Inspection tips for buying used Glock [Archive] - Glock Talk

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beforeobamabans
12-08-2009, 17:02
In the near future, I will be looking at my first potential purchase of a used Glock (I've always bought new) and I'm curious as to what you would specifically look for when inspecting used Glocks (or any gun for that matter) prior to purchase. I will probably not have a chance to shoot this gun before making my decision. My checklist currently includes:

1. Visual inspection of exterior for damage, scars, wear.
2. Dry fire for function.
3. Load mags for function.
4. Cycle loaded mag through gun by racking slide.
5. Field strip
6. Inspect internals for cleanliness, wear.
7. Check documentation of test fire date, S/N, matching numbers
8. Check for aftermarket internals.

Your suggestions to add to this list will be appreciated.

SCC
12-08-2009, 17:57
Make sure all the numbers match ...

Maine1
12-08-2009, 18:00
check for aftermarket internals, such as firing pin and connector.

Most used glocks will be a little dirty. the only time i have been bitten is with aftermarked parts..but the gun DID shoot fine for about 8k rounds before becoming a problem.

beforeobamabans
12-08-2009, 18:55
Thanks. The gun I'm going to be looking at is an early gen G30 (no rail). The seller also bought this gun used, claims to have only put 50 rds thru and hasn't been able to provide any prior history. He does have the original case and mags. I have a Jan '09 G30SF, so I feel pretty comfortable working the gun and taking it apart. I am very curious to get a look at the trigger bar after all the furor over scratched bars and related slide interference problems on recent vintage G30SFs. The seller is asking $350 which I view as fair. It will be an interesting exercise for me and hopefully that reknown Glock reliability will carry me through anything I overlook.

SCC and Maine: OP updated to include your suggestions. Thanks.

SCC
12-08-2009, 19:18
Find a gssf near you and they will go over it and replace any parts that need to be replaced for you for free ....

MarkCO
12-08-2009, 19:27
As long as the frame, barrel and slide are not cracked or otherwise damaged, you will be fine. I know a guy who went to a GSSF match with a Glock he got taken on used that had no trigger guts or housing, just a paperclip holding the trigger in place. Armorer put ALL new parts in and sent him off to shoot the match.

Look for hogged out pin holes in the frame. I press them out and put them back to make sure everything is correct. Dirty does not matter much to me, means they are not trying to cover somehting up (usually) and shot it. Run your pinched fingers down the barrel feeling for bulges, and then look for any rings or pitting IN the barrel. Make sure the extractor is not broken (if it is, bargain the price down and still get it). I don't care a bit about hand cycling rounds, gives no indication of proper function, so shoot it if you can meet seller at the range.

ENDOtactical
12-08-2009, 19:28
In before the explosion jokes :P

In all seriousness though that list you compiled is good, except #4 might make some gun store workers nervous, or might not even be allowed for liability reasons

OVERTHEHILLGUY
12-08-2009, 23:16
Check the breach face. If it has a inward dimple around the firing pin hole, this will indicate the pistol has been shot alot, maybe with hot hand loads.


OVERTHEHILLGUY

voyager4520
12-09-2009, 06:42
As long as the frame, barrel and slide are not cracked or otherwise damaged, you will be fine. I know a guy who went to a GSSF match with a Glock he got taken on used that had no trigger guts or housing, just a paperclip holding the trigger in place. Armorer put ALL new parts in and sent him off to shoot the match.

Look for hogged out pin holes in the frame. I press them out and put them back to make sure everything is correct. Dirty does not matter much to me, means they are not trying to cover somehting up (usually) and shot it. Run your pinched fingers down the barrel feeling for bulges, and then look for any rings or pitting IN the barrel. Make sure the extractor is not broken (if it is, bargain the price down and still get it). I don't care a bit about hand cycling rounds, gives no indication of proper function, so shoot it if you can meet seller at the range.

My philosophy. Make sure the gun isn't stolen or anything, matching serial numbers, and as long as the slide, barrel, and frame are in good condition I'll buy it, but not for more than $400 because if I have to replace internals anything over $400 I might've been better off buying a new one. The pin holes in the frame is a good suggestion, some people detail strip so often that these holes get too enlarged.

k80clay
12-09-2009, 06:57
Yea, I don't know about #4. Personally, I wouldn't let a prospective buyer load a pistol (ever see Terminator?).

I dry fire the pistol, and with the trigger held back, push on the top of the chamber. If there is a lot of movement, it's pretty worn. If there is just a little, less so, but keep in mind, even the new guns will have a little play when you do this.

It's usually not hard to see if a pistol has been taken car of or not.

JustShoot-IT
12-20-2009, 12:10
Excellent idea for a thread. Interestingly Ive never bought a new firearm and I have some.
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Although Id probably do it if the seller allowed, I think that #4 could be an issue. I have a Sig 226 40S&W that hangs up when chambering while cycling by hand (even after polishing the feed ramp, etc.) BUT it has no issues cycling when firing or chambering via the slide release.
<o:p> </o:p>
Markasaurus: in my part of CA it is rare to walk into a gunshop and not see a used Glock. In a State near me they discount them to sell them but they cannot keep revolvers on the shelves! Go figure?:dunno:<o:p></o:p>

AZDUDE95
02-17-2010, 23:19
Shoot under water.:rofl:J/K!
Your list looks good. I like to Check recoil spring by aiming gun verticle (unloaded ofcourse) no magazine, pull slide back and slowly let forward to see how slide goes into full battery. Doing this with a new gun will give a good point of ref. May have to upgrade to a new style trigger bar being a 4256-1 vs. old style 4256.

bmwmpb
03-27-2011, 08:18
Great thread. Thanks for all of info. I would feel pretty comfortable purchasing a used gun. Utilizing all of the posts, here's the current check sheet:


1. Visual inspection of exterior for damage, scars, wear.
2. Look for hogged out pin holes in the frame. Press them out and put them back to make sure everything is correct.
3. Check the breach face. If it has a inward dimple around the firing pin hole, this will indicate the pistol has been shot alot, maybe with hot hand loads.
4. Check recoil spring by aiming gun verticle (unloaded), no magazine, pull slide back and slowly let forward to see how slide goes into full battery.
5. Load mags for function.
6. Cycle loaded mag through gun by racking slide.
7. Dry fire for function. With the trigger held back, push on the top of the chamber. If there is a lot of movement, it's pretty worn. If there is just a little, less so, but keep in mind, even the new guns will have a little play when you do this.
8. Field strip
9. Inspect internals for cleanliness, wear.
10. Check for aftermarket internals.
11. Run your pinched fingers down the barrel feeling for bulges.
12. Look for any rings or pitting IN the barrel.
13. Make sure the extractor is not broken
14.Check documentation of test fire date, S/N, matching numbers

Bill Lumberg
03-28-2011, 09:10
With privately owned guns, I worry about amateur gunsmithing or aftermarket parts. With LE guns, I don't worry- moderately high round count and immaculate functionally.

Poopbear1
04-18-2011, 03:35
With privately owned guns, I worry about amateur gunsmithing or aftermarket parts. With LE guns, I don't worry- moderately high round count and immaculate functionally.

So true....

Most LE guns may look worn to all hell, but a lot of that is just holster wear, and exposure. They undergo routine maintenance for the most part, and fired somewhat regularly to ensure functionality (and officer ability) and are usually very well taken care of.

What a difference knowing that your weapon most likely will be your lifeline in an oh S$%& situation sure does make you want to take much better care of it.

I admit, some of my weapons do not receive near the maintenance or care that my go to weapons do, but all get cleaned/checked after use.

rodfatherjr
05-29-2011, 13:37
All these guys know more than I about Glocks! But, I would add the cliche: "more important than the deal is the GUY in the deal" !!

MKEgal
09-23-2011, 02:30
re: cycling through a magazine by hand
Use snap caps

ken grant
10-16-2011, 11:43
Glock replaced the frame on my 23 and now numbers don't match.
Just how much did this lower the value?

G30SF46
11-27-2011, 12:31
Is there a reason why you wouldn't be able to fire it?


Glock 30

Big Time
11-27-2011, 12:41
Or send it to GLOCK and they will check it out and replace what is needed.

shadow_dog
11-27-2011, 16:18
One thing I learned the hard way was to check the barrel for bulges. I got a good deal on a Gen1 G17. I gave it a quick look over and bought it. Took it to the Marietta Oh GSSF match to get updated. The armorer found it had a bulged barrel. Now I know to field strip the pistol and drop the barrel back thru the muzzle end of the slide to check for bulges. Mine in particular was bulged right past the chamber, it didn't show on a normal cycle of the slide. Glock offered to replace the barrel, but I would have to send in the bulged barrel. In the end I bought a used Glock barrel and kept the original barrel.

JK-linux
11-27-2011, 16:53
Check the serial number list here on GT if you are looking to avoid a perceived issue such as late model gen 3's.

glockman4lif
01-10-2012, 15:29
1)CHECK ID
Pretty much what everyone stated.

USDefender
01-21-2012, 16:53
4. Check recoil spring by... pull[ing] the slide back and slowly let forward to see how slide goes into full battery.


When I bought my used Glock, I did this. I also did it quickly. Each time, the gun functioned just fine, including locking back on an empty magazine as it's supposed to. What I didn't realize, however, (because I wasn't familiar with how all the 'parts & pieces' should look) was that the end of the 'captured recoil spring/guide rod assy' was missing so that the spring was no longer 'captured.' While it didn't effect the gun's functioning, it was nevertheless broken... Only a quick field strip would have shown me that.

If I had known, I would have still bought the gun but I would have had a great bargaining chip with which to drive the great price I paid even lower...

I guess the saying is true-- "Knowledge is power."

LDNN
03-14-2012, 21:15
It's a Glock, not a Hi-Point. There is no bad Glock, some are better than others.

Tacoma12
04-05-2012, 22:50
The G21 I just bought from Bud's Police Supply has the "1" stamped before the serial number on the slide. Did some research and apparently its a frame recall from 01-02. Glock says its fine and don't worry, but I'd keep an eye out for that. I don't know if it affects the overall vale though, its a police trade in.

roadkill46
04-06-2012, 08:10
hi points have a lifetime, no questions asked warranty and it does not matter if you are the first or the 1000 owner. jus sayin! (995's are fun guns!)

Veedubklown
04-06-2012, 17:15
Shoot under water.:rofl:J/K!
Your list looks good. I like to Check recoil spring by aiming gun verticle (unloaded ofcourse) no magazine, pull slide back and slowly let forward to see how slide goes into full battery. Doing this with a new gun will give a good point of ref. May have to upgrade to a new style trigger bar being a 4256-1 vs. old style 4256.

+1 to adding this to the list. From what I understand, this is the glock armorer's method to checking recoil spring wear.

Ryobi
04-07-2012, 05:45
Correct.

AndrewG23
04-07-2012, 07:22
Yea i dont see a dealer letting you cycle ammo. But could always ask if they have snap caps. Could help with a function check.

SSott
06-11-2012, 19:10
hi points have a lifetime, no questions asked warranty and it does not matter if you are the first or the 1000 owner. jus sayin! (995's are fun guns!)

Not to derail but they sent me new grips because I screwed them up trying to stipple them and they broke, I offered to pay and they would not accept the money. Good CS.

p.s. I like my Glock better :supergrin:

whiskerz
06-13-2012, 19:54
I looked at 1 once that looked like the frame had been attacked with chemicals it was melted. Other than that , I bought a Glock in a ziplock bag mismatched missing parts . I took it to Glock they rebuilt it for free and made it better than new . I am a happy customer

dbyer1
06-13-2012, 21:03
Check firing pin safety pull trigger on empty chamber hold trigger shake gun next to ear should rattle now cycle slide should not rattle, some other little things to check. Most problems other than damage slide or frame can be fixed for not a lot of money

dunndealin
09-05-2012, 08:32
Not to sounds like a total newb here, but I have been adding a few glocks to my stable recently, and the presence of the "copper" colored lube is from the factory correct? I put a used 19 on law away yesterday and it looked like new and had the copper stuff all over the slide rails. It looked like it had never been fired, or just had a really good cleaning.


ETA: sorry for bringing up an old thread

SSott
09-05-2012, 08:47
It is factory but some people continue to re-use it I would assume? Sounds like you have a nice weapon!

JimFS
12-01-2012, 23:09
An somewhat unrelated item. I am not sure where you live. But her in IL, the no carry land, even private sales need a three day waiting period. A LE was hassled on this a while back. So purchase but pick up three days latter? Not sure how we are expected to prove this?

silverfd
02-15-2013, 05:17
hi points have a lifetime, no questions asked warranty and it does not matter if you are the first or the 1000 owner. jus sayin! (995's are fun guns!)


I agree, My C9 hi point runs great and has actually saved my life while my $2000+ handguns sat in a safe at home.

maxmanta
02-15-2013, 20:00
In the near future, I will be looking at my first potential purchase of a used Glock (I've always bought new) and I'm curious as to what you would specifically look for when inspecting used Glocks (or any gun for that matter) prior to purchase. I will probably not have a chance to shoot this gun before making my decision. My checklist currently includes:

1. Visual inspection of exterior for damage, scars, wear.
2. Dry fire for function.
3. Load mags for function.
4. Cycle loaded mag through gun by racking slide.
5. Field strip
6. Inspect internals for cleanliness, wear.
7. Check documentation of test fire date, S/N, matching numbers
8. Check for aftermarket internals.

Your suggestions to add to this list will be appreciated.

Remember the recoil spring test:

-Make sure the gun is unloaded (I know this goes w/o saying, but...)

-Dry fire the gun.

-Hold the trigger back and pull the slide back all the way and hold it.

-Point the muzzle straight up and SLOWLY let the slide go forward.

-The gun should go completely into battery. If it doesn't, you need a new recoil spring assembly.

glocked-up
03-29-2013, 19:48
Great thread. Thanks for all of info. I would feel pretty comfortable purchasing a used gun. Utilizing all of the posts, here's the current check sheet:


1. Visual inspection of exterior for damage, scars, wear.
2. Look for hogged out pin holes in the frame. Press them out and put them back to make sure everything is correct.
3. Check the breach face. If it has a inward dimple around the firing pin hole, this will indicate the pistol has been shot alot, maybe with hot hand loads.
4. Check recoil spring by aiming gun verticle (unloaded), no magazine, pull slide back and slowly let forward to see how slide goes into full battery.
5. Load mags for function.
6. Cycle loaded mag through gun by racking slide.
7. Dry fire for function. With the trigger held back, push on the top of the chamber. If there is a lot of movement, it's pretty worn. If there is just a little, less so, but keep in mind, even the new guns will have a little play when you do this.
8. Field strip
9. Inspect internals for cleanliness, wear.
10. Check for aftermarket internals.
11. Run your pinched fingers down the barrel feeling for bulges.
12. Look for any rings or pitting IN the barrel.
13. Make sure the extractor is not broken
14.Check documentation of test fire date, S/N, matching numbers

Looking at a used 17. Can someone explain or show a pic of the breach face, I'm not exactly sure what I should be looking for. Also pulling the trigger and holding it back and pushing on chamber should this be done with the slide on or off? Is there anyone that can shed more light on these two "tests"..thanks

cobalt327
04-01-2013, 20:00
Looking at a used 17. Can someone explain or show a pic of the breach face, I'm not exactly sure what I should be looking for. Also pulling the trigger and holding it back and pushing on chamber should this be done with the slide on or off? Is there anyone that can shed more light on these two "tests"..thanksTop photo from here (http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?p=19923510#post19923510).


The breech face is part of the slide. In the photo, the oblong slot is where the firing pin protrudes. The depression is caused by excessive pressures.

http://i1163.photobucket.com/albums/q547/vaqueroaleman/IMG_0011-1.jpg


Other damage to the breech face can be caused by hot gasses bypassing the primers (gun is a 1911):
http://img845.imageshack.us/img845/2550/img1669.jpg


A thread showing several more damaged breeches here (http://www.handgunforum.net/glock/18537-glock-breech-face-failures.html).

tchance
04-03-2013, 18:25
Thank You all for providing these "notes to self" & especially cobalt327. I'm in the market for a used 26 & now have a few visuals. Thanks!

98LS-WON
04-04-2013, 00:22
Might be a dumb question, but why should I care if the numbers match. Assuming it functions well and isn't cracked/corroded/bent.

tchance
04-04-2013, 05:39
Might be a dumb question, but why should I care if the numbers match. Assuming it functions well and isn't cracked/corroded/bent.

I wonder the same. At the end of the day, isn't the barrel the only S/N we should be concerned with?

CountryBoy865
07-03-2013, 09:48
So true....

Most LE guns may look worn to all hell, but a lot of that is just holster wear, and exposure. They undergo routine maintenance for the most part, and fired somewhat regularly to ensure functionality (and officer ability) and are usually very well taken care of.

What a difference knowing that your weapon most likely will be your lifeline in an oh S$%& situation sure does make you want to take much better care of it.

I admit, some of my weapons do not receive near the maintenance or care that my go to weapons do, but all get cleaned/checked after use.

True my Glock 22 3rd gen was a police issue gun and it has a lot of holster wear but the barrel and internals dont look bad at all.

Cashgap
07-03-2013, 10:11
I wonder the same. At the end of the day, isn't the barrel the only S/N we should be concerned with?

The frame, in the US. The barrel as I understand it in Europe. The slide, no where to my knowledge.

But all three matching is the default valuation, mismatching normally lowers the value.

cobalt327
07-03-2013, 22:31
Might be a dumb question, but why should I care if the numbers match. Assuming it functions well and isn't cracked/corroded/bent.

I wonder the same. At the end of the day, isn't the barrel the only S/N we should be concerned with?In the case of the Glock, the s/n are on both the frame and barrel, but it's the s/n on the frame that you want to be sure matches the paperwork. That's to say Glock barrels are not considered to be "the gun" the way Glock frames are. In the case of the Ruger Mark series pistols (as just one example), the barrel- which is attached to the receiver- is considered to be "the gun", and it's where the serial numbers reside.

But back to Glocks- that the barrel s/n doesn't match the frame s/n would be of little concern to me, as long as the barrel is correct for the application. Used factory Glock barrels are sold all the time, a popular conversion is using a factory G35 barrel on a G22, for instance (this gives an extended barrel G22). In the case of aftermarket barrels, they have no s/n, period.

The cool thing about owning a Glock is that you can return the pistol to Glock for factory servicing, regardless of the age of the weapon, or even that you might not be the original owner. I have heard that even frames have been replaced in extreme cases. You'd be charged for upgrades like night sights; I think I heard it was $55 for new night sights, installed and sighted in at their range (by them).

Case in point, I recently bought an ex-police department issued G22C. It was clean and in seemingly good condition w/the exception of some odd wear/damage to the firing pin and peeling/missing plating on the firing pin safety (thread and photos on this can be seen here (http://glock.pro/glock-tech-warranty/6795-cause-firing-pin-fp-safety-wear.html)).

I returned the pistol to Glock in Smyrna (I'm fairly local to them) and they replaced every part w/the exception of the frame, slide and sights. They even swapped out my used magazine for a new one! And they were aware from the get-go that I was not the original owner. I couldn't have been more pleased w/the service and treatment- everyone there from the guard shack to the armorer seemed to be in a good mood- like they sincerely enjoyed their employment w/Glock.

More on my visit here (http://glock.pro/glock-pistols/7110-recent-trip-glock-smyrna.html#post79338).

For those not near enough to drive to Glock, I would look into shipping them your gun. Many don't realize that for repair/servicing, etc. you can privately (no FFL needed) mail and receive back a gun you own. There are specific requirements to do this, so check first before sending anything!

Glock contact info (http://us.glock.com/customer-service/contact-us).

Ryobi
07-04-2013, 05:37
Mismatching normally has no affect on value. It's routine. When glock replaces a major part, it doesn't match the original SN. The frame, in the US. The barrel as I understand it in Europe. The slide, no where to my knowledge.

But all three matching is the default valuation, mismatching normally lowers the value.

cadillacguns
07-07-2013, 07:36
Please check the frame(s) for stress fractures or cracking, hard to see but I have a couple 2,5 gen baby Glocks with hairline cracks/stress fractures on the top left side one by the top pin, the other by the slide lock hole.:faint:

Caustic117
07-07-2013, 14:12
One trick if you can't shoot the gun before you buy it. Take a #2 pencil and place it in the barrel of the gun. Point the gun straight up and dry fire. If the striker and everything inside the slide is in good shape the pencil should fly up about 4-6 ft in the air.

I remember hearing this from some one on here.


Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

opaul
07-23-2013, 13:21
Matching serial numbers on the receiver and frame shouldn't matter, according the Glock representative I spoke with. If the slide is ever replaced on a frame, by Glock, you are going to end up with different serial numbers.