Maligayang Araw ng Kalayaan!!! :) [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Maligayang Araw ng Kalayaan!!! :)


horge
06-12-2009, 01:34
http://i44.tinypic.com/25fh8c8.gif
http://i39.tinypic.com/64l561.gif http://i39.tinypic.com/64l561.gif http://i39.tinypic.com/64l561.gif

Happy Independence Day!!!

PMMA97
06-12-2009, 01:53
Happy 111th Independence Day!

I can't raise my Philippine flag at our home. It might be drenched by the rain.

atmarcella
06-13-2009, 01:36
wala lang ako magawa ha....

curious lang ako,

why celebrate the decleration of independence, when everybody else celebrates the achievement of it?

do doctors, lawyers etc. remember and celebrate the day they decided to take up their profession?

usually they celebrate and remember the day they became (passed the board) what they are.

if the reason is we do not want to remember our colonial past then why? whats the shame in being subjugated by 1...2 other countries, most countries also had colonial masters, afaik only thailand didnt have any, im sure out of 10... 8 were colonized.


wala lang....

i_am_infinity
06-13-2009, 10:58
I'm deeply saddened by the lack of Patriotism in our country today...Share ko lang thoughts ko...sorry....

horge
06-13-2009, 15:10
wala lang ako magawa ha....

curious lang ako,

why celebrate the decleration of independence, when everybody else celebrates the achievement of it?

do doctors, lawyers etc. remember and celebrate the day they decided to take up their profession?

usually they celebrate and remember the day they became (passed the board) what they are.

You've got it switched around.
The date you declare your independence is when you "pass the board".
What you do after THAT determines whether you are practicing the profession
or not. The 1st point to independence is recognizing that WE are the only ones
qualified to give ourselves a "board exam", hence our own declaration is our
rite of passage.

if the reason is we do not want to remember our colonial past then why? whats the shame in being subjugated by 1...2 other countries, most countries also had colonial masters, afaik only thailand didnt have any, im sure out of 10... 8 were colonized.

You're reading way too much into our independence day commemorations.
BTW, the 'Thais' were subjugated by the Javans around the 7th century,
and paid open tribute to Chinese despots. It's as much a US client state
as we are today.

Seriousy, Andrew, we're simply trying to mark our national birthday.
How would you feel if I showed up at your child's birthday, and turned
it into an "intellectual debate" on why it should be celebrated, on whether
she had "earned" the right to it, or on the legitimacy of your kid's origins?
Ang dahilan ko... 'wala lang.

Just think about it, pare.
:)

h.

Allegra
06-13-2009, 20:14
I'm deeply saddened by the lack of Patriotism in our country today...Share ko lang thoughts ko...sorry....


I want a law that would make it legal for us batukan ang mga taong di man lang tumigil o tumayo tuwing ang ating pambansang awit ay inaawit

Single Stacker
06-13-2009, 20:24
I think there is something and you can be charged. Maybe Horge or our lawyer friends here can confirm.

While on the topic, is it mandatory for a civilian authority/official (president, mayor etc) to place his right hand over his heart when the national anthem is played? How about policemen? I think I saw some placing their hands over their chest/heart especially women officers.

I sort of like the way the Germans were doing it before. Stretching their right arm outward (or do they do this only when greeting an official?).

Sorry so many questions:supergrin:

SS

PMMA97
06-13-2009, 22:58
REPUBLIC ACT NO. 8491 penalizes violators but I'm afraid that the term "batukan" was never included in the penalties.

Full text of RA 8491
http://www.chanrobles.com/republicactno8491.htm

It's one of many laws that are so good when you read it in paper but almost impossible to enforce.

saki1611
06-13-2009, 23:52
I think there is something and you can be charged. Maybe Horge or our lawyer friends here can confirm.

While on the topic, is it mandatory for a civilian authority/official (president, mayor etc) to place his right hand over his heart when the national anthem is played? How about policemen? I think I saw some placing their hands over their chest/heart especially women officers.

I sort of like the way the Germans were doing it before. Stretching their right arm outward (or do they do this only when greeting an official?).

Sorry so many questions:supergrin:

SS

it's not mandatory, it supposedly shows how you sincerely respect the flag and the national anthem. actually even in our formal gatherings or rites it depends to the taste of the organizer whether to salute or place the right hand on the chest when singing the national anthem. yet, we stand on attention and we face where flag is standing. but during flag raising and flag retreat ceremony, when we are in uniform, we must and tend to salute the flag while being raise or down. personally, i place my right hand on my chest when singing the national anthem.

PMMA97
06-14-2009, 00:22
If the law is to be obeyed I think it is mandatory or else baka batukan ni Allegra LOL

horge
06-14-2009, 01:01
I want a law that would make it legal for us batukan ang mga taong di man lang tumigil o tumayo tuwing ang ating pambansang awit ay inaawit

Batok lang?

I'd tie 'em down and talk to them for hours about late Neolithic burial-goods
profiles, and how electon-probe microscopy, radiocarbon dating, and the
sheer percentages of nephrite, of Indo-Pacific monochrome glass beads
and of Chinese glass coil-beads, gives hard insight to Philippine proto-history,
and to regional maritime trade; in contrast to the lazy, speculative and
politically-motivated falsehoods perpetuated by so many fake historians.

If I'm feeling particularly vicious, I'd let 'em have it in Tagalog*
:supergrin: :supergrin: :supergrin:

h.

*After Pangalatoc and Ilokano, the least pleasant-sounding Filipino dialect,
and the most mind-numbingly circuitious of them all.

atmarcella
06-14-2009, 03:42
kasi, kasi, kasi, kasi.....

if you consider the declaration as the day that we started to run this country then how old are we? 111? and look at what we are now? a poverty stricken third world country.

when in reality, we only started running this country in 1946... diba?


Seriousy, Andrew, we're simply trying to mark our national birthday.
How would you feel if I showed up at your child's birthday, and turned
it into an "intellectual debate" on why it should be celebrated, on whether
she had "earned" the right to it, or on the legitimacy of your kid's origins?
Ang dahilan ko... 'wala lang.

Just think about it, pare.


me and my big mouth.... seriously.... im sorry.


once in a while i just like asking provocative questions that stir the mind. i did not mean to stir your hearts.

You've got it switched around.


but, the declaration of independence is not the achievement of it. when you passed the board you have achieved something, that is the right to practice your proffession. when you declare independence, that does not give you the right to govern a country. you have to win first, by hook, crook or in our case, befriend the ruler, help him fight an enemy.

:wavey::wavey::wavey::wavey::wavey:

horge
06-14-2009, 06:59
if you consider the declaration as the day that we started to run this country then how old are we? 111? and look at what we are now? a poverty stricken third world country.

when in reality, we only started running this country in 1946... diba?

In reality, we controlled everything except Manila in May of 1898
Officially, we started running things in June of 1898.
Officially and in reality, we lost control in December of 1898
Officially, control was given back to us in 1946.
In reality, we haven't controlled jack to this very day.

Again: officially, we first declared our independence in June of 1898.
That's all that Independence Day celebrates: the first official declaration.
If you're instead looking for a date on which we became truly independent,
you're hunting for mermaids in the desert.
:)

but, the declaration of independence is not the achievement of it. when you passed the board you have achieved something, that is the right to practice your proffession.
We obviously disagree on the analogy. Here is mine, again:

-You pass the board exams once, and practice your profession (or not) the rest of your life.
-You declare independence once, and live independently (or not) after that.
Declaring independence is the license. Trying to make independence a reality is the practice.

A simple explanation for "June 12th" is this:
We have birthday celebrations, but don't formally commemorate each living day after our birth.
We celebrate the declaration of independence, whereas BEING independent is day-to-day work.

when you declare independence, that does not give you the right to govern a country. you have to win first, by hook, crook or in our case, befriend the ruler, help him fight an enemy.

Again, the right to govern ourselves is at the heart of independence:
the principle that we possess the right, independent of any "licensing agency".

The ability to govern ourselves is a different matter.
If oppressors reduce us to a sub-animal existence, still do we remain human beings
with human rights, unless we ourselves abandon our humanity. The same applies to
our rights of self-determination when an oppressor deprives us of them. We are
deprived only of the ability, but not the right, unless we ourselves abdicate the latter.

This "right of self-determination" thing is, of course easily taken to extremes by
those who love intellectual discussions, to the point were every person can
theoretically declare him/herself a sovereign state. In fact this is precisely the
slippery-slope justification used by secessionists, as they paint even a democratic
milieu of local self-determination as still being unfairly insufficient, and blame it
(and the central government) for whatever ails the local folk.

Recursively, the "whatever ails the local folk" is the very same thing that the
secessionist leader has claimed as its root: a supposed lack of self-determination.

Only the very stupid fall for this circuitious illogic, all while the secessionist
demagogue laughs his way to a (mini) Head-of-State job he couldn't otherwise
get elected to.

Anyway, a belated, non-political "Happy Independence Day" to all Filipinos.

:) :) :)

Allegra
06-14-2009, 17:09
Batok lang?

I'd tie 'em down and talk to them for hours about late Neolithic burial-goods
profiles, and how electon-probe microscopy, radiocarbon dating, and the
sheer percentages of nephrite, of Indo-Pacific monochrome glass beads
and of Chinese glass coil-beads, gives hard insight to Philippine proto-history,
and to regional maritime trade; in contrast to the lazy, speculative and
politically-motivated falsehoods perpetuated by so many fake historians.

If I'm feeling particularly vicious, I'd let 'em have it in Tagalog*
:supergrin: :supergrin: :supergrin:

h.

*After Pangalatoc and Ilokano, the least pleasant-sounding Filipino dialect,
and the most mind-numbingly circuitious of them all.

Fafa , is that research your work or is it just a hobby?

horge
06-14-2009, 17:40
Fafa , is that research your work or is it just a hobby?

Work? Good heavens, sensei...
I'm retired.
:wavey:

atmarcella
06-14-2009, 23:30
In reality, we controlled everything except Manila in May of 1898


yes i agree. aguinaldo was knocking on the gates of manila during that time. it is sad. bcos he could've entered it easily.... very easily. and taken the americans out of the equation for all time. but fact is... he did not. he waited at request of dewey and when deweys troops arrived.... THEY ENTERED OUR BEHIND or pwede din "****ed us in the ass".

this is accdg. to nick joaquin, in his book "a question of heroes"

If you're instead looking for a date on which we became truly independent,
you're hunting for mermaids in the desert.


but we achieved FULL independence on july the 4th. which is the day a filipino ruled this country without an american governor-general looking over his shoulders.

which brings me to my advocacy.


why cant we pay homage to that day?

that day did not come to us easily. the filipinos who fought side by side the americans in bataan, before the jap cruelty during the death march, could've easily sided w/ the japanese.

my friends this was not far from the realm of reality during that time.

imagine you are a filipino during that time. you've just been subjugated by the americans. cruelly in many cases (balinggaga). you have been yearning for self determination after being ruled by caucasians for 300years. they promise you that. but are they going to give it? considering the abundant natural resources they can exploit to their gain. BUMALABS.

here is another asian. if im going to be ruled by another race why not an asian like me? same height, build etc. uglier eyes only.


heck, why not?

when in fact many did.

now. what if the filipinos who fought beside the americans fought against them?


would we have our cherished independence now?

think about it.:wavey::wavey::wavey::wavey::wavey:

atmarcella
06-14-2009, 23:32
after all that, let me reiterate,

july 4 did not come to us easily.

Allegra
06-15-2009, 06:41
How times change
Nuon tinatago ang mga babae pag dumadating ang mga hapon

i_am_infinity
06-15-2009, 23:09
How times change
Nuon tinatago ang mga babae pag dumadating ang mga hapon

fafa A dapat may emoticons hehehe :tongueout:

Wp.22
06-16-2009, 03:03
diba bawal mabasa ang flag bakit pag umuulan eh hindi tinatangal yung mga nakasabit sa mga poste dito sa pasig?

Single Stacker
06-16-2009, 04:03
Pot,

Bawal magkasakit, kaya ayaw nila mabasa di bale na yung flag.


SS

jerrytrini
06-17-2009, 09:58
Philippine Independence Day Shootfest 2009

The American and Philippine flags were hoisted very ceremoniously, no problem with that. However, during the singing of the national anthems, a LOT of shooters, were jawjacking, assgrabbing, smoking, not at attention etc etc. I was so irritated by that sight. The same thing happened when the Los Angeles Consul gave the opening remarks.

It was very noble of him to wear a Barong Tagalog and to have his consulate staff on hand to coordinate the 2-day event.

I would give the banquet and awards presentation 5 Stars at least. The food was set on six or seven long tables enough to feed another day of shooting. The Dept of Tourism and the Norco Running Gun Club raffled off 3 C-More sights, 6 Oakley and 6 Wiley-X glasses, 3 Safariland prototype holsters, Barsto barrels, thousands of bullets, Vihta Vuori powders, cleaning stuff, bottles of wine, STI mag kits. Giveaways as you enter the reception hall were bottles of gun oil. The grand prize, round trip ticket to the Philippines was won by a junior shooter.