you buffed it all smooth enough to notice in an hour with a rag and a car wax. Are you sure the 'better' feeling trigger wasn't merely the leftover wax acting as a lubricant on the parts that rub?

I think the guy may have been using Mothers metal polish - I used this stuff on a set of polished aluminum wheels back in the day:

http://www.mothers.com/02_products/product/images/05100-05101.jpg

shooter918
12-06-2010, 17:36
that was new info

Zermatt
01-16-2011, 11:07
Any time I think one of my Glock's triggers feel rough, long, or spongy, I borrow a Springfield XD or XDM and press/squeeze/pull the trigger. Then I go back to shooting my Glock and feel very happy about my brand allegiance.

Bowtie
01-16-2011, 23:23
Any time I think one of my Glock's triggers feel rough, long, or spongy, I borrow a Springfield XD or XDM and press/squeeze/pull the trigger. Then I go back to shooting my Glock and feel very happy about my brand allegiance.

The XDm is far better imho than a factory glock trigger.

snuffy19608
01-20-2011, 09:10
Just finished doing my first trigger job, on my new Gen3 G17. Smoothed out greatly,and much easier than I thought. I had never taken any of my Glocks apart like that before, turned out to be super easy.

I just used some Brasso Multipurpose polish and the edge of a towel. No Dremels,just hand power. Took about an hour, about 3-4 minutes per contact point.

Now the only issue is I know how easy they are to tear apart, I'm already plotting what parts to purchase! :whistling:

JJay03
01-20-2011, 09:16
Just finished doing my first trigger job, on my new Gen3 G17. Smoothed out greatly,and much easier than I thought. I had never taken any of my Glocks apart like that before, turned out to be super easy.

I just used some Brasso Multipurpose polish and the edge of a towel. No Dremels,just hand power. Took about an hour, about 3-4 minutes per contact point.

Now the only issue is I know how easy they are to tear apart, I'm already plotting what parts to purchase! :whistling:

Thats whats great about a glock so easy to take apart and clean up and polish. I tried some aftermarket parts and ended up keeping mine stock I didnt like how the aftermarket disconnectors changed the pull.

Hoonz
05-24-2011, 19:09
Quite a few people have come here over the last ten years wondering why their Glock doesn't work, or why it fires more than one shot when they pull the trigger after having done a $.25 trigger job....with a Dremel tool.

And I may ask, how to you get to fire more than one shot with a single trigger pull :) ?

My brother just returned from LE training, and was trying to describe to me the "double tap", where you don't let the trigger completely reset but it will still fire, but seems to work best on his gun which has a modified 8.5lb trigger pull.

I have a 3.5lb trigger on mine from lonewolf; although I can fire fast, I can't doubletap it.

I'm going to try the nail file method, see if I can get it smoother, doesn't feel too great now despite the gentler pull recently added.

Butch
05-24-2011, 19:28
And I may ask, how to you get to fire more than one shot with a single trigger pull :) ?
It's just a matter of rounding off the wrong edges by 'over polishing'.....


My brother just returned from LE training, and was trying to describe to me the "double tap", where you don't let the trigger completely reset but it will still fire, but seems to work best on his gun which has a modified 8.5lb trigger pull.

I have a 3.5lb trigger on mine from lonewolf; although I can fire fast, I can't doubletap it.
I suspect that he's talking about 'using the reset' to simply fire two shots quickly vs allowing the trigger to move all the way forward and then pulling it all the way back to fire the next shot (like a double action). Read my blog for reset info....


I'm going to try the nail file method, see if I can get it smoother, doesn't feel too great now despite the gentler pull recently added.
Good luck!

Bowtie
05-25-2011, 11:55
And I may ask, how to you get to fire more than one shot with a single trigger pull :) ?

My brother just returned from LE training, and was trying to describe to me the "double tap", where you don't let the trigger completely reset but it will still fire, but seems to work best on his gun which has a modified 8.5lb trigger pull.
One of three things happened here. Either you completely misunderstood what he was saying, he didnt know how to explain it or he doesnt know what he's talking about.
I have a 3.5lb trigger on mine from lonewolf; although I can fire fast, I can't doubletap it.
A double tap is two controlled shots fired rapidly

I'm going to try the nail file method, see if I can get it smoother, doesn't feel too great now despite the gentler pull recently added.

I highly recomend you do not to touch your trigger group with a nail file

John_Doe
06-07-2011, 19:04
What if you use a cotton wheel and jewelers rouge? I cant see that taking off enough metal to harm the part, but would surely polish the piece in a jiffy...

+1
I polish everything that ever needs polishing with the cotton polishing wheels and plenty of rouge. Lots of revolutions create a much smoother surface.

I think this is actually what people are referring to when they speak of using a Dremel tool to do polishing work.

Unfortunately, many people just ASSUME you are talking about using grinding stones in your Dremel to polish. Who the hell would do that? To those who love to talk down to those of us who use Dremel tools, thank you for insinuating that we are stupid enough to grind away on sheet metal with a 100 grit grinding stone. :tongueout:

Walk Soft
06-07-2011, 19:25
Doing it with a Dremel isn't dangerous unless you're an idiot.You use the cotton polishing wheels.I have done all mine and it usually reduces the trigger pull by .5 lbs but it makes it alot smoother.

Bowtie
06-08-2011, 09:58
Its because it is possible to screw a connector up with just a dremel and pollish. Taking that felt wheel to an edge in the wrong place can slightly change an angle at thats all it takes to go FA. MANY have done it.

I'm not saying I dont do it because I do and have done many for my self as well as many other.

To make a blanket statement that it CANT happen with just a felt wheel and some rouge is just plain ignorant.

ptmccain
07-04-2011, 07:04
Maybe this video has been posted here, but I found this very helpful for doing the .25 cent trigger job, and it is in 1080 HD.

Link to video. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4BccY7wmIE)

Walk Soft
07-04-2011, 11:34
Its because it is possible to screw a connector up with just a dremel and pollish. Taking that felt wheel to an edge in the wrong place can slightly change an angle at thats all it takes to go FA. MANY have done it.

I'm not saying I dont do it because I do and have done many for my self as well as many other.

To make a blanket statement that it CANT happen with just a felt wheel and some rouge is just plain ignorant.

I guess I should have said is if you can follow instruction,you couldn't do damage.You leave a right angle a right angle.

applevalleyjoe
07-09-2011, 15:25
The $0.25 Glock trigger job :cool:
(http://www.alpharubicon.com/mrpoyz/glock/)

Thanks...real handy info. Can anyone recommend someone who is adept at this to perform this for a decent price?

SCmasterblaster
11-25-2011, 12:11
I looked at the web site very carefully, and I failed to see any description of what is in the tube and what is it used for.

aforster
04-04-2012, 08:24
I had heard of this trigger job sometime ago, and when I saw the video I did the work (with a dremmel) on one of my glocks. I didn't feel much change in either the trigger weight or how smooth it is.
In my opinion, if you want a smoother trigger (without making it lighter), I would recommend a titanium firing pin satefy plunger (glockstore have them). That will make your trigger A LOT more smoother while keeping the same weight.

Firecop203
04-04-2012, 18:33
I got burned in a gun deal not long ago. The used Glock 17 I purchased had one of these famous trigger jobs done to it and the previous owner didn't know what he was doing. The first time I shot it, I barely touched the trigger and it went off. WAY too light. I took it apart to check it out and found all the "polishing" that had been done. I wasn't told that there had been any work done to it.

I had to replace all the parts that had been "polished" before it would work to my satisfaction.

Two morals of the story.

Don't mess with it if you don't know what you are doing! Buyer Beware!

DCMG21
04-25-2012, 14:27
Polish just polish

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

OlliesRevenge
05-01-2012, 21:27
I like the suggestion of using a 3 way nail polish / file. I'll have to try that. I have handled these in the past and it seems to me they might be more akin to using a stone than simply polishing... but i"m no expert.

I have used my Dremel tool, the felt buffing wheel, and Flitz compound on several of my Glocks with only positive effects.

I have to wonder if some of the Dremel hack jobs being referenced involved the grinding wheel. I feel like you'd really have to work hard to screw it up with the soft wheel & polishing compound.

CR500
07-14-2012, 22:14
You obviously lost something in translation. Butch didnt say dont do the job, but dont do it with a Dremel because they take too much off.

Enhancing "perfection" is not blaming the gun.

But I dont blame you for your misunderstanding. Its only human nature to grab hold of something so you can try to feel superior and demean others thus feeling better about your own shortcomings.

:rofl:

NEOH212
07-15-2012, 00:30
What exactly is the .25 trigger job?

Unnecessary.

Your Welcome. :wavey:

et45
08-05-2012, 12:46
A waste of time unless your a noob and want to detail strip and clean your Glook for the first time.:yawn:

Bluescot
08-18-2012, 21:45
I did the Fitz and cotton swab job on a couple of Glocks.

Ended up getting them nice and clean and shiny with only a very slight reduction in the pull weight of the trigger but did seem to be a whisper smoother.

canadiantbone
12-16-2012, 00:25
I noticed the diference more doing the polishing to my 1911 more than my Glock

Matteo
02-17-2013, 20:48
I don't know if it was mentioned, but using a dremel with cloth wheel and auto wax with light pressure on low speed does a fine job quickly and will not remove any material.

Glock+2
05-31-2013, 14:38
Should you do a .25 trigger job?

1. NO - if you don't understand
2. NO - if you don't know what each and every part does
3. NO - if you believe everything written
4. NO - if you think you will screw it up
5. NO - if you believe a cotton swab is better and as fast as using a dremel
6. NO - if your buddy says so & you believe him
7. NO - if you believe the way it is new is best
8. NO - if you think I am wrong
9. YES - if you:dunno:

All of my Glocks have been improved working on the triggers

Roger1079
08-31-2013, 13:00
I can honestly say that using a dremel on low speed with a felt polishing wheel and Flitz polish, you would have to be a real idiot to remove material. That being said, the only difference I felt polishing the connector, trigger bar, safety plunger, and firing pin lug was that the trigger take up was considerably smoother however the break of the trigger still felt the same to me. Granted, I could be wrong as I did not measure trigger pull weight with a scale.

I never bothered to do this on any Glock beyond my G34 as all it is really doing is accelerating the wear process that will happen naturally of the course of the pistols life and although it was quick and easy, it didn't seem that the gain was worth it. I am continuing to work on trigger jobs on my other Glocks one round at a time.

Brian Lee
08-31-2013, 22:59
The 25 cent trigger job is possibly the most widely misunderstood thing we talk about on GT IMO. It's also the most commonly screwed up thing that most people don't do right.

The real idea of it is this:

Glock trigger bars are made by stamping dies, and all stamping dies leave rough side edges on all parts that are made that way. This includes the trigger sear on a Glock trigger bar. On most nice guns the trigger sear is a nicely machined, smooth surface, because it's a totally machined part, but on a stock Glock, it's as rough as a corn cob since it was die stamped. The purpose of the 25 cent trigger job is to replace that rough die stamped surface with a FLAT smooth surface, to improve the smoothness of the trigger pull. And if done correctly, it certainly does improve the feel of a Glock trigger, but it only works right if you end up with that surface looking FLAT, WITH THE SHARP EDGES STILL SHARP, as they originally were from the factory, and as they have to be, to keep the proper sear engagement with the lug on the striker.

But that's where the popular misunderstanding is.

To put that sort of finish on the trigger sear, you must remove a tiny bit of the rough stamped edge until it looks like a flat machined surface under a magnifying glass, (it does not need to shine) and this is best done with stones or a very fine file, or if you have a machine shop you can put the trigger bar in a milling machine and remove about .002/.005" of an inch and you'd have it done as perfectly as any factory could have done it. The operation of the gun is not affected by removing such a small amount of material because all it does is change the exact position of the trigger by about .005" and your finger will never feel the difference, and it's also well within the original manufacturing tolerances anyway, so it's silly to be afraid of removing such a small amount of metal from that particular surface. It just doesn't hurt a thing

Where people really screw up by thinking that the 25 cent trigger job can be done by simply polishing it with a Dremel and a buffing wheel, and that's just not true at all. A buffing wheel DOES NOT accomplish this and in fact gives you an entirely different result that is not advisable at all. A rough surface that's been buffed until it shines IS NOT the same thing as a surface that's been machined flat & smooth, and therefore needs no "shine" because of it's flatness & smoothness, yet the buffing wheel crowd doesn't seem to understand that. Buffing wheels round off all the edges that are supposed to stay sharp if your sear engagement is to remain correct and keep the gun operating safely.

If you do the job correctly, and with the right tools, you end up with a FLAT surface that still has sharp corners and it does not need to be even the slightest bit shiney at all. It's the overall flatness and smoothness which improves trigger pull while keeping the gun safe, NOT THE SHINE!!! If Glock were to machine that one surface in a milling machine at the factory instead of leaving it rough from the stamping die, it would not be shinny, and shining it with a buffing wheel would bring no further improvement at all. The surface you can achieve with stones & files (or the side of an end mill) is more than smooth & shiney enough!!

So there's a popular misunderstanding right there. In their fear of "removing too much metal", people resort to buffing wheels which do not remove metal from the right place. Instead of improving the flatness & squareness of the trigger sear, they only round off the corners that need to be sharp. So a Dremel actually DOES remove too much metal, and FROM EXACTLY THE WRONG PLACES, while not removing any of the real surface roughness at all!!!

I'm sorry people are going to feel insulted, but in most cases, (most, not all) Dremels & buffing wheels are for non-engineers & non-gunsmiths who know nothing about how to do precision work on tiny metal parts. At best, the buffing wheel route does hardly any good compared to doing the job right. At worst, those buffed-shiney & rounded-off edges can affect the safety of the gun by making the sear slip off the striker lug too easily when the trigger isn't pulled. In the worst cases, this can cause double taps with one trigger pull, or even full auto operation for as long as the trigger is held back far enough to hold the safety plunger in the upward position.

To do the job right requires much more skill time & effort than going at it with a Dremel. That's why I call my version the 25 dollar trigger job. Unless you're just flubbing it up with a Dremel, it takes a lot more than 25 cents worth of a man's time & skill. The Dremel version should be called the 2 cent trigger job.

Unless you think you have the skills to do it as I've described, I strongly suggest people leave it in stock (pronounce that SAFE) condition rather than round off everything sharp with a Dremel. That's just a dead wrong thing to do to the trigger sear on ANY gun.


Dremel fans, send hate mail now......

Brian Lee
08-31-2013, 23:09
I have to wonder if some of the Dremel hack jobs being referenced involved the grinding wheel.

Probably not. A buffing wheel is all it takes to screw things up horribly.....


I feel like you'd really have to work hard to screw it up with the soft wheel & polishing compound.

Actually because all you have to do is round off sharp corners to cause problems, a buffing wheel is in fact one of the easiest tools in the world with which to totally ruin a trigger bar and make the gun unsafe. The softness of buffing wheels is precisely what prevents you from being able to keep the sharp corners sharp.

I admit Dremels have their uses, even on guns, but this particular surface on this particular part is NOT a job for a Dremel.

Brian Lee
08-31-2013, 23:18
I guess I should have said is if you can follow instruction,you couldn't do damage.You leave a right angle a right angle.

Correct. You are leaning in the right direction here, but not far enough.

It's also that the sharp corners above and below that right-angled surface MUST stay sharp, and this is impossible to do with buffing wheels. Buffing always rounds them off to some extent, even if you must use magnification to see it.

Brian Lee
08-31-2013, 23:35
Not if you use your brain doing it. Thats why its called buffing, not grinding. If you have some wits about you, the Dremel works better than anything


Sorry, but you're 100 percent wrong and Butch was 100 percent right. You seem to have missed his earlier point about things getting too rounded off. If you didn't see rounded off corners after using a buffing wheel, then your eyes are bad and you should look again with magnification.:wavey:

It's impossible to keep the corners sharp with a buffing wheel simply because they are SOFT and roll over the edges of anything you buff with them.

Brian Lee
09-02-2013, 10:55
I have to add a correction in something I said above:

"The operation of the gun is not affected by removing such a small amount of material because all it does is change the exact position of the trigger by about .005" and your finger will never feel the difference"

That's incorrect. I don't know what I was thinking at the time. The mechanism doesn't work that way, and the exact position of the trigger isn't changed by removing a little steel on the back end of the trigger bar. It's the exact amount of pre-load on the striker spring that's altered because it gets reduced by the .003" or what ever amount you took off. For a spring that gets way over a 1/2" of pre-load before it's released, that's nothing to care about.

Goldsmithy
07-10-2014, 07:05
I une 3/4" felt buffs to polish the Glock's parts. with. It keeps everything flat and square, I use the sides of the wheel, not the front This gives a flat surface rather than rounded.

I also found milling marks and a burr on the barrel feed ramp. A slight pass with a course rubberised wheel makes short work of smoothing this out.

For most glocks, all the fluff and buffs I seen deal with most glock models. An exception is the new G42. Some of the parts and connections are different. Due to my lack of experience, can anyone tell me how to F & B a Glock G42? My goal is to improve the trigger pull on my 42. As always, TIA for any help.

-CoolBreeze-
07-11-2014, 18:09
The trigger on my G21 Gen2 started getting harder to pull and seemed sticky so I did the .25 cent trigger job on it and it worked better than it did from the factory. I am not sure I would do this on the Gen4's because they have a coating on them that is supposed to make them smoother and the factory can tell if it is removed (of course the Gen 4 trigger seems to have a slightly harder trigger pull btw). Just my 2 cents worth. In the end you own it and do what you will.

MuddyPaws
09-24-2014, 15:05
Sorry, but you're 100 percent wrong and Butch was 100 percent right. You seem to have missed his earlier point about things getting too rounded off. If you didn't see rounded off corners after using a buffing wheel, then your eyes are bad and you should look again with magnification.:wavey:

It's impossible to keep the corners sharp with a buffing wheel simply because they are SOFT and roll over the edges of anything you buff with them.

I get why you do not want to *even minimally* change anything about the cruciform face (sear?)-striker (lug?) engagement but after a reasonable break-in (200 rounds? more? less?) what about literally polishing (just to a mirror finish) the contact faces of the connector and trigger bar as well as the guide rails and the slide grooves with a cone shaped Dremel felt (cotton?) polishing tool at low rpm and some low abrasive polish such as or Blue Metal Polish or ... ? Ditto the contact surfaces of the safety and the disengaging bump on the trigger bar?

I don't yet own a Glock but the ability to do maintenance such as this and changing springs, as Glock recommends, on my own, is one of the reasons I'm so interested in Glock.

Question 2: Is there a definitive Glock recommendation re: when to replace springs on G30sf?

Question: Is the G30sf a Gen3 with a few Gen4 improvements 'slipstreamed'? I haven't been able to confirm yet whether it has the dual recoil spring arrangement.

Sincere Thanks
pax vobiscum

msgtmmgn
10-06-2014, 18:11
Nice additional information

Rando
10-07-2014, 18:59
you could always shoot thousands of rounds through it and let the parts "machine" themselves smooth :)

rufinishedyet
10-08-2014, 17:03
you tube has a very good video of a .25 cent trigger job, from start to finish