So, I've been talking to a recruiter..... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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oneofthose
08-30-2009, 22:07
I'm 36 years old, and considering enlisting. It's been nagging at me for over 10 years. My motivations include providing for my family, serving my country, and completing my education.

Anyone here done this at my age? Any feedback regarding army life, what to expect, working with a recruiter, etc. appreciated.

5 OH GLOCK
08-30-2009, 22:11
:countingsheep::countingsheep::usmc::patriot:

oneofthose
08-31-2009, 06:15
Anything you're willing to share about your experience would be greatly appreciated.

chuckman
08-31-2009, 09:02
I wasn't your age, but I was in my late 20s. Even then, I was considered the 'old man.' I joined the Navy, and though the RDC's (Navy-speak for drill instructor) would argue otherwise, I got a little more latitude and a little less crap, I think, because of my age. It was a little weird to be around much more senior people who were younger than me.

The Maggy
08-31-2009, 09:05
Recruiters are like used car salesmen. They will tell you want you want to hear if they think it is going to get you to sign on the line. That being said, if you know its what you want to do then go for it. I've had some older men work for me in the past and I've worked with some older men. As long as you're in good shape and don't expect special treatment you would fit right in.

To expand on what chuckman is saying, I was 21 and I had a guy that was 37 or 38 working for me. It took a minute to get used to but older people tend to recieve more resposibility due to their maturity in life.

5 OH GLOCK
08-31-2009, 09:05
Bump to the top!! I know people can help this guy out..

oneofthose
08-31-2009, 21:16
It was a little weird to be around much more senior people who were younger than me.

One of the guys in the recruiting office asked me if I thought that might be a problem. I can't imagine it would be a "problem", so I said no. I guess it could be a bit wierd at times, perhaps.

I hadn't really considered that I might get a bit more latitude because of my age. Actually, I thought it more likely to be the other way around.

Did your younger peers, equal in rank, treat you differently?

paperairplane
08-31-2009, 21:22
Do you have a degree? Are you going in as a private? If so, there is going to be a lot of generation gap. I am 35 and manage 22-25 year olds, I cannot imagine being a contemporary with 18 year olds and taking orders from a 22 year old 2nd lt.

oneofthose
08-31-2009, 21:23
Recruiters are like used car salesmen. They will tell you want you want to hear if they think it is going to get you to sign on the line. That being said, if you know its what you want to do then go for it. I've had some older men work for me in the past and I've worked with some older men. As long as you're in good shape and don't expect special treatment you would fit right in.

To expand on what chuckman is saying, I was 21 and I had a guy that was 37 or 38 working for me. It took a minute to get used to but older people tend to recieve more resposibility due to their maturity in life.

A friend who has served in another branch strongly suggested getting certain things in writing. Is that really done? Isn't everything pretty much "in writing"? Exactly what type of things should a potential recruit ask for in writing? Somehow, the thought of asking for something "in writing" would seem to say "I don't really trust you".

Army66
08-31-2009, 21:40
Can't speak to basic, I retired at 39. I can say that when I had someone who was older assigned to my section, I would tend to look to them to keep the younger guys in line. Basic might be tough, but after basic it should not be a big issue. Get everything in writing, recruiters are a lot like used car salesman.:cool:

oneofthose
08-31-2009, 21:56
Do you have a degree? Are you going in as a private? If so, there is going to be a lot of generation gap. I am 35 and manage 22-25 year olds, I cannot imagine being a contemporary with 18 year olds and taking orders from a 22 year old 2nd lt.

I do not have a degree, furthering my education is one of my goals.

At a previous job, I was often in charge of people older than me. In some cases, I could sense their discomfort in the beginning, and almost always seemed to build a good working relationship with them, and inevitably learned from them too. Hopefully those experiences would help me.

I guess I'm more concerned how my family would adapt the change in lifestyle. My wife has no family or close friends in the military to talk to. She's mostly forming expectation based on our visit with the recruiter, and info on the army website.

oneofthose
08-31-2009, 21:59
Get everything in writing, recruiters are a lot like used car salesman.:cool:

I'm hearing that more and more. What types of things should I watch for, that aren't already in writing?

Army66
08-31-2009, 22:23
Basically everything. You are signing a contract when you enlist, and it is usually for three years of your life. Make sure that everthing that a recruiter is promising you is in writing, the MOS that you are going for, schooling, first assignment, etc. It is a good career and you will be surprised at what you find yourself doing, like they say, its an adventure.

5 OH GLOCK
08-31-2009, 22:24
Again back to the top!!!!!

This guy needs H E L P and he is counting on the GLOCK community for advice...


So these People that have served H E L P O U T.....

oneofthose
08-31-2009, 22:38
Thanks for all your replies. I'll check back again tomorrow.

5 OH GLOCK
08-31-2009, 22:39
B u m p

betyourlife
08-31-2009, 23:08
I hate to go against the grain on this one, especially since I too have thoughts of enlisting from time to time. But I don't know that enlisting with a family (wife/kids) is the best thing to do. Being in the military IMO is best when you are single and have no attachments for moves, deployments, etc. and can focus rather than be distracted.

Also, members of the military have a considerably higher divorce rate. I don't know what's more important to you, your family or joining the military?

5 OH GLOCK
09-01-2009, 07:19
I hate to go against the grain on this one, especially since I too have thoughts of enlisting from time to time. But I don't know that enlisting with a family (wife/kids) is the best thing to do. Being in the military IMO is best when you are single and have no attachments for moves, deployments, etc. and can focus rather than be distracted.

Also, members of the military have a considerably higher divorce rate. I don't know what's more important to you, your family or joining the military?


:thumbsup: :agree:

chuckman
09-01-2009, 08:11
One of the guys in the recruiting office asked me if I thought that might be a problem. I can't imagine it would be a "problem", so I said no. I guess it could be a bit wierd at times, perhaps.

I hadn't really considered that I might get a bit more latitude because of my age. Actually, I thought it more likely to be the other way around.

Did your younger peers, equal in rank, treat you differently?

My younger peers actually treated me as a 'father figure' even though I wasn't that much older. A lot of guys would come to me for advice, mentoring, etc. I always got a lot more responsibility because of my age, which helped me get great evals and thus promoted at a bit of a faster clip. One suggestion is look at the reserves or Nat Guard. In today's climate if you hold the right MOS and you really like it, you can go 'active' without much problem.

chuckman
09-01-2009, 08:13
I hate to go against the grain on this one, especially since I too have thoughts of enlisting from time to time. But I don't know that enlisting with a family (wife/kids) is the best thing to do. Being in the military IMO is best when you are single and have no attachments for moves, deployments, etc. and can focus rather than be distracted.

Also, members of the military have a considerably higher divorce rate. I don't know what's more important to you, your family or joining the military?

There is some truth to this. YOU aren't joining the mil, your entire family is joining the mil. If your wife isn't onboard, you will have problems. This is one reason I switched to the reserve, to make life more compatible for my family.

deadday
09-01-2009, 08:19
Basically everything. You are signing a contract when you enlist, and it is usually for three years of your life. Make sure that everthing that a recruiter is promising you is in writing, the MOS that you are going for, schooling, first assignment, etc. It is a good career and you will be surprised at what you find yourself doing, like they say, its an adventure.

Negative. It is ALWAYS for 8 years of your life*. No matter what contract you sign (2, 3, 4, 5 year), you will spend 8 years in the military. You've got your Active/Reserve/Guard time (the amount you actually sign for) then whatever time is left to make 8 you spend IRR...ex- 2 years Active, 6 years IRR...


*barring any kind of seperation for medical, chapter, or judicial action..

chuckman
09-01-2009, 08:20
Basically everything. You are signing a contract when you enlist, and it is usually for three years of your life. Make sure that everthing that a recruiter is promising you is in writing, the MOS that you are going for, schooling, first assignment, etc. It is a good career and you will be surprised at what you find yourself doing, like they say, its an adventure.

Not sure how the Army does things, but in my experience, the recruiter will often offer MOS or duty station, but often not both (in the Navy, if you want to be a Boatswain's Mate, you ain't getting a shore duty station!).

chuckman
09-01-2009, 08:21
Negative. It is ALWAYS for 8 years of your life*. No matter what contract you sign (2, 3, 4, 5 year), you will spend 8 years in the military. You've got your Active/Reserve/Guard time (the amount you actually sign for) then whatever time is left to make 8 you spend IRR...ex- 2 years Active, 6 years IRR...


*barring any kind of seperation for medical, chapter, or judicial action..

Truer words have never been spoken. Recruiters often, um, gloss over that detail, and it often gets people into a little bit of trouble down the road.

deadday
09-01-2009, 08:23
A friend who has served in another branch strongly suggested getting certain things in writing. Is that really done? Isn't everything pretty much "in writing"? Exactly what type of things should a potential recruit ask for in writing? Somehow, the thought of asking for something "in writing" would seem to say "I don't really trust you".

Examples of things to 'get in writing':

-any rank above E1 they offer
-choice of duty station
-HRAP
-any advanced schools offered (Airborne, Air Assault, RIP, LVN, etc depending on your MOS)
-YOUR BONUS

...asking for paperwork is not saying 'I don't trust you', it's saying 'I know how things work in the real world'....if it is not written down, it doesn't happen, didn't exist, was never said....

deadday
09-01-2009, 08:26
I hate to go against the grain on this one, especially since I too have thoughts of enlisting from time to time. But I don't know that enlisting with a family (wife/kids) is the best thing to do. Being in the military IMO is best when you are single and have no attachments for moves, deployments, etc. and can focus rather than be distracted.

Also, members of the military have a considerably higher divorce rate. I don't know what's more important to you, your family or joining the military?

Not really, last I checked, we were sitting right around the national average of 55%....I joined with a family and was a few years older than everyone else (enlisted at 22)..

deadday
09-01-2009, 08:28
My younger peers actually treated me as a 'father figure' even though I wasn't that much older. A lot of guys would come to me for advice, mentoring, etc. I always got a lot more responsibility because of my age, which helped me get great evals and thus promoted at a bit of a faster clip. One suggestion is look at the reserves or Nat Guard. In today's climate if you hold the right MOS and you really like it, you can go 'active' without much problem.

Not true. It is getting harder and harder to transition to AD. Guard and Reserve units are deploying just as often, sometimes more often, than AD units and they need the bodies. Getting a release from your Guard/Reserve unit to go active could be a very long and painful process. Don't join the Guard/Res. expecting to go active at your leisure, and don't join the Guard/Res. expecting to dodge deployments.



eta- I suppose I should clarify, all of my experience is in dealing with the Army, other branches could be different..

glockster99
09-01-2009, 08:41
Please read whatever you sign, word for word..........DON'T JUST SIGN THE PIECE OF PAPER!......

chuckman
09-01-2009, 09:35
Not true. It is getting harder and harder to transition to AD. Guard and Reserve units are deploying just as often, sometimes more often, than AD units and they need the bodies. Getting a release from your Guard/Reserve unit to go active could be a very long and painful process. Don't join the Guard/Res. expecting to go active at your leisure, and don't join the Guard/Res. expecting to dodge deployments.



eta- I suppose I should clarify, all of my experience is in dealing with the Army, other branches could be different..

Yeah, again, that's why I have been adding that my perspective is that of being in the Navy. Things work differently for us. Not better, mind you, just different.

md2lgyk
09-01-2009, 10:04
Have you carefully considered the potential difference between your salary now and what you'll make in the military? And where you'll live? I don't know how it is now, but in my day E-2s and -3s were pretty low on the totem pole for military housing. Heck, back then they couldn't even get married without permission.

As others have mentioned, your wife needs to be fully on board with this. I had been in the Navy 4 years and already re-enlisted when I met my first wife. In the 4 more years I stayed in, she never adjusted to the military lifestyle.

johnydoe
09-01-2009, 19:29
I've heard there are a lot of older recruits in BCT nowadays with the bad economy. You probably won't be the oldest guy in your company...

deadday
09-01-2009, 19:31
I've heard there are a lot of older recruits in BCT nowadays with the bad economy. You probably won't be the oldest guy in your company...

Oldest guy when I went through was 39. Youngest was just days over 17. I was 22-23

oneofthose
09-01-2009, 20:10
I hate to go against the grain on this one, especially since I too have thoughts of enlisting from time to time. But I don't know that enlisting with a family (wife/kids) is the best thing to do. Being in the military IMO is best when you are single and have no attachments for moves, deployments, etc. and can focus rather than be distracted.

Also, members of the military have a considerably higher divorce rate. I don't know what's more important to you, your family or joining the military?

This is definitely something we've had lengthy talks about. One thing I have not mentioned, is that my present job has me away from home 2-4 nights a week. I know that doesn't compare to being apart for 6 months or more, but my wife is used to making decisions and taking care of things when I'm not home.

Other than that part of it, we feel like we're in a good position to make a change like this. We have zero debt, except our mortgage, which is far less than we could sell for, even in this market. I guess what I'm saying here, is we don't have a lot of the stresses young(er) married couples often have.

oneofthose
09-01-2009, 20:13
I've heard there are a lot of older recruits in BCT nowadays with the bad economy. You probably won't be the oldest guy in your company...

The recruiter mentioned a recent enlistee that was a year older than me. I've wondered if the economy has more people thinking about the military. The recruiter also mentioned that several jobs were "pretty much full" but that could change.

oneofthose
09-01-2009, 20:19
Have you carefully considered the potential difference between your salary now and what you'll make in the military? And where you'll live? I don't know how it is now, but in my day E-2s and -3s were pretty low on the totem pole for military housing. Heck, back then they couldn't even get married without permission.

As others have mentioned, your wife needs to be fully on board with this. I had been in the Navy 4 years and already re-enlisted when I met my first wife. In the 4 more years I stayed in, she never adjusted to the military lifestyle.

We live pretty lean right now anyway. We definitely wouldn't be able to save as much as we are now though.

I've heard more than once that there could be a waiting list for base housing, but I've also heard that there was a lot of new housing built in the last year or so.

Does having a family carry any weight if you're waiting for housing?

deadday
09-01-2009, 20:22
The recruiter mentioned a recent enlistee that was a year older than me. I've wondered if the economy has more people thinking about the military. The recruiter also mentioned that several jobs were "pretty much full" but that could change.

pretty much full is slang for the Army needs more (insert some job other than the one you are interested in)...just ignore it, tell the recruiter you'll have to see what the career counselor at MEPS can do....

The CC will feed you the same line to start with, usually saying 'it may have more slots next month, we just don't know', at which point you say, 'well, thank you for your time sir, I'll check back next month', he then says 'hang on a sec, let me make a call', and then 'wait, ok, I just called a buddy of mine, and we can get you in' ......

Don't take any of it personally, they're just doing their jobs, and most recruiters I know hate it...They're salesmen for 3 years, then they get the **** back to a line unit and do their jobs.....

oneofthose
09-01-2009, 20:24
One suggestion is look at the reserves or Nat Guard. In today's climate if you hold the right MOS and you really like it, you can go 'active' without much problem.

The Guard was actually my first stop, but I'm too old. They just lowered the maximum age a few months ago.

I was told the Reserves aren't taking anyone right now, which I didn't quite understand. Could that be wrong?

deadday
09-01-2009, 20:27
The Guard was actually my first stop, but I'm too old. They just lowered the maximum age a few months ago.

I was told the Reserves aren't taking anyone right now, which I didn't quite understand. Could that be wrong?

Same problem Mrs Dead hit...she wanted to join the TX Guard but was a month late....

It is possible that the Reserves are on a freeze, but I doubt it....The Reserves have their own recruiters, pull out the yellow pages and give 'em a call....

oneofthose
09-01-2009, 20:28
Many, many thanks for everyones reply's. I'll keep checking back.

Army66
09-01-2009, 21:31
I hate to go against the grain on this one, especially since I too have thoughts of enlisting from time to time. But I don't know that enlisting with a family (wife/kids) is the best thing to do. Being in the military IMO is best when you are single and have no attachments for moves, deployments, etc. and can focus rather than be distracted.

Also, members of the military have a considerably higher divorce rate. I don't know what's more important to you, your family or joining the military?
I would agree, the military is not for all wives, our divorce rate is always high, it takes a very special woman to put up with all the long hours, moves, sometimes on very short notice and also the times that you might be away from home. She has to be very strong and independent to survive the environment. Having a family definately makes this a harder decision, and one that has to be a joint decision if you are going do this. For the young kids on their own its not bad but it can be very difficult for a family. I had to counsel several people who were having a difficult time adjusting to the Army. It is not a job for everyone.

Army66
09-01-2009, 21:40
We live pretty lean right now anyway. We definitely wouldn't be able to save as much as we are now though.

I've heard more than once that there could be a waiting list for base housing, but I've also heard that there was a lot of new housing built in the last year or so.

Does having a family carry any weight if you're waiting for housing?
Did not see this one at first. Unless it has changed, to qualify for housing on post, you had to be an E5 which takes time to get to. Young families normally do not qualify for housing, so then you are at the mercy of the people renting housing around a post. And from experience, a lot of them are out to take a GI for everything they can get. I can think of two posts I was on that we had to put some of the landlords off limits for sub-standard housing and over priced rent. I have seen waiting lists of over a year to get on post housing, it depends on where you are at.

Something else you did not mention, what kind of a job are you looking for? If you dicide to do this, make sure it something that there is a demand for on the outside. Generally combat arms MOS'es don't have a lot of demand in civilian life.

oneofthose
09-03-2009, 19:27
Something else you did not mention, what kind of a job are you looking for? If you dicide to do this, make sure it something that there is a demand for on the outside. Generally combat arms MOS'es don't have a lot of demand in civilian life.

I'm undecided as to the Job. A job with a somewhat predictable schedule (if there is such a thing in the Army) would be ideal, while trying to take classes full time.

I plan to pursue a degree in criminal justice, so Military Police is something I'm considering, perhaps hoping to get into investigations, or even something clerical.

betyourlife
09-03-2009, 19:36
Not really, last I checked, we were sitting right around the national average of 55%....I joined with a family and was a few years older than everyone else (enlisted at 22)..

The national average is actually around 33%. The commonly quoted divorce statistic of 51% of all marriages end in divorce is false. That is the number of second marriages that end in divorce.

Members of the military have a significantly higher divorce rate.

31F20
09-04-2009, 09:44
Go for it.
Good Luck.

U-phorik407
09-04-2009, 11:08
Tagged for update, this is an interesting topic, I'm 26 and just on the verge of getting married, yet I have had an itch to join. Best of luck wherever this takes you.

deadday
09-04-2009, 13:17
Did not see this one at first. Unless it has changed, to qualify for housing on post, you had to be an E5 which takes time to get to. Young families normally do not qualify for housing, so then you are at the mercy of the people renting housing around a post. And from experience, a lot of them are out to take a GI for everything they can get. I can think of two posts I was on that we had to put some of the landlords off limits for sub-standard housing and over priced rent. I have seen waiting lists of over a year to get on post housing, it depends on where you are at.

Something else you did not mention, what kind of a job are you looking for? If you dicide to do this, make sure it something that there is a demand for on the outside. Generally combat arms MOS'es don't have a lot of demand in civilian life.

Anyone with a family can apply for on post housing...my neighbor on the right was an E6, neighbor on the left an E1 student.....the wait list is different at every post, at Fort Sam, it is about a year for enlisted housing..

deadday
09-04-2009, 13:20
The national average is actually around 33%. The commonly quoted divorce statistic of 51% of all marriages end in divorce is false. That is the number of second marriages that end in divorce.

Members of the military have a significantly higher divorce rate.

..seems we're both wrong, looks like 6% as of 2004 (http://msnbcmedia4.msn.com/i/msnbc/Components/Art/NEWS/050701/ARMY_DIVORCES.gif)


3.8% in 2008 (http://usmilitary.about.com/od/divorce/Military_Divorce_Separation_Issues.htm)

Airman 28
09-04-2009, 14:01
If you are really wanting to get in, get in while you still can. The base i'm from isn't even taking any new recruits. They're actually recruiting for another base over 75 miles away. On top of top of that recruiting standards seem to be getting tougher and tougher.

Airman 28
09-04-2009, 14:22
You know the saying when it comes to deployments :

Distance does to marriage what wind does to fire. It extinguishes the weak and feeds the strong.

deadday
09-04-2009, 16:11
You know the saying when it comes to deployments :

Distance does to marriage what wind does to fire. It extinguishes the weak and feeds the strong.

Yeah, those 6 month deployments must be hell....

Bren
09-05-2009, 00:12
I've heard there are a lot of older recruits in BCT nowadays with the bad economy. You probably won't be the oldest guy in your company...

I've had plenty of privates in their 40's in basic training. It's not surprising that they usually come out on top with mental tasks and leadership, but what is surprising is that they also generally beat the teenagers physically. Pretty much every 40+ privates I've seen, in my platoons or others, has been highly regarded by his drill sergeants and has ended up with platoon guide and squad leader jobs. I recall in a platoon last summer that our platoon guide was an E2 41 year old ex-truck driver and the Assistant Platoon Guide was a yale graduate who dropped out of law school to come in on an oCS contract. I kept trying to get the OCS kid to learn to be half the soldier and leader the truck driver was.

android
09-26-2009, 00:52
I am 30 and thinking about this as well. I am divorced , no kids..etc

(sorry if this is a hijack)

I have worked in various brokerage firms throughout my career and have been laid off 3 times in 5 years since 9/11. I have always wanted to join the military..but money, a cushy lifestyle, freedom, etc have always stopped me.
But then I realized I have had all of these things because of the people who protect our freedom.

I also just feel like I would be starting way behind the curve at age 30. I almost enlisted in the Marines at 18, but was convinced by my parents that college and a brokerage license would secure a future for myself and future family.

Looking back I am not sure that was correct. I am in average shape, but that could change in 6 weeks. I was told by several of my friends in the USMC and Navy that it would not be worth it and I would not see any sort of satisfaction until 40. I have both my BSB, MBA, and S7/63.

I just wanted a secure place of employment as well as a chance to serve my country.

Reheater
09-27-2009, 00:03
I am 30 and thinking about this as well. I am divorced , no kids..etc

(sorry if this is a hijack)

I have worked in various brokerage firms throughout my career and have been laid off 3 times in 5 years since 9/11. I have always wanted to join the military..but money, a cushy lifestyle, freedom, etc have always stopped me.
But then I realized I have had all of these things because of the people who protect our freedom.

I also just feel like I would be starting way behind the curve at age 30. I almost enlisted in the Marines at 18, but was convinced by my parents that college and a brokerage license would secure a future for myself and future family.

Looking back I am not sure that was correct. I am in average shape, but that could change in 6 weeks. I was told by several of my friends in the USMC and Navy that it would not be worth it and I would not see any sort of satisfaction until 40. I have both my BSB, MBA, and S7/63.

I just wanted a secure place of employment as well as a chance to serve my country.

Your only as old as you feel. When I went through basic the oldest guy in my platoon was 37. I was older than both of my Drill Sgts at 26. It was fun smoking the piss out of mouthy 18-20 year old guys on a daily basis.

Rob_0811
09-29-2009, 07:26
I am 30 and thinking about this as well. I am divorced , no kids..etc

(sorry if this is a hijack)

I have worked in various brokerage firms throughout my career and have been laid off 3 times in 5 years since 9/11. I have always wanted to join the military..but money, a cushy lifestyle, freedom, etc have always stopped me.
But then I realized I have had all of these things because of the people who protect our freedom.

I also just feel like I would be starting way behind the curve at age 30. I almost enlisted in the Marines at 18, but was convinced by my parents that college and a brokerage license would secure a future for myself and future family.

Looking back I am not sure that was correct. I am in average shape, but that could change in 6 weeks. I was told by several of my friends in the USMC and Navy that it would not be worth it and I would not see any sort of satisfaction until 40. I have both my BSB, MBA, and S7/63.

I just wanted a secure place of employment as well as a chance to serve my country.

Go to OCS.

We need good officers.

robin303
10-01-2009, 19:06
I might have missed it it but a lot of the cut offs in the Army is 32. So what age did the Recruitor say. I might be wrong since I have been out for about 10 years. What MOS do you want. The only thing I know is the only way to move up fast in rank is 11B. [Infantry] If I could do it all over again it would be Coast Guard.

deadday
10-01-2009, 19:19
I might have missed it it but a lot of the cut offs in the Army is 32. So what age did the Recruitor say. I might be wrong since I have been out for about 10 years. What MOS do you want. The only thing I know is the only way to move up fast in rank is 11B. [Infantry] If I could do it all over again it would be Coast Guard.

I believe it is somewhere around 40 for active duty right now and 37 for NG/R...and if you are prior service, you can waive one year of your age per year of service....when I enlisted in 05, we had several guys in their high 30s and one that I'm pretty sure was 40...

JBarbaresi
10-02-2009, 21:24
guys, i spent 4 years in 3/75 and then volunteered for recruiting duty for a change of pace. i've been an army recruiter since mid 2005 and currently am in charge of a recruiting station in stafford, va. before everyone jumps down my throat, there are some bad apples out there but army recruiters for the most part are straight forward with their applicants, they HAVE to be. everything you are getting into, from your MOS to your length of service and enlistment bonus... its all included in a contract for you.

yes everyone has an 8 year MSO obligation whether you enlist for 2 years of active duty or 6, the remainder is spent in the IRR (idividual ready reserve). i don't know if anyone has been watching the news lately, but the economy isn't exactly doing great, which has opened a flood-gate of people trying to enlist into the military. currently every single branch is over strengthed so we are extremely restricted as to what qualifications applicants must meet for enlistment. many people are no longer receiving enlistment bonuses only because the Army doesn't need a whole lot of people, but again before you commit to anything you will know whether you are or not, as well as what job you will be doing.

if anyone has any specific question please feel free to pm me or post it on here if you are more comfortable keeping it public for others to "fact check", since all recruiters are nothing more than ""used car salesmen." don't forget that no one joins the army to be a recruiter, we are all soldiers and all have other MOS's, I was formerly an 11B.

as a fellow gt member and someone with values that go beyond recruiting numbers, I'm here to help and answer any questions or concerns you might have.

deadday
10-02-2009, 21:30
guys, i spent 4 years in 3/75 and then volunteered for recruiting duty for a change of pace. i've been an army recruiter since mid 2005 and currently am in charge of a recruiting station in stafford, va. before everyone jumps down my throat, there are some bad apples out there but army recruiters for the most part are straight forward with their applicants, they HAVE to be. everything you are getting into, from your MOS to your length of service and enlistment bonus... its all included in a contract for you.

yes everyone has an 8 year MSO obligation whether you enlist for 2 years of active duty or 6, the remainder is spent in the IRR (idividual ready reserve). i don't know if anyone has been watching the news lately, but the economy isn't exactly doing great, which has opened a flood-gate of people trying to enlist into the military. currently every single branch is over strengthed so we are extremely restricted as to what qualifications applicants must meet for enlistment. many people are no longer receiving enlistment bonuses only because the Army doesn't need a whole lot of people, but again before you commit to anything you will know whether you are or not, as well as what job you will be doing.

if anyone has any specific question please feel free to pm me or post it on here if you are more comfortable keeping it public for others to "fact check", since all recruiters are nothing more than ""used car salesmen." don't forget that no one joins the army to be a recruiter, we are all soldiers and all have other MOS's, I was formerly an 11B.

as a fellow gt member and someone with values that go beyond recruiting numbers, I'm here to help and answer any questions or concerns you might have.


Welcome aboard :wavey:

ezterra
10-03-2009, 14:02
I enlisted at 32 years old. At the time I was married for 9 years and had 3 kids. My wife and I both understood that the entire family is joining the Army, not just me. It's something I've wanted to do for a long time, but for one reason or another never pulled the trigger. My wife finally got tired of me talking about joining and gave me an ultimatum. "Either join or quit talking about it." So I joined.

I've been in now for almost 3 years and have one deployment under my belt. For us, it has been the greatest experience ever. My family has met some wonderful people and we all have lifelong friends all over the country.

Throughout my initial training, basic and AIT, I have always been treated with quite a bit of respect. A lot more than your 18 y/o private. Prior to enlisting I was a chemist for a semi conductor company, and yes, I do have a BS in chemistry. I always get asked why I didn't go the officer route, and my answer is that I want to be on the ground doing the work.

The toughest part for me was going from a "professional" job where I was trusted and was not micromanaged to a job where I was constantly accountable to someone. Fortunately my direct supervisors and NCOs treated me with proper respect by giving me the benefit of the doubt. Once I made E5, things got much better.

At times it is tough to have supervisors 6-8 years younger. However, although I may have more "life experience" they had more military experience, and I respected them for that. When we deployed, my team leader already had 2 deployments under is belt in a combat arms MOS, so I really paid attention to what he had to offer. I guess you can say it's a lesson in humility.

I think the toughest people to deal with are the LTs. They are fresh out of college without any work or military experience. A lot of them have the "snobby attitude", and it really pisses me off.

Before I enlisted, I told my wife that if she was not 100% on board with being a military family, I will not do it. It turns out she has been more than 100% supportive. As a new Army family, and me as an E4, she volunteered to be our FRG leader. She went and took all the classes neccessary and did an awesome job while we were deployed. And to show how awesome she was, she managed the FRG and the helped the spouses in our unit despite homeschooling 3 kids and taking care of an 18 month old baby.

In my almost 3 years in the Army, we have been and seen many places in our great country. We've been to Redstone Arsenal in Alabama, Eglin AFB in Florida, and we drove across the country to my first duty station at Ft. Lewis. It's been a great experience and I would never discourage anyone, no matter how old, to enlist. Like everyone else said, just make sure you know what you're getting into, understand you contract, and make sure the entire family is committed.

Good luck.

dberry
10-19-2009, 17:08
Also, members of the military have a considerably higher divorce rate. I don't know what's more important to you, your family or joining the military?[/QUOTE]

I agree with you about thinking about your family and how important they are to you. Being in the military is a strain on the family but it wont lead to divorce as long as you and your family realize the sacrifices that you WILL have to make. If there is any doubt in you or your spouses mind DONT join. I have seen many men go into the military in order to live out their dream only to hurt or destroy their family life. Please dont rush this decision and approach it wisdomously.

Rocknropes
10-21-2009, 21:34
I enlisted at 32 years old. At the time I was married for 9 years and had 3 kids. My wife and I both understood that the entire family is joining the Army, not just me. It's something I've wanted to do for a long time, but for one reason or another never pulled the trigger. My wife finally got tired of me talking about joining and gave me an ultimatum. "Either join or quit talking about it." So I joined.

I've been in now for almost 3 years and have one deployment under my belt. For us, it has been the greatest experience ever. My family has met some wonderful people and we all have lifelong friends all over the country.

Throughout my initial training, basic and AIT, I have always been treated with quite a bit of respect. A lot more than your 18 y/o private. Prior to enlisting I was a chemist for a semi conductor company, and yes, I do have a BS in chemistry. I always get asked why I didn't go the officer route, and my answer is that I want to be on the ground doing the work.

The toughest part for me was going from a "professional" job where I was trusted and was not micromanaged to a job where I was constantly accountable to someone. Fortunately my direct supervisors and NCOs treated me with proper respect by giving me the benefit of the doubt. Once I made E5, things got much better.

At times it is tough to have supervisors 6-8 years younger. However, although I may have more "life experience" they had more military experience, and I respected them for that. When we deployed, my team leader already had 2 deployments under is belt in a combat arms MOS, so I really paid attention to what he had to offer. I guess you can say it's a lesson in humility.

I think the toughest people to deal with are the LTs. They are fresh out of college without any work or military experience. A lot of them have the "snobby attitude", and it really pisses me off.

Before I enlisted, I told my wife that if she was not 100% on board with being a military family, I will not do it. It turns out she has been more than 100% supportive. As a new Army family, and me as an E4, she volunteered to be our FRG leader. She went and took all the classes neccessary and did an awesome job while we were deployed. And to show how awesome she was, she managed the FRG and the helped the spouses in our unit despite homeschooling 3 kids and taking care of an 18 month old baby.

In my almost 3 years in the Army, we have been and seen many places in our great country. We've been to Redstone Arsenal in Alabama, Eglin AFB in Florida, and we drove across the country to my first duty station at Ft. Lewis. It's been a great experience and I would never discourage anyone, no matter how old, to enlist. Like everyone else said, just make sure you know what you're getting into, understand you contract, and make sure the entire family is committed.

Good luck.

:goodpost:

Shimmy & Shake
10-23-2009, 22:33
Examples of things to 'get in writing':

-any rank above E1 they offer
-choice of duty station
-HRAP
-any advanced schools offered (Airborne, Air Assault, RIP, LVN, etc depending on your MOS)
-YOUR BONUS

...asking for paperwork is not saying 'I don't trust you', it's saying 'I know how things work in the real world'....if it is not written down, it doesn't happen, didn't exist, was never said....

This is well said as far as what you need to get in writing.

Halal Pork
10-23-2009, 22:47
This guy is not around anymore I think, the guy who started the thread. My advice is different from a lot of folks. For an older guy, I'd say chase a security clearance. For a younger guy, I'd say go combat arms and plan to reclass down the road. And then chase the clearance. Combat arms is the best way to come up. I guess I am biased. Then again I have the ankles and knees of an elderly man. Eh, it was worth it.

Shimmy & Shake
10-23-2009, 22:54
This guy is not around anymore I think, the guy who started the thread. My advice is different from a lot of folks. For an older guy, I'd say chase a security clearance. For a younger guy, I'd say go combat arms and plan to reclass down the road. And then chase the clearance. Combat arms is the best way to come up. I guess I am biased. Then again I have the ankles and knees of an elderly man. Eh, it was worth it.

Thanks for the information, you saved me from a lot of typing. I hope it works out for him either way...

Cheers HP...

oneofthose
11-06-2009, 16:26
Thank you, ezterra, for sharing your experience above, and thanks everyone for all your replies and input.

I've enlisted and headed for basic in December.

5 OH GLOCK
11-06-2009, 16:50
Thank you, ezterra, for sharing your experience above, and thanks everyone for all your replies and input.

I've enlisted and headed for basic in December.


Ok i guess you want us to ask so here it goes..

What? Where? Why? and How long??:whistling:

JBarbaresi
11-06-2009, 18:11
Thank you, ezterra, for sharing your experience above, and thanks everyone for all your replies and input.

I've enlisted and headed for basic in December.

OCS? typically we don't ship anyone in december because of christmas exodus... or are you scheduled to ship 30 december?

luv2brode
11-08-2009, 12:05
i was 26 when i went in nothing to bad.
just remember this job is focused on a person starting at younger ages. plus side you pt test will be easier to excel, i messed up there mine where the highest.
i went infantry so that makes a little difference too

robin303
11-08-2009, 23:51
Thank you, ezterra, for sharing your experience above, and thanks everyone for all your replies and input.

I've enlisted and headed for basic in December.

My only advice is to start jogging up to 3 or more miles per day and start doing push ups. In my time it was close to 200+ per day in basic.
What is your MOS going to be.
Good luck.
PS If you have any questions we will all help you out. :supergrin:

Bren
11-09-2009, 02:55
I might have missed it it but a lot of the cut offs in the Army is 32. So what age did the Recruitor say. I might be wrong since I have been out for about 10 years. What MOS do you want. The only thing I know is the only way to move up fast in rank is 11B. [Infantry] If I could do it all over again it would be Coast Guard.

The current maximum enlistment age is 40, I believe. They raised it about 3 years ago.

Bren
11-09-2009, 02:58
My only advice is to start jogging up to 3 or more miles per day and start doing push ups. In my time it was close to 200+ per day in basic.
What is your MOS going to be.
Good luck.
PS If you have any questions we will all help you out. :supergrin:

When you get there, it would be nice if you could run a mile in a decent time and do 30-40 pushups and situps, but if you can't they will build you up. I've seen privates some in who couldn't do 1 good pushup - they learned. There is no need to panic about that stuff at this point - the more you can do the easier it will be, but you aren't going home because you can't do a 3 mile run and 200 pushups.

JBarbaresi
11-09-2009, 09:38
The current maximum enlistment age is 40, I believe. They raised it about 3 years ago.

need to be in training by your 42nd birthday.

bigdaddyjav
11-11-2009, 11:20
Thank you, ezterra, for sharing your experience above, and thanks everyone for all your replies and input.

I've enlisted and headed for basic in December.

Good luck and stay awake! Get a head start on your push-ups and running! If you plan on jump school, start doing pull-ups! Huuuuaaaah!

Currahee
11-11-2009, 11:44
I salute you for enlisting - I found that to be the hardest part of the whole experience (leaving all the comfort and knowns for the unknown).

In terms of getting ready for basic - you want to run but don't run too much (3 times a week is fine). You don't want to show up injured. Make sure you spend the extra money to get great running shows, it will really help your joints. I think Asics are the best. The best way to do well on the PT test is to practice the actual events (pushups, situps, running).

All the best... for someone who is a bit older you just got to hang in there until you become an NCO, then life is a lot more bearable.

GroovedG19
11-13-2009, 16:27
Welcome to the brotherhood.It is the path of the righteous.Congrats.

oneofthose
03-08-2013, 13:22
I started this thread 3 1/2 years ago and ran across it today when I was looking for another old thread in the reloading forum. Got me thinking about how much life has changed since then. I have been blessed so far with a very successful and rewarding military career, largely because of the love and support of my family. We made this commitment together, and we all serve.

Being an older married couple gave us an opportunity to mentor others. I am so proud of my wife, and all she has done. A week never goes by that she doesn’t help another family out by delivering a meal, watching kids, helping with functions on post, or just listening to a fellow Army Wife about a problem. She is the best, and I am the luckiest man alive. WE recently signed up for another 6 years, and hope to stay for as long as we can.

Thought I'd share some of what I've learned, coming into the Army at my age:

1. The military is not a good place to grow up. You need to be grown up when you get here. I believe there was a time when the military could help a kid that had some growing up to do, but not now.

2. Mole skin and Ibuprofen are my friends.

3. It’s cheaper to drive than run. I pay $100 for running shoes that must be replaced every 500 miles. I can drive further than 500 miles on $100 worth of gas.

4. Hunger is the best seasoning. If you’re hungry enough, you can eat almost anything. And sometimes hunger is a blessing. It gives you the will to take another bite of something you don’t like, because you know you must.

5. Your wife can say things to your Company Commander that you can’t.

6. If you want to see what government health care has in store for you, ask an Army Wife who has had to deal with tricare.

I’m sure I could think of a few more. Feel free to add some of your own…………