Magnum LP vs LP on .45 Recipe [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Beware Owner
10-26-2009, 10:28
I have some 230gr LRN from twoalpha I'm about to load up with 6.5gr of Silhouette. I could only find some Magnum LP primers at the store yesterday, should I back up the grain by .1 and just have at it, or what?

Beware Owner
10-27-2009, 07:33
As the crickets chirp in the background...

fredj338
10-27-2009, 08:47
I would , just to be safe. I have run chrono test w/ the 45acp & diff. powders & primers. Some show pressure increases, some not. I have not used silh, but Unique shows some pressure/vel increase while WST does not. Backing off 0.1-0.2gr would be prudent.

Beware Owner
10-27-2009, 09:13
I just hope it doesn't affect my accuracy much, since I don't have a chrono.

fredj338
10-27-2009, 12:38
I just hope it doesn't affect my accuracy much, since I don't have a chrono.
I haven't noticed, but I pretty much limit my pistol shooting to 25yds max except for hunting loads in the magnums.

stengun
10-27-2009, 20:48
Howdy,

Like Fred said, back off the powder a little, maybe as much as a 1/2gr and go from there.

When it comes to primers, I'm not picky, I'll buy/use what ever is available.

Paul

Beware Owner
10-28-2009, 07:06
I haven't noticed, but I pretty much limit my pistol shooting to 25yds max except for hunting loads in the magnums.

I'll probably go as far as 50ft, and I'm not looking for sphincter tight groups at that distance for practice.

Howdy,

Like Fred said, back off the powder a little, maybe as much as a 1/2gr and go from there.

When it comes to primers, I'm not picky, I'll buy/use what ever is available.

Paul

I don't have a problem using any primer I get my hands on, but I'm still a virgin to MLPs. I have no idea how Silhouette will react with the difference.

Maninmirror
10-29-2009, 09:07
I know everyone can't afford a Chronograph. I'll just say that since purchasing one I have loaded rounds that with-out it I would have assumed I didn't have much pressure increase and I did and Visa Versa.

Owning a chronograph has not only eliminated doubt, but it has also helped me come up with some really nice loads and not spending all day doing it.

I decided to get one for the simple reason that I like the rest of you have many different primer brands as well as powders I never used. It's essential to have a load book. But it doesn't get you where you need to be if your using different brand components.

Using someone else s load data is dangerous. I have tried a few loads from the forum. Most of them were fine from a pressure stand-point. But of 5 examples I tried only one was anywhere close to producing the same results as it produced for the other person. That's not worth blowing up my hand or my face or my gun.

That could be because of my brass, maybe my crimp touch, my bullets or any small amount of other minor variables that don't match exactly.

I.m not Richy Rich. I didn't just run out and buy a chronograph.

After reading the advise from the guys in here using chronographs I decided that I'd sacrifice a couple thousand rounds of bullets and use the money for a Chronograph.

Best decision I could have made. Really guys. As far as I am concerned reloading without a chrono is like riding a motorcycle without a helmet. Laws of average get us all. Don't kid yourself.

For those of you that don't agree. I am only making these statements because we haven't had the luxury of buying the components the Reload Manual said to use. That, and 2 month's ago a guy came into the gunshop with a Kimber that was blown up. He said he'd used exactly the same load data the guy from the forum used and it was fine at first.

Obviously he didn't know what high pressure looked like. He was fairly new to reloading and said he had used the same components-but who knows. From some of the research I have done, there are those that feel different dyes can produce different results.

Granted, most of us probably will dodge the bullet. And that's exactly my point. Thanks

Beware Owner
10-29-2009, 09:13
Well, I do want a chrono. I am fully aware of how this tool works and helps getting you where you need to be. Actually, I can't wait till I get one.

Beware Owner
12-30-2009, 11:34
This sunday I tested some of the .45 with MLP, and Silhouette with 6.3gr had a pretty harsh kick to it.

Gunnut 45/454
12-30-2009, 13:42
Beware Owner
Start at the STARTING load with that powder and work up - use or get a chrony! You most likely end up a grain or more short of max! The 45 ACP is more forgiving then the small calibers- I would never use mag primer in 9mm,380 etc. as they are cases stuffed full of powder with most loads!:supergrin:

ron59
12-30-2009, 14:40
Only $92 right now (on sale).
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=852429

It's the one I have, and I feel it's pretty accurate. When I chrono'ed my last set of my reloads, I also shot some WWB 115grain bullets over it, so I could compare them against what I see others get. Dead on.

I was watching a gun show just the other day (Guns and Gear? Guns and Ammo?). Whichever, the were shooting a rifle cartridge (believe it was 30.06) over one of these. This is a TV show who chose to use this.

For this amount of money... it's GREAT to have. I found out my accuracy problems was due to too LITTLE powder in my 9mm 147gr reloads.

Without a doubt, a MUST have investment.

jaybirdjtt
12-30-2009, 17:08
I saw a chronograph on sale yesterday, shaped like a bullet, but claiming decent accuracy for $119.98....on sale. RCBS self contained model.
The store is right next to RCBS in Oroville, CA. I don't know anything about it except that it looked easy to use. I may have to check into the Midway deal!
http://www.huntingtonsports.com/index.html

dougader
12-30-2009, 23:40
The brand of magnum LP primers makes a difference, too. IME CCI 350's run hotter than Federal mag primers or Winchester LPM primers.

Always back off and start your load workup again when you switch any component. I don't think Silhouette is a particularly "spiky" powder, especially in a low pressure round like 45 auto but it never hurts to be cautious.

The chrony is a good bit of advice. A person's subjective perception of recoil is a very poor way of judging high/overpressure loads. The one mistake I made as a newbie that hurt a 30-06 rifle actually felt like a low pressure round. It wasn't until I tried to work the bolt that I saw the blown case. Talk about sticky case extraction!

Beware Owner
01-02-2010, 11:38
Believe me, I know I need a chrono. And, yes, the difference in felt recoil was noticeable, enough for me not to continue testing it. I'll have to start the test all over.

Snapper2
01-02-2010, 15:02
Believe me, I know I need a chrono. And, yes, the difference in felt recoil was noticeable, enough for me not to continue testing it. I'll have to start the test all over.

What did the primers look like on the fired brass? When using fed 150s(standard) on high end loads, they seem to start flattening out. On cci 350s it seems they start do the opposite(rounding?) and showing light primer strike in 45acp.

njl
01-03-2010, 09:49
This one's on sale and in stock right now.
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=244882

Compared to the cost of other reloading gear and components, I've never understood why anyone would reload without one.

Their web site appears to be down right now, but I think Shooting Chrony used to sell a very basic model (possibly refurb) for around $50.

Gunnut 45/454
01-03-2010, 10:57
Beware Owner
So you loaded up some rounds with Mag primer but didn't reduce the charge wt? Not smart! Start at the starting load!!!:faint:

Beware Owner
01-04-2010, 10:56
The primers didn't seem flattened out, and I did reduce the charge, but not all the way down to the starting point.

mteagle1
01-04-2010, 12:23
Chronographs are great for discovering velocities and will tell you if that velocity is above that recommended by the powder manfacturer for EXACTLY the same combination but has no direct relationship to pressure. A load may be perfectly safe in one gun and blow up another. A chronograph will not tell you accuracy that is what holes in paper do. A chronograph will benifit a competive shooter that needs to obtain a certain velocity but not really help the shooter that needs a 1/2 MOA on target.

Beware Owner, you didn't indicate how the previous load felt so why did dropping the charge with a magnum primer make it feel harsh. Silhoutte is a pretty slow powder for a 230gr lead bullet. I like 3.8 Clays or 4.4 American Select or Solo 1000 for a soft feel but these are with a Federal LP primer. YMMV

Beware Owner
01-04-2010, 13:37
The first load was pretty mild, just enough to get the slide racking.

Downzero
01-05-2010, 11:18
You're not going to see flat primers in .45 loads anyway, the pressure limit is 1/3 to 1/2 of what is necessary to flatten primers.

Also, IIRC, Winchester doesn't make a "LPM" primer (someone else mentioned that here). Winchester LP primers are approved for regular and magnum loads.

Personally, I don't think primers make a difference at all. They never have in anything I've tested, from 9mm to 30-06 rifle. YMMV.

Beware Owner
01-05-2010, 15:04
You're not going to see flat primers in .45 loads anyway, the pressure limit is 1/3 to 1/2 of what is necessary to flatten primers.

Also, IIRC, Winchester doesn't make a "LPM" primer (someone else mentioned that here). Winchester LP primers are approved for regular and magnum loads.

Personally, I don't think primers make a difference at all. They never have in anything I've tested, from 9mm to 30-06 rifle. YMMV.

You've ran these tests with a chronograph?