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31F20
08-13-2009, 07:56
Anyone use a pizza stone?
I recently ordered a Pampered Chef rectangular pizza stone. The rectangular stone was the only flat model they have now. Everything else has 'handles' built in to the stone itself. I was told by my friend that its best to "season" the stone by baking greasy things for a while, like canned biscuits and cookies to build up a non stick surface before using it for pizza. Also, what about frozen pizzas? Is it ok to put a frozen pizza on there and put it in a hot oven (450F)?

Do you preheat the stone, then put the pizza on it? Or build the pizza on a peel, then transfer to a pre-heated stone?

Any suggestions or comments are appreciated.

308endurdebate
08-13-2009, 15:59
I use a pizza stone. Works much better than a pie sheet. Mine is round and has a metal carry attachment, you don't need if you don't want to use, but it makes it easier to take out of the oven.

For frozen pizza (or fresh) just slide on the the stone. I keep a flat pie sheet that I cut the lip off of one side and slide the pizza on with. If it is fresh, just make sure you have a nice coat of flour or corn meal on the bottom to slide with. Frozen ones just you can just place on if you like.

Yes, preheat the stone - I give it 10-15 more minutes once the oven says it's at temp because the stone takes longer to heat that the air.

SouthernGal
08-14-2009, 15:37
Been using one for over 10 years now. I also have the PChef baking bowl and deep dish baker, which combined make a stone "dutch oven". The PChef stones are all top of the line, IMO.

Your friend gave you good advice. I cook taquitos, pizza, chicken strips, buffalo wings (frozen premade ones), biscuits, rolls, garlic bread and lots of other things on mine. My stone has a surface that is BLACK and nothing sticks to it. DO cook oily stuff on it first to help it build up the coating that is desirable.

Frozen pizzas as well as fresh ones can be put on them and cooked once your stone is properly seasoned. Put the stone in the oven and allow it to preheat, then put your item on it and cook normally.

My stone "lives" in the oven and doesn't have any other place in my kitchen. It won't fit in any of my drawers anyway so it seemed logical to just leave it in there.

31F20
08-26-2009, 17:27
In an effort to "blacken" the stone I made pizza last night. Anybody else make pizza from scratch?

http://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00370.jpghttp://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00371.jpghttp://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00372.jpghttp://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00373.jpghttp://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00374.jpg

SouthernGal
08-27-2009, 12:45
Yes. I do. I can my own pizza sauce during the tomato growing season.

If you haven't tried the Hormel Turkey Pepperoni, it's really good. So is the ground Italian Turkey Sausage found in the frozen department at Wal-Mart and Kroger stores.

Tikiwolf
08-27-2009, 13:56
In an effort to "blacken" the stone I made pizza last night. Anybody else make pizza from scratch?

http://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00370.jpghttp://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00371.jpghttp://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00372.jpghttp://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00373.jpghttp://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00374.jpg
That's one good looking pie. I've had a stone in my oven for a little over 10 years. I usually just make frozen pizza, But once in a while a home made one is an extra treat.

gruntmedik
08-28-2009, 12:01
http://i851.photobucket.com/albums/ab80/corban_m/DSC00372.jpg

Looks like someone done ruined your shovel. :shocked:










:rofl:


Pizza looks great. :eat:

EODLRD
09-01-2009, 23:36
To fix up our stone for non-stick, I just rubbed olive oil on it. Worked great. I do this about once every 10 uses or so. Nothing sticks. But it will smoke up pretty good the first time you heat it up after putting the oil on.

Best way to do it is to wash it, then oil it and put it away. Ready to use the next time you need it.

31F20
09-02-2009, 08:26
Looks like someone done ruined your shovel. :shocked:










:rofl:


Pizza looks great. :eat:

Yeah, can you believe it? Some enterprising person actually flattened a shovel and resold it for three times as much! Dang.:rofl:I actually bought the thing.

slewfoot
09-02-2009, 08:57
Yes. I do. I can my own pizza sauce during the tomato growing season.

We just completed our spaghetti sauce canning for the year.

Never thought to make pizza sauce for canning. Maybe next year

Our pizza dough is store bought. We let it thaw and rise, then roll it. Most of my friends and relatives use pizza stones. I haven't tried one yet.

SouthernGal
09-02-2009, 09:05
We just completed our spaghetti sauce canning for the year.

Never thought to make pizza sauce for canning. Maybe next year

Our pizza dough is store bought. We let it thaw and rise, then roll it. Most of my friends and relatives use pizza stones. I haven't tried one yet.

I'll be doing my pizza sauce canning this weekend. The last of the tomatoes have been picked and they are being ripened indoors. I look to get some 20-25 half pints out of what is there.

I have bought storemade crust as well as made my own. I like the from scratch better but it's time consuming when I'm working full time.

31F20
09-02-2009, 11:15
I'll be doing my pizza sauce canning this weekend. The last of the tomatoes have been picked and they are being ripened indoors. I look to get some 20-25 half pints out of what is there.

I have bought storemade crust as well as made my own. I like the from scratch better but it's time consuming when I'm working full time.


I would like to try canning. Also gardening would be good. I do work full time and I can see these hobbies eating in to shooting time! LOL

SweetKnuckles
09-02-2009, 11:51
Been looking for a stone for awhile...Wally didn't have them, but Target did.

14.75 inch round with metal rack (handle)

Nine bucks. NOW I'll be makin me some pizzas on my BBQ!

31F20
09-02-2009, 14:22
Now go find yourself a peel and get to it. Peels make all the difference.

SouthernGal
09-08-2009, 07:21
Sorry for the delay. I did a lot of home canning this weekend, from fresh tomatoes (from my parent's garden) all the way to pizza sauce. I started working scalding the tomatoes at 8 in the morning on Saturday and didn't finish with my 36th halfpint of sauce came out of the water bath at about 4:00. I had a little bit of chopped up tomato left over and I put it in a foodsaver bag and vacuum sealed it and put it in the freezer for use in something like chili or soup.

My stone--it lives in my oven and as you can see, it's been used a LOT:

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q173/ratchinator/IMG_0197.jpg

Canning process:

Here's one of the batches in the water bath:

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q173/ratchinator/waterbath.jpg

And the finished product:

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q173/ratchinator/IMG_0198.jpg

http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q173/ratchinator/IMG_0199.jpg

31F20
09-08-2009, 11:57
Awesome!
Wow your stone is twice the size of mine. I like the seasoning. (patina?) I think we have the same oven. I am wanting to get more into home canning. I dont have anyone to learn from at the moment. Are you reusing jars and bands? Buying new lids? I think the lids are meant to be single use items. I have a boiling canner like yours (a huge pot) for high-acid canning. Im saving for a pressure cooker for low-acid canning. Right now the Hacth green chilis from New Mexico are in town. Id like to can a bushel for the winter. I also want to can a home made bbq sauce and some jalapeno jelly for Xmas presents.

I think we should start a Cast Iron thread next. Pics, stories, and recipes all about Cast Iron cookware. :upeyes:

SouthernGal
09-08-2009, 12:47
Awesome!
Wow your stone is twice the size of mine. I like the seasoning. (patina?) I think we have the same oven. I am wanting to get more into home canning. I dont have anyone to learn from at the moment. Are you reusing jars and bands? Buying new lids? I think the lids are meant to be single use items. I have a boiling canner like yours (a huge pot) for high-acid canning. Im saving for a pressure cooker for low-acid canning. Right now the Hacth green chilis from New Mexico are in town. Id like to can a bushel for the winter. I also want to can a home made bbq sauce and some jalapeno jelly for Xmas presents.

I think we should start a Cast Iron thread next. Pics, stories, and recipes all about Cast Iron cookware. :upeyes:


Yes, my stone is pretty large and thick, but it is also quite old. I know I got it before I married, so it would have been purchased in 1995 or 1996. I got it when they first came out on the market. It even came with directions on how to take it back to "new" by using a belt sander on it. Of course, I've never taken it back to "new" state. Nothing sticks to it. When I use it, I scrape it clean and put it back into the oven, which is where it "lives".

My oven is a GE flat top. While I actually prefer gas because it's easier to control the heat, this thing is a breeze to clean and still looks brand new even though it is 6 years old.

I own both a pressure cooker and a canner. The canner in the picture above is my mom's though because hers is larger than mine is. I use my pressure cooker primarily for cooking meats. I can cook an entire chicken, bones and all in about 20 minutes in a pressure cooker. Lots of people won't use them because they pose some dangers if you don't know what you're doing, but if you read and follow the directions, they're a great thing to hurry along your cooking.

I reuse my jars and bands. Lids have to be replaced every time you can something new and cannot be reused. What you're doing is putting food in a sterilized (clean) jar, then capping down the lid with a band. When you submerse the jars in the boiling water bath, it kills the bacteria inside the jar. For this pizza sauce, processing time in the bath was 40 minutes. So, for 40 minutes, these jars were submersed in boiling water. When you remove them from the boiling water bath and place them to cool, the heat from inside causes a vacuum to be created and the lid gets pulled down and the jar sealed. I leave my jars overnight to cool, then remove the band the next day and put the canned food away.

Home canning is fast becoming a lost art. I don't know too many people who still do home canning, but I've been doing it for years. I feel it is stupid to let organic "free" food go to waste. My mom cans relish, pickles, green beans, salsa, tomatoes, and pizza sauce. We used to make jellies and jams as well, but the process there is more involved and difficult. We also freeze corn, peas, squash, zucchini, and green peppers. I should mention that canning is expensive to start up because of the cost of the jars, so keeping up with your jars is pretty important.

As for cast iron, I own plenty of it, but I inherited most of it. The pan I use for cornbread is about 100 years old and belonged to my great grandmother.

31F20
09-08-2009, 13:18
Nice!
Well Im just learning this dying art. I agree that wasting fresh free food is not right. Garden fresh produce is real nice to have. Ill remember to post pics when I make the sauce. Your 100 yr old cast iron pan would make a sweet pic in the new cast iron thread!
Thanks for posting!

About $8 for 12 half pint jars w/ lids and bands at Walmart!

SouthernGal
09-08-2009, 13:41
Right now, our local Wal-Mart has a closeout sale on jars, lids and bands because it is the end of the season. Try to buy jars (if you know you plan on canning) when the season is ending and they go on special. That's when they are cheapest.

I also have found jars in the past at estate sales in the area (I live in MS). Some of the older people canned and are passing away and relatives get rid of things like this by the boxload. Some of my quart jars were from my grandmother's estate.

I'll get pics of my cast iron when the thread gets started. I've got several pieces.

EUPHER49
09-08-2009, 14:29
I use a stone also. I heat the oven as hot as it'll get on "Bake" then the pizza is transferred from the peel to the stone. Yes, I make fresh dough, and except for rise time doesn't take too much time to make.

I also preserve tomatoes, Romas, but I cut them in half and scoop out the clear gook and seeds then place them on a cookie sheet and bake for a bit to soften them for skin and pulp removal. The pulp goes into a sauce pan and simmers for a couple of hours then gets pureed and put into freezer bags and frozen. I only use a bit of Kosher salt for seasoning and then I can season it later for what I want to make. The sauce is so flavorful it could stand on its own for most any dish.

My next stab at DIY is fresh mozzarella...it's not too difficult and minimal equipment is needed.

I make my pizza with fresh dough, sliced Roma tomatoes, fresh basil, and fresh mozzarella. Yummy! Oh go ahead and add toppings of your choice, of course :drool:

31F20
09-08-2009, 17:08
I use a stone also. I heat the oven as hot as it'll get on "Bake" then the pizza is transferred from the peel to the stone. Yes, I make fresh dough, and except for rise time doesn't take too much time to make.

I also preserve tomatoes, Romas, but I cut them in half and scoop out the clear gook and seeds then place them on a cookie sheet and bake for a bit to soften them for skin and pulp removal. The pulp goes into a sauce pan and simmers for a couple of hours then gets pureed and put into freezer bags and frozen. I only use a bit of Kosher salt for seasoning and then I can season it later for what I want to make. The sauce is so flavorful it could stand on its own for most any dish.

My next stab at DIY is fresh mozzarella...it's not too difficult and minimal equipment is needed.

I make my pizza with fresh dough, sliced Roma tomatoes, fresh basil, and fresh mozzarella. Yummy! Oh go ahead and add toppings of your choice, of course :drool:

Nice!
Sounds great. I would like to start garden next season. We have a landscaped terrace about three feet wide running along the back fence that could be transformed. Right now it is over grown with weeds. It would be awesome to have fresh herbs, tomatoes, zucchini, jalapenos, onion; the list goes on. I just have to put in a little time and effort. Too late for this year. Our neighbors had us stocked with tomatoes and zuchs. Perhaps we should grow complimentary vegetables since they have so much?
One question. I find it difficult and disastrous to move the fresh pizza in the counter/peel/stone process. Either it is way too hard to get it off the peel on to the stone, or it sicks to the counter so bad that i cant get it on the peel. I try to use way too much cornmeal/flour on the work surface, but it still sticks. I even flour up the peel as much as possible. I guess this could be from rolling dough on the peel itself or rolling it out on the counter top. Anyway, any suggestions?
Thanks

31F20
09-08-2009, 17:11
Right now, our local Wal-Mart has a closeout sale on jars, lids and bands because it is the end of the season. Try to buy jars (if you know you plan on canning) when the season is ending and they go on special. That's when they are cheapest.

I also have found jars in the past at estate sales in the area (I live in MS). Some of the older people canned and are passing away and relatives get rid of things like this by the boxload. Some of my quart jars were from my grandmother's estate.

I'll get pics of my cast iron when the thread gets started. I've got several pieces.

Good call on the Walmart closeout deal. Ill have to try to get there and see. Maybe Craigslist has local estate sales advertised? Ill check it out.
Cast iron thread is here. :cool:

EUPHER49
09-08-2009, 20:41
Nice!
Sounds great. I would like to start garden next season. We have a landscaped terrace about three feet wide running along the back fence that could be transformed. Right now it is over grown with weeds. It would be awesome to have fresh herbs, tomatoes, zucchini, jalapenos, onion; the list goes on. I just have to put in a little time and effort. Too late for this year. Our neighbors had us stocked with tomatoes and zuchs. Perhaps we should grow complimentary vegetables since they have so much?
One question. I find it difficult and disastrous to move the fresh pizza in the counter/peel/stone process. Either it is way too hard to get it off the peel on to the stone, or it sicks to the counter so bad that i cant get it on the peel. I try to use way too much cornmeal/flour on the work surface, but it still sticks. I even flour up the peel as much as possible. I guess this could be from rolling dough on the peel itself or rolling it out on the counter top. Anyway, any suggestions?
Thanks

I roll my dough out on the counter, then dust the peel with cornmeal. I put the dough on the peel before adding toppings and shake the peel a bit to make sure the dough slides around. I add toppings and do the same thing after they're on and usually have no problems with sticking. When I put the pizza onto the stone I jostle the peel a bit until the pizza moves a bit and then yank little by little until it's off the peel and onto the stone. Did that make sense?

31F20
09-09-2009, 06:05
Yes. Thank you. Ill try to keep up with pizza sliding around on the peel. Best to keep everything lubricated with cornmeal and moving around for smoother transitions.