How to hook up 2nd. computer to internet? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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DeLandSkyjumper
06-27-2009, 20:15
Yes, I'm for real, I'm electronically challenged. The main computer is hooked up to a phone line, presuming "DSL". I want to hook up a 2nd computer in another room w/ an internet connection as well. can someone tell me how to go about it. Do I need a splitter off the phone jack that the primary computer is hooked up to and pick up another modem?

Like I said, I'm electronically challenged.:dunno:

StayinTriggerHappy
06-27-2009, 20:29
either way you'll probably need another modem unless both computers have internal antennas and are capable of networking wirelessly with each other through a local area network (LAN), which would be pretty slow anyhow. but assuming they can't, you'd have to get another modem similar to the one you already have at computer#1 and you'd need another phone line open near computer#2 to plug that modem into...

or you can get a wireless router at comp#1 and broadcast the internet signal from that line to any computer anywhere in your home as long as comp#2 has a wireless pc card (which will usually come with a wireless modem, but make sure to check that before you buy it anyway) that will plug into one of your expansion ports; or if you have an internal wireless antenna inside computer#2 no need for the card.

g29andy
06-27-2009, 20:38
Huh?

1. get a wireless router.
2. Add a wireless adapter to the 2nd computer, if it doesn't have one already.

Oribis
06-27-2009, 20:56
Huh?

1. get a wireless router.
2. Add a wireless adapter to the 2nd computer, if it doesn't have one already.

What he said

IndyGunFreak
06-27-2009, 21:44
Huh?

1. get a wireless router.
2. Add a wireless adapter to the 2nd computer, if it doesn't have one already.

Agreed.. You can be pretty much brain dead and do this. It really depends on how far said computer is from the router, etc.. For the most part though, with today's technology, this should be no problem.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=3984786&CatId=2667

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=3173666&CatId=2704

When My sister moved in with me and it became clear she'd be here for the forseeable future, I decided to hook her computer up for her kids. My other computers are hooked up via ethernet cable I've ran through the house, but I didn''t want to have a small hole in the wall where her PC is when they move out. I already had a wireless router for my laptop. So all I needed was the wireless adapter from Belkin to let her on my network. It works great, and I've had no problems out of it.

If you set up a wireless network, read this...
http://www.practicallynetworked.com/support/wireless_secure.htm

In my opinion, 1-3 are the most important.. If you're gonna use WEP, I'd just not go wireless. It can be cracked in about 5min by your neighbors junior high aged kids. #5 is a great suggestion, and will help lock things down even further, but 1-3 will help a lot.

Where does your main conneciton come into the house, and how far away is the "second computer". If you don't want to use wireless, and you have good access to crawl space or attic to get near the PC.. just get a wired router, and run Cat6.

IGF

solomansousana
06-28-2009, 10:30
Check with your DSL provider, Verizon in Virginia will provide DSL subscribers with a wireless DSL modem if they ask for it, then all you need is a $45 usb ethernet adapter to get up and running.

DeLandSkyjumper
06-28-2009, 19:17
Thanks guys.

Not to fond of going wireless, though my PC does have a wireless card in it. the 2nd computer will only be about 10' away, separated by a wall, no concerns about drilling a hole.

So, picking up a wired router for the 2nd. puter, where do I need to hook it up to, router #1?

grokdesigns
06-28-2009, 21:19
Thanks guys.

Not to fond of going wireless, though my PC does have a wireless card in it. the 2nd computer will only be about 10' away, separated by a wall, no concerns about drilling a hole.

So, picking up a wired router for the 2nd. puter, where do I need to hook it up to, router #1?

Do you have an external DSL modem that the phone line goes into? If so, most have Ethernet ports, so you'd connect the Ethernet port of the DSL modem to the WAN port of the router. You'd then plug your computers into the LAN ports.

Sgt. Schultz
06-28-2009, 22:05
the 2nd computer will only be about 10' away, separated by a wall, no concerns about drilling a hole.

Since you will probably be purchasing a pre-made cable instead of making them yourself be sure that you buy a standard straight through patch cable and NOT a crossover cable.

Blitzer
06-29-2009, 01:06
either way you'll probably need another modem unless both computers have internal antennas and are capable of networking wirelessly with each other through a local area network (LAN), which would be pretty slow anyhow. but assuming they can't, you'd have to get another modem similar to the one you already have at computer#1 and you'd need another phone line open near computer#2 to plug that modem into...

or you can get a wireless router at comp#1 and broadcast the internet signal from that line to any computer anywhere in your home as long as comp#2 has a wireless pc card (which will usually come with a wireless modem, but make sure to check that before you buy it anyway) that will plug into one of your expansion ports; or if you have an internal wireless antenna inside computer#2 no need for the card.


Forgive my laughing but a 2nd DSL MODEM?! Only one DSL MODEM per line is allowed.

:rofl::dunno: :wow:

You can get a wired router, or check the MODEM for multiple ports, and run a CAT5 cable to the other PC. The most work.

Or check the MODEM to see if it is already a wireless model and put a wireless card or USB dongle in the other PC.

Or buy and setup a wireless router to the MODEM and add the wireless card or USB dongle to the other PC.

:supergrin:

IndyGunFreak
06-29-2009, 01:09
Thanks guys.

Not to fond of going wireless, though my PC does have a wireless card in it. the 2nd computer will only be about 10' away, separated by a wall, no concerns about drilling a hole.

So, picking up a wired router for the 2nd. puter, where do I need to hook it up to, router #1?

OK, no concens about drilling a hole then... Your setup will look something like this... As long as the second PC has some sort of ethernet card/port.. which it should, most PC's built in the last 7-8yrs have them. If your Modem has extra connection ports like grok mentioned, you can skip the router completely.

Phone Line>> Modem>>Router>>Port 1 to PC 1>>Port 2 to PC 2.

I would still use the Wireless Router I listed above, simply because if you ever want to go wireless, you'll have the option... You get a laptop, friend comes over w/ a laptop, whatever. I'm pretty sure you can disable the wireless output in the router settings. If you absolutely do not want anything wireless.... This was my first wired router, and it worked very well.. Storm knocked it out after I had it about 2.5yrs.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-Details.asp?EdpNo=4693168&sku=N100-2045&srkey=FVS114

Go to Best Buy or your local electronics store, and get some cat 6 cable to hook PC 2 up.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?skuId=6801268&st=cat6&lp=8&type=product&cp=1&id=1091099783878

Instead of the wireless device, and you'll be rolling.

IGF

IndyGunFreak
06-29-2009, 01:11
One other suggestion regarding a Wired (or wireless for that matter) router...

When you're searching for them, look in the specs of the router, and look for "SPI" or Stateful Packet Inspection. If you get a wireless router, make sure it has SPI in addition to WPA for its wireless security protocol.

IGF

dotsun
06-29-2009, 05:20
I'm hesitant to suggest this, but you might save yourself time, money and hassle by hiring a pro to set this up for you. My main reason for suggesting this is I'm still not sure of what your setup is, and I don't think you are sure either. No offense. :)

IndyGunFreak
06-29-2009, 06:37
I'm hesitant to suggest this, but you might save yourself time, money and hassle by hiring a pro to set this up for you. My main reason for suggesting this is I'm still not sure of what your setup is, and I don't think you are sure either. No offense. :)

True;... he's "presuming" he has DSL.. he might still be on Dial Up for all we know. :)

solomansousana
06-29-2009, 08:43
If you have a DSL modem, then more than likely you already have an extra line in at the back of the modem to allow another computer connection. Every DSL modem I've seen from Verizon and Cavalier have had 3 to 4 connections in the back allowing the addition of extra computers to the network. All you need to do is run the ethernet cable from the extra computer to the back of the DSL modem, and contact your DSL provider to find out if they allow two computers to be on at the same time.

I use a cable modem running into a Pent 4 Quad core server and have my home pc along with several laptops connected wirelessly. The wireless connection is using an encrypted WAP with 46 character security code and 128bit encryption, in addition, my access point is into a Watchguard Firebox® X750e Core dedicated hardware firewall.

IndyGunFreak
06-29-2009, 08:46
All you need to do is run the ethernet cable from the extra computer to the back of the DSL modem, and contact your DSL provider to find out if they allow two computers to be on at the same time.


Is there one that doesn't allow 2 PC's on at the same time? The router should take care of routing traffic to the other PC's.

IGF

solomansousana
06-29-2009, 09:09
Is there one that doesn't allow 2 PC's on at the same time? The router should take care of routing traffic to the other PC's.

IGF

My cable company allows only one computer per client to be online at any given time. I am having to pay an additional $10 per month to have multiple computers online. I tried at one point when I set up my home server and wireless points and while the server had access my desktop and laptops did not. Once I contacted the cable company and authorized the additional $10/month, within 2 min all my connected computers had access. The digital cable modem provided does have 3 ethernet ports in addition to the one being used by the Watchguard device. I'm not totally sure how Verizon and Cavalier DSL work on multiple computers on at the same time, but I presume they are just as greedy as my cable provider lol.

StayinTriggerHappy
06-29-2009, 13:32
Forgive my laughing but a 2nd DSL MODEM?! Only one DSL MODEM per line is allowed.

:rofl::dunno: :wow:

You can get a wired router, or check the MODEM for multiple ports, and run a CAT5 cable to the other PC. The most work.

Or check the MODEM to see if it is already a wireless model and put a wireless card or USB dongle in the other PC.

Or buy and setup a wireless router to the MODEM and add the wireless card or USB dongle to the other PC.

:supergrin:
that is funny because i've had two modems using two phonelines in my own home before...maybe it was just magic that made the second one work if it's impossible as you say.

IndyGunFreak
06-29-2009, 13:44
My cable company allows only one computer per client to be online at any given time. I am having to pay an additional $10 per month to have multiple computers online. I tried at one point when I set up my home server and wireless points and while the server had access my desktop and laptops did not. Once I contacted the cable company and authorized the additional $10/month, within 2 min all my connected computers had access. The digital cable modem provided does have 3 ethernet ports in addition to the one being used by the Watchguard device. I'm not totally sure how Verizon and Cavalier DSL work on multiple computers on at the same time, but I presume they are just as greedy as my cable provider lol.

Thats the first I've ever heard of something like that... I'd have promptly given them the finger and went elsewhere. I know Brighthouse has no such policy.

DeLandSkyjumper
06-29-2009, 18:22
True;... he's "presuming" he has DSL.. he might still be on Dial Up for all we know. :)


No, it's DSL, the modem/internet is thru Windstream or something to that effect. Only connections available on the back of the modem is 1 phone line port, 1 ethernet port and 1 USB port and the power supply.

IndyGunFreak
06-29-2009, 19:32
No, it's DSL, the modem/internet is thru Windstream or something to that effect. Only connections available on the back of the modem is 1 phone line port, 1 ethernet port and 1 USB port and the power supply.

OK... Follow the instructions I put in Post 11.. and that should get you going. Is your current PC hooked up via the USB port, or the ethernet port? If its hooked up via the USB port, you'll have a short cable that comes w/ the router, that will go from the modem to the router. Then get a short cable to go from the router to the PC 1, then get the longer cable(to run through the wall) to PC 2.

IGF

kc8ykd
06-29-2009, 19:59
Thats the first I've ever heard of something like that... I'd have promptly given them the finger and went elsewhere. I know Brighthouse has no such policy.

That's actually a really common practice. In a lot of cases, having multiple ip addresses (along with speed) delineates the difference between a standard 'home' account and 'business' accounts.

The way people get around that is by using a router (or a pc) running NAT, vs. plugging in a hub into the modem (cable/dsl/other). Since only the singular MAC address is being reported to the upstream gear there isn't any problems, and as you know, it helps protect the pc's and other devices from directed attacks. Static port mapping allows the end user to still provide services publically assuming the upstream provider doesn't filter or block those ports. You can get around this by shifting the ports up or down, assuming they aren't common things like 80 for web or 21/22 for ftp and the like, this works well for things like moving ssh to a different port tho.


We used to set the amount of ip addresses available for our DSL customers in the Redbacks we employed.

For our dialup customers, we'd set the number available in the RADIUS profile for the account.

For our dedicated circuit customers, we'd static route them however many ip's were in the contract at the 'last mile' (ospf would take care of announcing the ip's to the rest of our network, then bgp to the world) and if they needed more they could request (and pay) for them.

/hijack

Green_Manelishi
06-29-2009, 20:20
My cable company allows only one computer per client to be online at any given time. I am having to pay an additional $10 per month to have multiple computers online. I tried at one point when I set up my home server and wireless points and while the server had access my desktop and laptops did not. Once I contacted the cable company and authorized the additional $10/month, within 2 min all my connected computers had access. The digital cable modem provided does have 3 ethernet ports in addition to the one being used by the Watchguard device. I'm not totally sure how Verizon and Cavalier DSL work on multiple computers on at the same time, but I presume they are just as greedy as my cable provider lol.

Now I am doubly sure I made the wise choice by not allowing ComCrash near my wee hoos.

DeLandSkyjumper
06-30-2009, 18:09
OK... Follow the instructions I put in Post 11.. and that should get you going. Is your current PC hooked up via the USB port, or the ethernet port? If its hooked up via the USB port, you'll have a short cable that comes w/ the router, that will go from the modem to the router. Then get a short cable to go from the router to the PC 1, then get the longer cable(to run through the wall) to PC 2.

IGF

IGF, it's hooked up to the ethernet port, the usb is open. Thanks for putting up with me.

Chris

IndyGunFreak
06-30-2009, 18:22
IGF, it's hooked up to the ethernet port, the usb is open. Thanks for putting up with me.

Chris

Then that works out perfect, you'll just need the router, and the "long" ethernet cable.

Good luck

IGF

Kevin108
06-30-2009, 22:06
You don't need a wireless router for just two computers. If one or more doesn't have a wireless adapter, score a cheap one off eBay (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180374084285) and enable Internet Sharing (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306126) on the system hooked to the modem.

IndyGunFreak
07-01-2009, 02:41
You don't need a wireless router for just two computers. If one or more doesn't have a wireless adapter, score a cheap one off eBay (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180374084285) and enable Internet Sharing (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306126) on the system hooked to the modem.

I've never particularly cared for ICS...

1. it lacks flexibility if you decide to add a 3rd PC/Laptop for some reason (one reason I like the wireless router). Even if you opt for a wired router, when you add a 3rd PC all you need to do is run some more ethernet cable. The wireless router does give the greatest flexibility, and I'm not aware of any wireless router where you can't just turn the wireless signal off, and use it as a normal wired router.

2. If I'm not mistaken, in order for it to work, the PC that is the "host".. must be on. If you're gonna have that PC on, why not just use it? I'm assuming in the OP's situation, the cable is running through a wall to a guest or kid's bedroom.. but that's assumption. He said he wasn't to high on wireless, which is fine to...

Maybe back in the day when routers were really expensive, this was a good solution. Now, routers are cheap enough, that *I* think a router is a better solution.

dotsun
07-01-2009, 05:28
Then that works out perfect, you'll just need the router, and the "long" ethernet cable.

Good luck

IGF

^ Yes, do this. ^ Bonus is you'll get a firewall and much better future proofing vs ICS.

kc8ykd
07-01-2009, 07:34
I've never particularly cared for ICS...

1. it lacks flexibility if you decide to add a 3rd PC/Laptop for some reason (one reason I like the wireless router). Even if you opt for a wired router, when you add a 3rd PC all you need to do is run some more ethernet cable. The wireless router does give the greatest flexibility, and I'm not aware of any wireless router where you can't just turn the wireless signal off, and use it as a normal wired router.

2. If I'm not mistaken, in order for it to work, the PC that is the "host".. must be on. If you're gonna have that PC on, why not just use it? I'm assuming in the OP's situation, the cable is running through a wall to a guest or kid's bedroom.. but that's assumption. He said he wasn't to high on wireless, which is fine to...

Maybe back in the day when routers were really expensive, this was a good solution. Now, routers are cheap enough, that *I* think a router is a better solution.

ICS was developed during the days of dialup internet. Where, instead of having a phone line for each computer at an office or home (but they had a LAN, usually 10base2) ICS could be run to allow the entire network to access that link.

It required the accessing machine to be on 24/7 and didn't have any protections at all, firewall wise (back in the day). Now, we've got microsoft's firewall, which isn't bad (most 3'rd party 'firewalls' simply make config changes to it), but I'd still prefer to sit behind something running NAT, something preferably solid-state. Also, having to have a machine running 24/7 to allow access to another isn't generally the most efficient or convenient as you pointed out.

The price point of home routers/AP's makes them a pretty good deal for all the benefits they provide, like IGF pointed out, being able to turn on/off the wifi if it's not needed for some reason, being able to add lots of machines (wired and wireless), along with solid-state NAT are all things that are really hard to beat.

Plus, using a router/AP makes it easy to hook up things like Directv boxes and network printers (wireless and wifi), as opposed to going the ICS-route..

IndyGunFreak
07-01-2009, 07:51
^ Yes, do this. ^ Bonus is you'll get a firewall and much better future proofing vs ICS.

The Firewall was something I'd totally forgot was lacking w/ ICS. I guess you could use a software firewall, but I personally hate software firewalls, and don't use them. A good router/hardware firewall will protect people w/ common sense just fine.

IGF