What Everyone Should KNOW about DryFiring Their Pistol >> [Archive] - Glock Talk

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TheLastDaze
11-14-2009, 07:33
OK, First of all I'm either man enough or stupid enough to share my ignorance with glocktalk public.

650 rounds later I'm still not at 100% with DA (glock)triggers, so I've posted in the past. EVERYONE recommends DRYFIRE, DRYFIRE etc.... So I buy a couple snap caps, but man what a pain to do, so I've never done it, UNTIL NOW..

Some of you noobies and old-timers may already know you DO NOT have to eject your snap cap AT ALL...

That's right I'm an idiot and never thought to even try to (reset) the striker without ejecting round (as I've never had to practice dryfire in my life), simply have a snap cap in and fire, then move slide back approximately 1/4" and you're ready again..

I'm sure EVERYONE KNOWS this, just thought I'd share for the possibility SOMEONE may not...

glockfanbob
11-14-2009, 07:35
Some of you noobies and old-timers may already know you DO NOT have to eject your snap cap AT ALL...

Yep, I can't imagine dry firing with ejecting a snap cap all the time.

Kentucky_Guy
11-14-2009, 07:52
for me, personally, i dont see the need to repeatedly dry-fire a glock...since its the exact same trigger pull ever time....

but now on my Sig 229 when i had it, i dry fired the heck out of it with a snap cap to smooth out the trigger and get accustomed to the double action pull....

again, nothing wrong with dry firing a glock, just dont see the need for it

Butcher777
11-14-2009, 08:05
Thanks for the tip ,I've been around guns and shooting for over 35 years . Owning a Glock is new to me and I want any and all the information I can get . Thanks Mike

Slotback
11-14-2009, 08:09
Passing on lessons learned never hurts. No matter when it is learned.

MrVvrroomm
11-14-2009, 08:15
Some of you noobies and old-timers may already know you DO NOT have to eject your snap cap AT ALL...

That's right I'm an idiot and never thought to even try to (reset) the striker without ejecting round (as I've never had to practice dryfire in my life), simply have a snap cap in and fire, then move slide back approximately 1/4" and you're ready again..

I'm sure EVERYONE KNOWS this, just thought I'd share for the possibility SOMEONE may not...Even my wife is sitting here giggling after I read your post to her. LOL

faawrenchbndr
11-14-2009, 08:23
for me, personally, i dont see the need to repeatedly dry-fire a glock...since its the exact same trigger pull ever time....


Muscle memory,..... you are trining your ming, grip, stance and trigger finger.
It's a lot cheaper than bullets.

Palmguy
11-14-2009, 08:28
for me, personally, i dont see the need to repeatedly dry-fire a glock...since its the exact same trigger pull ever time....

but now on my Sig 229 when i had it, i dry fired the heck out of it with a snap cap to smooth out the trigger and get accustomed to the double action pull....

again, nothing wrong with dry firing a glock, just dont see the need for it

I agree with faawrenchbndr...dryfire is important for practice. It's been the single most important practice technique in improving my shooting.

glockman513
11-14-2009, 09:09
A lot of repetitive dry firing will have the same affect as a .25 cent trigger job. But I mean A LOT of dry firing.

jmsfmtex
11-14-2009, 09:09
Using snap caps is beneficial in areas other than resetting the trigger. They are useful when doing drills on malfunctions. As one member mentioned "muscle memory". When you have a FTF you slap the magazine and rack the slide. This way you will most likely slap and rack rather than just reset the trigger. What you do during drills you will most likely do doing a real life situation.

TheLastDaze
11-14-2009, 09:34
Even my wife is sitting here giggling after I read your post to her. LOL

thanks, I feel so much better now.....:tongueout:

toshbar
11-14-2009, 09:54
Just going to put this out for the OP:

You also can hold the trigger back after dry firing, rack the slide, and then practice on your trigger reset and getting off another dry fire.

hatrix
11-14-2009, 10:08
I'm gonna go ahead and admit that I didn't know this lol.

I've only dry fired the snap caps a couple times with my glock but damn, I feel stupid for not thinking of this :crying::rofl::rofl:
I just assumed most people used em for revolvers and dry fired without anything in autos

Pappy John
11-14-2009, 10:18
Muscle memory,..... you are trining your ming
I am????

Holy Cow! I'm not sure that's even legal in my state.:supergrin:

Brucev
11-14-2009, 11:21
It has been a long time since I've owned a Glock. Recently I bought a G-22RTF. I very much like the pistol. But it's far different that a 1911 trigger. I've been dry firing the pistol at night to develop control, etc. I understood that one did not need to use snap caps to dry fire a Glock. Is this information incorrect? Sincerely. Brucev.

Mr5150
11-14-2009, 11:30
I am????

Holy Cow! I'm not sure that's even legal in my state.:supergrin:

That KILLED me! :rofl:

JBaird22
11-14-2009, 15:53
As far as needing to use snap caps to prevent damage in a Glock, they are not needed. The design of the gun and parts doesn't make the weapon susceptible to damage from dry firing. I think the OP was talking about using them in place of live ammo or an empty chamber.

I treat dry fire practice like malfunction drill practice in that I pulled the trigger, gun went click, I tap, rack reassess.

Dry firing is necessary in all firearms to building trigger finger strength, muscle memory and develop proper trigger control.

.45Super-Man
11-14-2009, 18:23
for me, personally, i dont see the need to repeatedly dry-fire a glock...since its the exact same trigger pull ever time....

but now on my Sig 229 when i had it, i dry fired the heck out of it with a snap cap to smooth out the trigger and get accustomed to the double action pull....

again, nothing wrong with dry firing a glock, just dont see the need for it
The point of dry firing isnt so much to smooth out the trigger, as it is to focus on sight alignment as you pull the trigger. Once you've released the striker or hammer without disturbing the sight picture, you're good.

Gallium
11-14-2009, 20:32
Muscle memory,..... you are training your mind, grip, stance and trigger finger.
It's a lot cheaper than bullets.

"Muscles" don't have "memory". :) What I assume you mean is, you are allowing those neural pathways in your brain to become familiar with the task so that it can become a subconscious action (like walking, breathing, etc).


As far as needing to use snap caps to prevent damage in a Glock, they are not needed. The design of the gun and parts doesn't make the weapon susceptible to damage from dry firing. I think the OP was talking about using them in place of live ammo or an empty chamber.

I treat dry fire practice like malfunction drill practice in that I pulled the trigger, gun went click, I tap, rack reassess.

Dry firing is necessary in all firearms to building trigger finger strength, muscle memory and develop proper trigger control.


There is a GTer here (JAMROCK), who if memory serves me proper, damaged his Glock from dry firing. Not saying this is the case, just saying that's what HE said.

'Drew

THEPOPE
11-14-2009, 21:40
As I am sure you all know, dry-firing a Glock is the way to field strip it, and as such, it is designed for "dry-fire"....

Now, if you hold that trigger back, and move the slide a bit ( 1/4 inch, or less...)

you can now let loose the trigger slowly to experience the "re-set" feature of that trigger...and dry-fire again.

Maybe some other pistols can do this, too, I only know it's a fact about Glocks.

"........woe...black Betty...bam-a-lam.........."........I am noww:cool:out

JBaird22
11-16-2009, 08:28
Drew, as this being the internet, people say all sorts of things. Whether they are correct or not remains to be seen. I just know what the master armorer told me when I was certified. Dry firing should not damage a Glock. That being said, every gun that leaves the factory is now in a different state of repair and maintenance so someone that uses aftermarket parts, does a .25 cent trigger job or whatever might experience damage when dry firing. Doesn't make it dry firing's fault.

zoyter2
11-17-2009, 00:40
for me, personally, i dont see the need to repeatedly dry-fire a glock...since its the exact same trigger pull ever time....

but now on my Sig 229 when i had it, i dry fired the heck out of it with a snap cap to smooth out the trigger and get accustomed to the double action pull....

again, nothing wrong with dry firing a glock, just dont see the need for it

If you dry fire for "just the trigger pull", you are not properly dry firing. Dry firing is the very best way to improve your accuracy and proficiency with a weapon. The benefits exceed live fire by a long shot.

Foxfire5
11-17-2009, 00:43
Even my wife is sitting here giggling after I read your post to her. LOL

No offence but that is funny. :rofl::rofl:

Black Cloud
11-17-2009, 00:54
Using snap caps is beneficial in areas other than resetting the trigger. They are useful when doing drills on malfunctions. As one member mentioned "muscle memory". When you have a FTF you slap the magazine and rack the slide. This way you will most likely slap and rack rather than just reset the trigger. What you do during drills you will most likely do doing a real life situation.

Exactly when you are dry firing, use that time also for properly manipulating the slide. You want it to become second nature. If you are going to do it, do it right.

Also practice reloading and getting the pistol ready from different conditions.

Gallium
11-17-2009, 04:19
Drew, as this being the internet, people say all sorts of things. Whether they are correct or not remains to be seen. I just know what the master armorer told me when I was certified. Dry firing should not damage a Glock. That being said, every gun that leaves the factory is now in a different state of repair and maintenance so someone that uses aftermarket parts, does a .25 cent trigger job or whatever might experience damage when dry firing. Doesn't make it dry firing's fault.


Understood. In this instance, I know of Jamrock, who he is, and what he does. I don't have the search-fu to find his thread.

OK. Maybe I WILL go search for it... :cool:

TheLastDaze
11-18-2009, 20:40
Understood. In this instance, I know of Jamrock, who he is, and what he does. I don't have the search-fu to find his thread.

OK. Maybe I WILL go search for it... :cool:

Did ya find it?

Gallium
11-19-2009, 02:59
Did ya find it?

Here is where he 1st speaks of it (last year)
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=943918&highlight=dry+firing


and here is where he created his own thread on his experience.... (this year).


http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1080661&highlight=dry+firing

For all those folks who continue to think its impossible to break your gun, I had uploaded a pic some long time ago of my G17C breech face which had suffered catastrophic failure due to (really) excessive dry firing. This happened back in '03.

Here it is again:

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b217/saneil/BrokenGlock.jpg

So last night I was rummaging around in my vault and found this:
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b217/saneil/CutSlide.jpg

The story is that I had to Fedex the piece of the slide block to the Glock Dealer in Uruguay (No dealer here on the Rock)...and Fedex wouldn't take the whole slide - That's a "firearm or part thereof"...so I had to cut it and send it as Scrap Metal. Took me three months for all the Import / Export paper work and ex-transit/in-transit time, but Glock's Customer Service was great. They sent me a completely new slide - with original serial number - at no cost.

But three months without my CCw was not fun. Moral of the story; use snap caps to do dry fire practice.

dugo
11-19-2009, 08:26
(Thanks for all this, Drew. Educational for me.)

Gallium
11-19-2009, 08:54
(Thanks for all this, Drew. Educational for me.)

Hi,

:)

Remember, I know of Jamrock - we are both from Jamaica, but I am not attesting as fact that his pistol did indeed break from dry-firing. I have only reposted what he did.

I am inclined to believe something happened...if the frigging space shuttle :wow::wow:can blow up, any other man made mechanical device can!

teweekley
12-07-2009, 08:51
I recently placed a call to Glock Customer Support to ask a few questions. One of them was about using snap caps for dry firing. The technician said occasional dry firing to take the tension off the firing pin or to perform a field strip is okay, but recommended the use of snap caps if I was going to do dry fire sessions for practice. The other information I obtained, although not related to this thread, was they use Break-Free CLP to clean the entire gun. They use GunScrubber for tougher jobs but avoid using ANY ammonia-based cleaners.

golls17
12-07-2009, 11:55
It must be lunch time.

I just read the title as "What everyone should know about deep frying their pistol"...

TheLastDaze
12-07-2009, 18:57
It must be lunch time.

I just read the title as "What everyone should know about deep frying their pistol"...

so did ya get something to eat? preferably 'deep fried'....

Mushinto
01-08-2010, 10:57
... They sent me a completely new slide - with original serial number - at no cost. ...

I am not doubting most of his story, but I do not believe this part at all.

I have never known Glock to replace a slide, frame or barrel with an original SN.

Given the number of spare parts they have, why would they make a brand new part just to stamp an original SN? Just to make it sound good on an Internet forum?

ML

zoyter2
01-08-2010, 15:03
I am not doubting most of his story, but I do not believe this part at all.

I have never known Glock to replace a slide, frame or barrel with an original SN.

Given the number of spare parts they have, why would they make a brand new part just to stamp an original SN? Just to make it sound good on an Internet forum?

ML

Could be because he was required to cut the original in half in order to ship the broken part to GLOCK? :dunno: