Reloading in an apartment [Archive] - Glock Talk

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jstang
12-10-2009, 15:54
Well to keep this simple I am looking into reloading and the only thing that i feel may prevent me is that i live in an apartment. I live on my own and do not have any roomates. I also have a large closet I would be able to put a table in and work in. Are there any reasons not to do so, and if I can would it be wise to work in an isolated area such as the closet.
Thanks
J

sarge
12-10-2009, 16:14
I don't see a problem with either.

DoctaGlockta
12-10-2009, 16:14
Make sure you tell your super. I'm sure he'll be excited :)

Seriously, don't let the small space be an excuse. I reload on a desk in my office with a handpress. Everything I need fits in a tool box that I keep locked up when I'm not using it. Great skill to learn and very rewarding. Good luck.

fredj338
12-10-2009, 16:16
When I was in college I turned my coat closet into a reloading room. Put a lock or dead bolt on it so the manager doesn't go snooping. Also doubles as a safe place to store your guns & ammo. It's a small space but certainly workable.

Jon_R
12-10-2009, 16:23
Make sure you have good light. If you are working with exposed lead or doing casting make sure you have very good ventilation.

pangloss9
12-10-2009, 16:27
I can't think of a good reason not too. I wish I had a spare closet somewhere in my house that I could use for that purpose.

Colorado4Wheel
12-10-2009, 16:31
I made the mistake of thinking my 900 sqft place was too small for a progressive press. Reality is with a little forthought you can easily make it work. I used my kitchen table and C-Clamped the press (attached to a big board) to the table. I then attached the that board to the wall with a removable bolt (expanding wall anchor). The board had the L bracket to attach to the wall. Once the press was C-Clamped to the table and the bolt was attached to the two wall anchors the table was very solid.

dudel
12-10-2009, 17:38
My first "bench" was in a small closet. I put a set of 2x4 rails around 3/4 of the closet and set a heavy board on the rails. Worked fine for two years. Easy to take down, or leave up as needed. Close the door, and it was secure. Easy enough to put a good lock on it if needed.

Welcome to the madness.

GioaJack
12-10-2009, 18:12
I shall refrain from making any comments on the obvious difference between going into a closet... and coming out of one. :whistling:

Jack

IndyGunFreak
12-10-2009, 18:23
Well to keep this simple I am looking into reloading and the only thing that i feel may prevent me is that i live in an apartment. I live on my own and do not have any roomates. I also have a large closet I would be able to put a table in and work in. Are there any reasons not to do so, and if I can would it be wise to work in an isolated area such as the closet.
Thanks
J

I don't see a problem. I've heard of some folks using those craftsman portable benches. Obviously you wouldn't be able to put a huge press on it, but would probably work fine w/ a 550 or LCT, or maybe even a Loadmaster.

IGF

Colorado4Wheel
12-10-2009, 20:00
I don't see a problem. I've heard of some folks using those craftsman portable benches. Obviously you wouldn't be able to put a huge press on it, but would probably work fine w/ a 550 or LCT, or maybe even a Loadmaster.

IGF

Thats the thing. It won't matter. Brace the base properly to a wall and put whatever you want on it. I doubt even a casefeeder would matter if the base is attached to the wall for additional support. Thats really the key.

n2extrm
12-10-2009, 20:20
Made alot of ammo on my little bench in a 9X9 room!

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu89/n2extrm/100_0884.jpg

I even had a trimmer and swager on there at one point. I would put the scale on a small desk by my laptop behind me! This could be built in a closet easilly.

jstang
12-11-2009, 01:25
Thanks for all of the replys Im sure this is the first question of many more to come. I move next friday, and I have a table I built out of some scrap wood a while ago I will use as a bench. For some reason when I built it I felt the need to use all of the wood I had so its very sturdy, 4x4's for legs and 2x4's for support. Think I'll go buy a book tomorrow to get started on some reading. Hopefully after christmas and the move I'll have some money left to start.

J

Hydraulicman
12-11-2009, 04:39
Thanks for all of the replys Im sure this is the first question of many more to come. I move next friday, and I have a table I built out of some scrap wood a while ago I will use as a bench. For some reason when I built it I felt the need to use all of the wood I had so its very sturdy, 4x4's for legs and 2x4's for support. Think I'll go buy a book tomorrow to get started on some reading. Hopefully after christmas and the move I'll have some money left to start.

J

how much ammunition do you need?

Landric
12-11-2009, 07:00
I started handloading in 1994. I bought a house (finally) in 2008. During all that time between (except the time I lived in an apartment that really was too small for handloading-about 400 square feet), I lived in apartments and I handloaded. Provided you have even a little spare to put your stuff, I don't see any reason not to do it. I wouldn't cast in an apartment, but handloading is no problem.

PEC-Memphis
12-11-2009, 09:10
When I started reloading (16 yrs old), my bedroom had a walk-in closet, which served as my clothes closet, magazine storage (lots of Road & Track and Gun & Ammo), and reloading room. I reloaded thousands of rounds of pistol and rifle cartridges on a RCBS single stage press.

I've seen some people use a Black and Decker workmate as a folding reloading table - they seem to work pretty well even with a progresive press - like a Dillion 550.

Gunnuts10mm
12-11-2009, 10:38
If you like your neighbors, you may want to mind your tumbler running time.

jstang
12-11-2009, 12:13
how much ammunition do you need?

I usually try to shoot once a week. Right now I've slowed down on the centerfire little and have been sticking to the .22's for cost. I would like to get back to shooting about 500rds .40 and 200rds 5.56 a month.

J

mteagle1
12-11-2009, 13:35
I've got a Dillon 550 mounted on a board clamped to the kitchen table. No longer keep records but it's 10K+ 45ACP another 5K+ 9MM and a couple K 5.56.

Three-Five-Seven
12-11-2009, 14:26
My single stage presses can be operated quietly, if not silently. My progressive presses are entirely too noisy for an apartment -- particularly if one is on some floor other than the first.

stengun
12-12-2009, 10:32
Howdy jstang,

I reloaded before when I lived in an apartment.

What I did was I took a piece of 3/4" plywood about 12"x18' and using countersunk 1/4" bolts mounted the press, a RCBS single stage Partner press, to the piece of plywood. Then I took a piece a carpet that I got form a place like Home Depot and glued it to the back side of the plywood.

I then used cheap 6" C-clamps to clamp my press to the bar in the kitchen. I used this for about 18 monthes until I bought a house and during this time loaded over 5,000rds of 40cal and 45ACP with this setup. It worked great and some where in my shop, I still have the carpeted plywood base.

Paul

9x45
12-12-2009, 12:01
Really doesn't take much space at all. Here is a Dillon Square Deal setup which is 18" deep and 36" across (the 45 degree brace).

Hydraulicman
12-12-2009, 13:25
Really doesn't take much space at all. Here is a Dillon Square Deal setup which is 18" deep and 36" across (the 45 degree brace).

nice set up. a progressive like the SDB and the 550B don't take up more more room than a single stage. and If you consider the fact that the SDB and 550 have the measure ontop of the press not taking up additional room on your loading bench.

chris in va
12-12-2009, 21:52
FWIW all my reloading equipment fits in a 18"x18" box. I sit and reload while watching a movie or something.

Have a look at the Lee Hand Press kit.

BTW no need for a tumbler, I clean my brass by dumping them in a small bucket then swishing in a solution of warm water, vinegar and salt. Gets all the dirt off! Not pretty like polished brass but I haven't had any issues after about 2000 rounds reloaded.

mteagle1
12-13-2009, 11:26
Another choice would be the Midway portable reloading stand, it has replaceable tables and came with a drill pattern for different tools. The top of the table is approx 24" off the floor, I've got 1 stand and 3 tables for my shotgun presses.

Fanner50
12-13-2009, 21:57
My Black&Decker Workmate loading bench. I use it inside when it's too hot or too cold to load in the garage.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e339/AlanFla/IMG_1678.jpg
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e339/AlanFla/IMG_1680.jpg
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e339/AlanFla/IMG_1681.jpg

shadow500
12-13-2009, 22:07
My guest room closet was my loading room for a few years and actually has still a reloading bench built into it. There is more than enough room in a closet, and it is kind of nice to be in the house and being able to just close the closet door when you are done loading.

Chris

kilroy2721
12-13-2009, 22:22
Years ago when I lived in an apartment I used a saw horse and clamped the press down to the saw horse. I tried to keep it hidden and out of sight during the day as sometimes the Landlord would come around for pest control or maintenance. It was just a matter of time before they saw it and they even told me that I had to remove it or I would be evicted. I refused, they then called the fire marshall but he didn't do anything either, because I had only 2lbs of powder, and was not stockpiling it. Long story short I had to threaten them with legal action and they finally left me alone.

marcclarke
04-26-2010, 21:59
Well to keep this simple I am looking into reloading and the only thing that i feel may prevent me is that i live in an apartment. I live on my own and do not have any roomates. I also have a large closet I would be able to put a table in and work in. Are there any reasons not to do so, and if I can would it be wise to work in an isolated area such as the closet.
Thanks
J
I reloaded in an apartment for years. All you need is a heavy table. I bought a Sears workbench and loaded it down with sand bags so it didn't move around when I cycled my press.

Orlando Eric
04-27-2010, 23:02
http://glocktalk.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=154&pictureid=1087

Sears for cheap. Roll it away when not loading pull it out when loading.

SDGlock23
04-28-2010, 11:43
My reloading setup is in my closet, which is about 4x7 in size, but it's plenty really (for me right now). I have my Dillon 550B and Lee single stage resting on some wooden boards I bought at Lowes and put together. It works very well!!

http://img130.imageshack.us/img130/3913/crb9209.jpg

Beware Owner
04-28-2010, 13:30
Go for it.