What's a good reloader press? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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boholglock
06-18-2009, 05:56
Hello Brothers,
I would like to seek your expert opinion on the topic of reloading.
Which brand do you prefer and why? (pros and cons)
Is it really that cost-effective to reload?
If there has been a similar thread, please kindly share me the link.
Thanks in advance.
B*h*lGl*ck

bulm540
06-18-2009, 06:10
Dillon. llifetime no BS warranty.

liveandletlive
06-18-2009, 06:14
Lee Pro1000 for its simplicity, functionality and low price. You'd be surprised how well it can function when setup properly. Haven't had any squib load in many thousands of rounds loaded. I think it is better than Dillon 550B in terms of function. I've seen way too many squibs coming out of 550s. Last one I saw destroyed a Sunico STI/Caspian/Scheumann(?spell)/C-more race gun. The C-more flew a few feet up in the air (ouch!) and the barrel looked like a bamboo splitting. The Dillons look better made though. IMHO Dillon 650 is better than the Lee but is more... much more... expensive. If it is available, Hornady LnL is a very good option. I'd personally go for it if money is of no concern. For my hard earned money and my shooting skills level and the competitions I go to, the Lee is plenty good enough for me.

liveandletlive
06-18-2009, 06:29
Is it really that cost-effective to reload?
B*h*lGl*ck

Yes, but you'll find yourself shooting more. So, without you realizing it you'd be spending more. But... it is fun. It's like having another gun (only the head goes in rather than out of the shell) that you can crank up even if the rain or your busy sched would not allow you to go to the range. I sometimes loose track of time when I'm in front of my press and only stops when my wife knocks on my reloading room to make me realize that the noise from the press is irritating at 2 in the morning.:whistling:

And...

You'll have lots more ammo to burn when the rain stops...:cool:

bulm540
06-18-2009, 06:41
squibs in 550s are operator error not the fault of the machine. Have seen squibs from a Lee 1000 too. We were in a State match in TN. 2 squibs in 1 stage. Guy have to go to Walmart to buy ammo. Guy was a seasoned reloader.

sandman_sy
06-18-2009, 06:54
hhmm... one thing to consider is budget.. I did not want to spend 50k on a reloading setup.. so i went with LEE.. its cheaper but more hassle especially if your super kuripot.. and go with single press ( like i did, because i only reload .223 rounds and soon .308).

But i know a friend who did a setup with good dies, it was awesome and i can really see that it was hassle free. Dillon 550 i think yung machine nya with redding dies and some other stuff.. Halo2x.. best of brands kinuha nya to get a very precise machine.

It saves money.. but a time monster... i spend like 6 hours in front of my reloading bench.. hehehe.. the reason why people reload is not because of money i think. its more on the want and need to have a better and precise loads. iba talaga when you do it yourself :) and of course for the fun of it. Bago lang ko nag.reload but man, i wish i did this a long time ago.

Gun Ban is coming so it would be nice to load around the house.. hehehe clean the shells, prep the case, make a few thousands of rounds.. para pag.shooting season na.. lock and load kana :) heheheheh....

boholglock
06-18-2009, 07:05
Thanks for the swift replies. Keep the inputs coming.

9MX
06-18-2009, 07:50
dillon 550b - no bs warranty..note that rl 1050b doesn't have the same warranty kasi industrial na siya.

lee load pro - i've heard from rico papa that its faster than the dillon 550b in loading a 100 rounds. i think that's true.

for me, dillon's weakness are its dies, particular the sizing die and crimping die. wchich is why i use lee u dies and fcd dies

liveandletlive
06-18-2009, 08:05
squibs in 550s are operator error not the fault of the machine. Have seen squibs from a Lee 1000 too. We were in a State match in TN. 2 squibs in 1 stage. Guy have to go to Walmart to buy ammo. Guy was a seasoned reloader.

Yup, it can happen to the best reloader with the best machines. And I too think it is usually an operator error. You really have to pay attention when you're reloading.

The difference I think is in the way the machine works. The Pro1000 is an auto indexing machine like the 650. It also has a simple but effective empty brass loader that is integrated with the machine (less added cost) . So in a Pro1000 you crank the press with your right hand and put the head with your left. One job for each hand. The 550B don't come with a brass loader (you may be able to add one for a lot more money) and does not auto index. So the operator goes - load a shell with the left + put a head with the right then turn the shellplate with the left hand + crank the lever with the right. 2 jobs for each hand and you always have to remember where you are. You're bound to make more mistakes with the more complicated operation than with the simpler one. That doesn't mean one can't have a squib with the Lee though.

If you have the means, skip the 550B and go straight to the 650 with a KISS loader. Especially if you are a high volume shooter. If you're a weekend warrior type of shooter and don't want to spend more than what's needed, a Single Stage Press with some type of quick release bushing, Pro1000 for a little more money (maybe - because it can even be cheaper) or the 550B (if your attention span is still at its prime) are sensible choices IMHO.

paltik45
06-18-2009, 09:26
I use LEE CLASSIC TURRET PRESS for pistol rounds and it is semi progressive. But for my rifle rounds I,ve been using my RCBS single stage press.:supergrin:

mtho
06-18-2009, 10:04
sabi nila for rifle or mas precise (ok ok) bullet kelangan single stage. kasi your always handleing the bullets in every stage kaya you'd spot it if there's something wrong.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ut_I1GMm_c4&feature=PlayList&p=EEAE18226C23CA88&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=26
but kung 45 lang loload mo at nag mamadali ka. you could try the Lee loadmaster you could even add a bullet feeder and a case feeder for just a little more.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCFFpHyHyB4&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pfep9hXXKBw&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRkbrJNWbpQ

edtf
06-18-2009, 18:36
dillon 550b - no bs warranty..note that rl 1050b doesn't have the same warranty kasi industrial na siya.

lee load pro - i've heard from rico papa that its faster than the dillon 550b in loading a 100 rounds. i think that's true.

for me, dillon's weakness are its dies, particular the sizing die and crimping die. wchich is why i use lee u dies and fcd dies

I second that. I also use lee factory crimp die for my 9mm on a 550b. it is just a bit short but it would work.

Dillon is top service. I had some damaged parts e-mailed them and there are times I paid for shipping there were times they just sent the part.

sandman_sy
06-18-2009, 21:48
I use LEE CLASSIC TURRET PRESS for pistol rounds and it is semi progressive. But for my rifle rounds I,ve been using my RCBS single stage press.:supergrin:

Where did you get your RCBS bro paltik?? i heard it a good press daw :)

st. matthew
06-18-2009, 22:00
O.T.
where do you guys get your reloading components for your rifles?

tia:wavey:

ess45
06-18-2009, 23:38
Hello Brothers,
I would like to seek your expert opinion on the topic of reloading.
Which brand do you prefer and why? (pros and cons)
Is it really that cost-effective to reload?
If there has been a similar thread, please kindly share me the link.
Thanks in advance.
B*h*lGl*ck

Lots of information on the reloading section of this forum.

My present setup

Dillon RL 550 for 40SW
Hornady LNL AP for 45ACP and 400 Corbon
Redding T7 turret press for rifle (223, 308, 6.5 Grendel and 7.62X39)

Pistol dies, I have Hornady, Dillon and Lee. Lee dies are cheap and they are good. For resizing I like Dillon because the decapping rod/pin are easy to remove, thus easy to clean and dillon dies don't rust,
For seating die, I prefer Lee because they are easy to adjust (especially if using different bullet shapes and brand and different pistols of the same caliber that likes different OAL).
For crimp dies all brand work well for me but I prefer Hornady for 400 Corbon.
I have Lee Factory crimp die but never have the need to use them.

Rifle dies, I have Lee, Forster and Redding but I prefer Redding dies.

Powder measure- I prefer Lee Pro Auto auto disk powder measure because they are easy to set up and empty (this is what I often use in Dillon and Hornady press). One disadvantage is the fix charge (the adjustable charge bar is not consistent with the powder and charges I'm using), but the fix charges works well for me.
Dillon powder measure have adjustable charge bar but emptying requires several steps.
Hornady powder measure- the drum binds when using fine powder like Bullseye.

Priming for rifle - I use RCBS hand priming tool and or Lee auto prime 2 press mounted priming tool.
Powder measure for rifle- I use Redding 3BR but I still weight each load (the measure is not consistent with Varget powder)

atmarcella
06-19-2009, 01:57
Which brand do you prefer and why? (pros and cons)


lee loadmaster. bcos i know many dillon loaders who use lee dies, might as well use their press para uniform lahat. and if dillon cant make good dies their press cant be far off. but then again i can be wrong.

Is it really that cost-effective to reload?


no. you do it to get better bullets. in my case the gunclubs bullets were not feeding well in my barsto barreled glock, they were using dillon dies. i read an article about the advantage of taper crimping as opposed to roll crimping. i figured a taper crimp bullet would feed better. and it did.

boholglock
06-21-2009, 07:07
Should I consider the turret press? or go straight with the loadmaster?
What are the pros and cons?

mtho
06-21-2009, 11:05
here's a video opf the turret press
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1559208/lee_precision_turret_press/
you need to pull the lever 3 times to make one bullet, and price diff with the loadmaster is not big.

Hydraulicman
06-21-2009, 11:25
how much do you shoot? rifle and pistol or just pistol?

What is your budget?

BrassKnuckle
06-21-2009, 19:56
The choice between the LEE Turret Press and the LEE Loadmaster would really depend on the volume of reloading that you intend to do. I personally (and this is just me) would choose the Turret Press because by disabling the auto-index mechanism I can turn it into a single stage press. I have more faith in ammo loaded with a single stage as I can peer into all the charged cases (sitting in a loading block) to make sure that each contains the same amount of powder. If volume reloading is called for, I can activate the turret press' auto-index mechanism and load at a pretty decent rate.

I understand that the Loadmaster can also be used to load singly, but I don't want the extra expense of a progressive and the added clutter of a shell plate since I'll be using it mostly as a single stage anyway. As I said, that's just me.

A friend asked me about reloading recently and we did the math on roll-your-own-reloads versus having them done in a shop. We found out that the savings was very small, specially when you are a heavy shooter and can avail of volume discounts from reloading shops. Of course this assumes that there are reputable shops near your location. It also assumes that you trust someone else to reload your ammo and that is usually the issue for fastidious shooters.

From what I've seen, it is actually a misconception that you can save a lot by reloading. That's because components are bought in bulk, and since they're on hand already there is a tendency for you to shoot and reload more. Cost per shot does go down, but total expense goes up from the higher volume of shooting. Sometimes dramatically so.

The investment on the equipment is not an issue as you can recoup that when you decide to sell them later on. Given the scarcity of reloading gear here in the Phils, it is possible to even sell the equipment for more than you originally paid for them.

atmarcella
06-21-2009, 22:38
i second what BK said. the rate of the turret is pretty decent. its like DSL. the single stage is like dial-up. the loadmaster is cable.

liveandletlive
06-21-2009, 23:50
One other advantage of the turret is the ease of changing calibers.

Assuming that you have extra turrets with adjusted dies in it, it's just a matter of removing one turret with a simple twist and pull, putting another one in and changing the shell holder by sliding one off and the other in. No screws, nuts or whathaveyou to worry about. Still it is not as fast as a progressive and you do need to pull the lever 3 or 4 times (depending on whether you have the 3-hole or 4-hole model) to make 1 loaded ammo. With a progressive you get 1 ammo per crank of the lever. Can't beat that speedwise. They are different tools for different needs/wants. Decide what's for yours. If you can't decide, get one of each :whistling:. But do get one if you are serious about the sports. And be responsible and get a license for it. It's just a one time thing:wavey:. No renewals....

bulm540
06-22-2009, 06:06
If you want to load multiple calibers theen the dillon 550 is the way to go. Thier is a quick change tool head. I can chage calibers in less than 5 mins.

liveandletlive
06-22-2009, 06:49
Less than a minute. That's how quick you can change calibers in a turret.

paltik45
06-22-2009, 09:44
Less than a minute. That's how quick you can change calibers in a turret.

Yup I agree wid u kabayan, I got individual turrets for .45acp, 9mm, .40, 38spl and .38super. To change the set-up all need to do is "Twist and Pop":supergrin:


BTW, is there any store here in the Philippines that sells LEE reloading products? Thanks

i_am_infinity
06-22-2009, 10:02
Meron ba LEE press dito satin?

bulm540
06-22-2009, 17:32
I'll say it again. Cry only once get a dillon.

liveandletlive
06-22-2009, 17:52
Yup I agree wid u kabayan, I got individual turrets for .45acp, 9mm, .40, 38spl and .38super. To change the set-up all need to do is "Twist and Pop":supergrin:


BTW, is there any store here in the Philippines that sells LEE reloading products? Thanks

None that I know of. Found this in another forum http://pinoy1911.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=salehere&action=display&thread=4391

BrassKnuckle
06-22-2009, 21:46
I'll say it again. Cry only once get a dillon.

Here's what I say: Get a Dillon for volume reloading and get a good single stage for loading small lots, or for load development.

A Dillon is good for making a large quantity of the same type of load, but calibrating it to run a small batch of different-spec ammo can be a hassle. I'm not talking about switching calibers.

For example, your Dillon is set-up to load .38spl ammo using 148gn wadcutter bullets and the corresponding powder charge. The amount of work needed to adjust it to load a small batch of the same .38spl ammo but with a 125gn jhp bullet and the new powder charge would be a hassle. Such jobs are best done with a single stage and, if the batch is small enough, maybe just a trickler and a scale.

Reloaders are just tools; we use what is best for the job. The reason I picked the Lee Turret Press in our hypothetical case was because it is a good compromise between a full progressive and a full single stage given that the only choices were that and the Loadmaster.

brawnless
06-22-2009, 22:57
sirs,

how much is the net cost of self reloaded ammo?

thanks!

b

BrassKnuckle
06-22-2009, 23:24
sirs,

how much is the net cost of self reloaded ammo?

thanks!

b

Just got these numbers for loading .45acp ammo using 200gn heads and VV N340 powder (that was the only powder they had).

Head: 2.70
Primer 2.60 (Tama ba yon? P1.80 daw yung small pistol primer)
Powder: 1.71 (6gns of VV N340 @ P2,000 per lb)
Total: 7.00

You actually end up spending more by reloading your own ammo. You save a little by using faster burning powder (that requires a smaller amount) but as you can see, the major cost components are the head and the primer.

What this says in effect is that, by going into reloading, you buy all the expensive equipment so you can do extra work to load more expensive ammo.

I hope the lady I spoke to gave me the wrong prices. Been some time since I had to buy components. Ang mahal na pala! Can someone please confirm if the above prices are in the right ballpark?

bunso2007
06-23-2009, 01:28
san b nakakabili lee? gano sya ka cheap compared to dillon?

liveandletlive
06-23-2009, 01:36
A friend bought a Lee Pro1000 complete with .40S&W Dies, Powder MEasure, Shell Feeder with Collator for 25k. All he needed to do was bolt the whole thing, adjust die settings, add the components, crank the lever while putting heads with each turn of the shellplate and out came reloaded ammo. It's a lot more expensive than the price at Lee site but considering the shipping and custom dues, baka ok na din yung 25k.

BrassKnuckle
06-23-2009, 02:14
A friend bought a Lee Pro1000 complete with .40S&W Dies, Powder MEasure, Shell Feeder with Collator for 25k. All he needed to do was bolt the whole thing, adjust die settings, add the components, crank the lever while putting heads with each turn of the shellplate and out came reloaded ammo. It's a lot more expensive than the price at Lee site but considering the shipping and custom dues, baka ok na din yung 25k.

Wow how prices have gone up! I remember that back in '90-'91 P5-6k could buy you a new RCBS Rockchucker, and that already came with a Little Dandy powder measure.

Around '95 or so, the best deal for a Dillon Square Deal B was P12k, and the 550 was P18k IIRC.

Primers then were P0.90 a pop. Powder, usually Hercules or Winchester (231), was P600 a pound; sometimes given to you in a plastic supot. :rofl: Heads were less than a buck. P0.75 lang yata.

Moral lesson: If you're going to do it, might as well start sooner than later as the price increases will get you. (This applies to buying guns too. Remember when Glocks were going for only P21k bnew? Mga mid 90's..)

adenine
06-23-2009, 17:20
Been thinking of reloading since I started shooting. Maybe I should really look for one now. Prices are getting higher. I dont shoot a lot anymore, so maybe a single stage press would do for me? Anybody sellin one?:supergrin:

bulm540
06-23-2009, 19:54
GEt a progressive reloader. Use to enjoy reloading a lot but now it feels like it is a chore. The quicker the better. 450 rounds/ hour in my Dillon 550.

cebupistol
06-23-2009, 20:03
Tried this before but ended up replacing the single die turrent press with a dillon 550. It's good for 20-50 rounds loading but more than that, it takes a lot of time.

For the lee single die turrent loader, it takes me more than an hour for less than a hundred rounds while dillon makes about 300-400 in an hour.

If you still really want to load, go for Lee single reloader press which cost about 2000 pesos plus add lee dies, power dispenser and hand priming tool. That way, you could do on separate times the de priming, priming, power, etc..


Been thinking of reloading since I started shooting. Maybe I should really look for one now. Prices are getting higher. I dont shoot a lot anymore, so maybe a single stage press would do for me? Anybody sellin one?:supergrin:

adenine
06-23-2009, 20:19
Tried this before but ended up replacing the single die turrent press with a dillon 550. It's good for 20-50 rounds loading but more than that, it takes a lot of time.

For the lee single die turrent loader, it takes me more than an hour for less than a hundred rounds while dillon makes about 300-400 in an hour.

If you still really want to load, go for Lee single reloader press which cost about 2000 pesos plus add lee dies, power dispenser and hand priming tool. That way, you could do on separate times the de priming, priming, power, etc..

Bro, any idea where I could find a Lee single reloader press? Jimbullet, I should have kept the Lee!:crying:

I'm actually saving for a Dillon 550, but i'm interested in a Lee press again. TIA!

BrassKnuckle
06-23-2009, 21:21
Single stage presses can be made less of a hassle if you break down the reloading process over a few days. Here's what I used to do:

Toss the shells into the tumbler upon getting home from the range. I then decap and resize them that night. At a later day I use a LEE Auto-prime to prime them. If I still have time, I also flare the case mouths. On yet another day, I finish the process by dropping the powder charge, seating the bullet, and crimping it. Yes, I used 4-die pistol sets with separate seating and taper crimp dies.

That way I never spent more than an hour loading per day and had ammo in time for the next weekend's session. Of course a progressive would finish the whole lot in one sitting, but I was always worried when using products of a progressive.

As an aside, I used to have 2 loading blocks when charging powder. One block was to my left with the empty cases facing down (primer up). I'd get one case, charge it with powder, and put it on another loading block to my right facing up (of course). That way I could never get an already charged case and charge it with a second load of powder. (Even if I mistakenly put a charged case back on the left side loading block, facing it down would automatically dump the charge.) After all the cases were charged, I'd peer into all of them as they sat in the loading block to make sure that they all had the same amount of powder. I could then seat the bullets and crimp with confidence.

I also used a hand primer (Auto Prime) to prime cases as a separate operation as I wanted to be able to check if the primer was seated properly before proceeding with the next operation.

I was paranoid about safety and quality but my problem-free record attests to the effectiveness of these methods. It was this level of control that made me prefer a single stage over a progressive given the kind of shooting I did.

cebupistol
06-23-2009, 23:30
I don't know in Manila but here in cebu there are a couple of stores selling Lees. There should be more selling in Manila with the number of gun stores over there.

ans3288
06-23-2009, 23:58
yes the prices given are almost spot on!

Just got these numbers for loading .45acp ammo using 200gn heads and VV N340 powder (that was the only powder they had).

Head: 2.70
Primer 2.60 (Tama ba yon? P1.80 daw yung small pistol primer)
Powder: 1.71 (6gns of VV N340 @ P2,000 per lb)
Total: 7.00

You actually end up spending more by reloading your own ammo. You save a little by using faster burning powder (that requires a smaller amount) but as you can see, the major cost components are the head and the primer.

What this says in effect is that, by going into reloading, you buy all the expensive equipment so you can do extra work to load more expensive ammo.

I hope the lady I spoke to gave me the wrong prices. Been some time since I had to buy components. Ang mahal na pala! Can someone please confirm if the above prices are in the right ballpark?

BrassKnuckle
06-24-2009, 00:39
yes the prices given are almost spot on!

As my daughter would say - OMG! I was really surprised when they quoted P2.60 per large primer. I'm more surprised now that she was actually right! What I can't understand is how the same shop can offer reloads at P6 ea...

It hardly makes sense to reload anymore but those who still want reloading gear should go to the gun show next month. That's where I see a lot of them on display.

jing1117
06-24-2009, 00:59
A friend bought a Lee Pro1000 complete with .40S&W Dies, Powder MEasure, Shell Feeder with Collator for 25k. All he needed to do was bolt the whole thing, adjust die settings, add the components, crank the lever while putting heads with each turn of the shellplate and out came reloaded ammo. It's a lot more expensive than the price at Lee site but considering the shipping and custom dues, baka ok na din yung 25k.


If it would not be illegal to ship a reloader from US to the Philippines it would be really cheap. I am willing to help if it was legal to ship them. I got my complete Lee Pro 1000 here for $160 and 4 of it can fit in a Balikbayan box $75 to any location. I think its really the customs dues that are jacking up the price or the dealers.

They (Lee) are very good if you have a tight budget since a complete Dillon 550 here costs $470. Never had a problem with my lee after I set it up.

BrassKnuckle
06-24-2009, 01:52
Actually the extra that we pay for equipment that are already in-country can be considered an insurance premium. It ensures that the buyer does not bear the risk of getting caught smuggling restricted equipment and end up either paying more, in jail, or both.

It is therefore best to deal with a local shop; one that can also facilitate the permits to cover the equipment and ensure that the user is in lawful possession of said equipment.

ans3288
06-24-2009, 03:23
my sentiments exactly how can they do it lower than what they offer? are they discouraing you to reload and just have it done by them? and if you really intent on reloading on ur own then you have to pay extra for it... :crying:


...
What I can't understand is how the same shop can offer reloads at P6 ea...

It hardly makes sense to reload anymore but those who still want reloading gear should go to the gun show next month. That's where I see a lot of them on display.

cebupistol
06-24-2009, 04:20
Most of the shops actually offer you a lesser price if you buy primers and powder in bulk. But then, personally, i don't see buying a reloader more of a cost saving thing but for convenience that you don't need to go to the shop to get reloads.

If you have any easy access to a shop offering reloading services, that is a cheaper way. Reloading actually involves you in spending ahead for components which if bought in bulk, is money just sitting around

my sentiments exactly how can they do it lower than what they offer? are they discouraing you to reload and just have it done by them? and if you really intent on reloading on ur own then you have to pay extra for it... :crying:

liveandletlive
06-24-2009, 04:29
For pistol rounds, a progressive press really takes the chore out of reloading. Once the excitement of being able to reload has come and pass, you will wish you've bought a progressive instead.

But it you got a turret or a single stage as your first reloader, those are still very important tools you can have for some other reloading duties. More so if you are reloading for rifle. Trimming cases is not necessary with pistol rounds. But it is with rifle ammo. I've been reading about rifle cartridge reloading and realized that I will need to trim the case after resizing them. And you probably need to re-tumble the case to clean the brass shavings off the brass from the previous process. Then you'll have to prime the case (maybe better done with a handheld tool or the Lee Auto Prime 2), load powder, seat bullets and crimp. So a progressive is not a very wise choice for reloading your 223. Well, you can use your progressive for the second half of the process (prime-powder-seat-crimp OR powder-seat-crimp if you prime the case with a dedicated tool). You only need 3 stations for it though you can use the extra station of your 550 for a powder check die of some sort. Pro1000 only has 3 stations and is really all that's needed for the second half of the process of reloading your 223. But you really have to resize separately and IMHO this is best done in a single stage press or a turret with the auto index disabled or a 550 - just don't turn the plate. The 550 can do all if you can live with it not auto-indexing.

So buying a turret or a single stage (get one with quick release bushings) and buying a progressive later is still a good path to follow. The turret is a more usable tool than the single stage in that it can easily take the role of a single stage or a "semi-progressive" and it's quick caliber/configuration change capabilities is hard to beat.

BrassKnuckle
06-24-2009, 04:40
But then, personally, i don't see buying a reloader more of a cost saving thing but for convenience that you don't need to go to the shop to get reloads.

Well, having a lot of shells would save you trips to the shop. If someone shoots 200 rds a week, 800 shells would make him go to the shop just once a month... Make it 900 para may allowance. :2gun:

liveandletlive
06-24-2009, 04:41
If it would not be illegal to ship a reloader from US to the Philippines it would be really cheap.

What Philippine Law prohibits importation of reloaders?

I was interested in buying online because of the low cost and when I asked the post office/customs they showed me the law prohibiting the importation of gun, gun parts and ammunitions or ammo components. A reloader is not any of these so the friendly customs officer searched her book and could not show me the specific law on importing reloaders. :dunno:

BrassKnuckle
06-24-2009, 05:46
What Philippine Law prohibits importation of reloaders?

I was interested in buying online because of the low cost and when I asked the post office/customs they showed me the law prohibiting the importation of gun, gun parts and ammunitions or ammo components. A reloader is not any of these so the friendly customs officer searched her book and could not show me the specific law on importing reloaders. :dunno:

A reloader is classified as a device for producing ammunition and is regulated by the PNP/FED. Unlawful possession of one is considered an offense and comes with stiff penalties.

Don't take your chances in the hopes of saving a few thousand bucks.

liveandletlive
06-24-2009, 05:57
Thanks BrassKnuckle. Mod, sorry for the OT.

mtho
06-24-2009, 10:13
so the answer is clear na, you got to have it all. single stage,turret and progressive

cebupistol
06-24-2009, 10:54
so the answer is clear na, you got to have it all. single stage,turret and progressive


Good idea. :wavey: Throw in a case tumbler, case trimmer for rifle cases, dies for all calibers, micrometer dispenser for your powder and your good to go

ess45
06-24-2009, 11:27
My Reloading Press choices (in the order of preferrence)

Single stage

1. Lee Classic Cast- because of the price and a better primer disposal system
2. RCBS Rock Chucker
Both can be converted to lock-n-load system for faster die change.

Turret

Manual index
1. Redding T7 - very solid construction, excellent primer disposal.

Auto index
1. Lee Classic Turret

Progressive Press

Manual index
1. Dillon RL 550 B

Auto index
1. Hornady Lock-N-Load AP - because of the price plus the free 1,000 bullets. Better primer disposal system. Can be use as a turret press with auto index for load development ( I have no experience with Dillon XL 650, but based on the manual, I understand that a primer is released every stroke even if no shell is present).
2. Dillon XL 650

mtho
06-24-2009, 11:56
My Reloading Press choices (in the order of preferrence)

Single stage

1. Lee Classic Cast- because of the price and a better primer disposal system
2. RCBS Rock Chucker
Both can be converted to lock-n-load system for faster die change.

Turret

Manual index
1. Redding T7 - very solid construction, excellent primer disposal.

Auto index
1. Lee Classic Turret

Progressive Press

Manual index
1. Dillon RL 550 B

Auto index
1. Hornady Lock-N-Load AP - because of the price plus the free 1,000 bullets. Better primer disposal system. Can be use as a turret press with auto index for load development ( I have no experience with Dillon XL 650, but based on the manual, I understand that a primer is released every stroke even if no shell is present).
2. Dillon XL 650

what do you mean by lock and load?

Mattog22
06-24-2009, 12:13
Hornady, the lock and load refers to the quick change die bushings. Caliber conversions are cheaper (just a new shell plate) and faster because you keep the bushings on the dies so they keep your setting and they are just inserted and turned to lock in place. Also like said above, the Hornady is an auto-progressive unlike the Dillon 550B. Plus you get all the free bullets. I have used the hornady for quite some time and I have no complaints. I reload .380, .38special, .357 mag, 9mm, .40, 10mm, .45, .223, and 30-06 all with the hornady LNL AP.

mtho
06-24-2009, 13:15
i think the lee breech lock challenger has the quick change bushing also, but not on the lee classic.

ess45
06-24-2009, 13:45
i think the lee breech lock challenger has the quick change bushing also, but not on the lee classic.

Yes. But I still prefer the Lee Classic Cast because of it's more robust construction and better used primer disposal.

liveandletlive
06-24-2009, 18:14
so the answer is clear na, you got to have it all. single stage,turret and progressive

:thumbsup:

BrassKnuckle
06-24-2009, 19:46
What Philippine Law prohibits importation of reloaders?


I know I already gave a quick answer to this question yesterday, but here's the basis:

Republic Act 8294 - An act amending the provisions of PD 1866

"Section 1. Unlawful manufacture, sale, disposition or possession of firearms or ammunition or instruments used or intended to be used in the manufacture of firearms or ammunition. - The penalty of prision correctional in its maximum period and a fine of not less than Fifteen Thousand Pesos (15,000) shall be imposed upon any person who shall unlawfully manufacture, deal in, acquire, dispose or posses any low powered firearm such as rimfire handgun, .380 or .32 and other firearm of similar firepower, part of firearm, ammunition or machinery, tool or instrument used or intended to be used in the manufacture of any firearm or ammunition: Provided that no other crime was committed."

If you have reloaders, or intend to acquire them, please go through legal channels and have them registered. Better safe than sorry.

BrassKnuckle
06-24-2009, 20:01
so the answer is clear na, you got to have it all. single stage,turret and progressive

You can do away with the turret press if you have a single stage and a progressive.

In addition to the tools Cebupistol listed you'd need a good powder scale, a hand priming tool, some loading blocks, and a digital or dial caliper for measuring cartridge overall length.

A powder trickler is the best way for dispensing precise powder charges to the scale pan, a powder funnel may come in handy, and so is a bullet puller for taking apart questionable reloads.

Oh, and a deburring tool for cleaning primer pockets and case mouths.

Finally, you'll probably want a chrono to check if the loads made major.

Yes, one can get carried away with this hobby...

liveandletlive
06-25-2009, 03:27
I know I already gave a quick answer to this question yesterday, but here's the basis:

Republic Act 8294 - An act amending the provisions of PD 1866

"Section 1. Unlawful manufacture, sale, disposition or possession of firearms or ammunition or instruments used or intended to be used in the manufacture of firearms or ammunition. - The penalty of prision correctional in its maximum period and a fine of not less than Fifteen Thousand Pesos (15,000) shall be imposed upon any person who shall unlawfully manufacture, deal in, acquire, dispose or posses any low powered firearm such as rimfire handgun, .380 or .32 and other firearm of similar firepower, part of firearm, ammunition or machinery, tool or instrument used or intended to be used in the manufacture of any firearm or ammunition: Provided that no other crime was committed."

If you have reloaders, or intend to acquire them, please go through legal channels and have them registered. Better safe than sorry.

BrassKnuckle, I think this does not say that you cannot import a reloader IF you have a permit to own one. So if I get a permit for a reloader (which is about 3,000), I can order one online since it is no longer illegal for me to possess one? I'd still be able to save a bunch. This law does not specify that it is illegal to import a reloading machine or a "machinery, tool or instrument" for ammo production for personal use it only says that you cannot own one without a permit? Ito din yata yung pinakita sakin dun sa post office and I was going to argue that the law only specify that importing guns and parts of it is illegal but not reloaders or parts of one pero they insisted na yun na yun. So,:dunno:. Thanks for the info just the same.

BrassKnuckle
06-25-2009, 05:20
BrassKnuckle, I think this does not say that you cannot import a reloader IF you have a permit to own one. So if I get a permit for a reloader (which is about 3,000), I can order one online since it is no longer illegal for me to possess one? I'd still be able to save a bunch. This law does not specify that it is illegal to import a reloading machine or a "machinery, tool or instrument" for ammo production for personal use it only says that you cannot own one without a permit? Ito din yata yung pinakita sakin dun sa post office and I was going to argue that the law only specify that importing guns and parts of it is illegal but not reloaders or parts of one pero they insisted na yun na yun. So,:dunno:. Thanks for the info just the same.

Knowing how the FED operates they might require you to get an import permit before having one shipped.

cebupistol
06-25-2009, 19:19
You can do away with the turret press if you have a single stage and a progressive.

In addition to the tools Cebupistol listed you'd need a good powder scale, a hand priming tool, some loading blocks, and a digital or dial caliper for measuring cartridge overall length.

A powder trickler is the best way for dispensing precise powder charges to the scale pan, a powder funnel may come in handy, and so is a bullet puller for taking apart questionable reloads.

Oh, and a deburring tool for cleaning primer pockets and case mouths.

Finally, you'll probably want a chrono to check if the loads made major.

Yes, one can get carried away with this hobby...

:thumbsup:

batangueno
06-29-2009, 14:12
Kelangang din ng sturdy bench table. The first one i used had an MDF top, malambot pala yun, ayun nag-crack yung base plate ng reloader ko.

paltik45
06-29-2009, 21:57
Kelangang din ng sturdy bench table. The first one i used had an MDF top, malambot pala yun, ayun nag-crack yung base plate ng reloader ko.

Yup, it is more like compacted saw dust. I made mine from 1" thick marine plywood.:cool: