lubing carbide dies [Archive] - Glock Talk

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fkenyon
12-23-2009, 19:11
Do you guys EVER lube your pistol brass? Seems like an occasional lube (every 200 rnds or so) would be good. Then again, lube attracts dirt.

Just wondering...

RustyFN
12-23-2009, 19:19
I don't but there are a lot of people that do. To me it is a waste of time because the lube has to be cleaned off after. I think most of the people that do load on a progressive where they have 4 or 5 things happening at the same time. I load on a Lee classic turret and it doesn't make much difference.

fredj338
12-23-2009, 19:43
Many guys do, for the most part I don't. I will lube the longer magnum cases, just makes sizing easier. On service rounds, almost never, unless I have an issue w/ a certain brand of brass being difficult. It does smooth things out quite a bit, but then why spend fo rthe carbide dies, just lube & use steel dies.

n2extrm
12-23-2009, 20:05
I do not on my carbide dies on a 550. I figure like Fred said. Why buy carbide if you are going to lube? I do lube all rifle cases, even when neck sizing.

Boxerglocker
12-23-2009, 21:25
Do you guys EVER lube your pistol brass? Seems like an occasional lube (every 200 rnds or so) would be good. Then again, lube attracts dirt.

Just wondering...

All the time... use Horandy One Shot... no not necessary... carbide dies on my SDB... but makes a big difference in the amount of effort required to manipulate the press. Easier on the equipment and the operator too.

Hoser
12-23-2009, 21:48
Hornady One Shot always.

One can lasts a long time and makes things a lot easier.

Cant hurt, might help...

8Ring
12-23-2009, 22:25
Before decapping and priming brass, I take about 20 cleaned cases, turn them upside down on a piece of newspaper or old towel, and squirt one side with case lube. I start the process with one or two of these partially lubed cases, then use a partially lubed one every 5th case or when it feels like friction is building up. This keeps the carbide dies smooth and reduces the effort needed to resize cases.

Turning the cases upside down keeps the lube from getting inside.

Chris

ede
12-24-2009, 05:56
HOS all the time, really makes a progressive press run.

Murphy's Law
12-24-2009, 06:00
I use the trick of HOS sprayed in a baggie and works like a champ. Makes everything run much smoother. As far as cleaning the dies......have yet to do so and it's been nearly 2 years.

PBKing
12-24-2009, 06:12
I didnt use to lube with my carbide dies but I do now only for magnum cases, as mentioned it is much easier.

Colorado4Wheel
12-24-2009, 08:06
Do you guys EVER lube your pistol brass? Seems like an occasional lube (every 200 rnds or so) would be good. Then again, lube attracts dirt.

Just wondering...

I use Lee's Lube. Mix a entire tube with a 16oz bottle of 99% alcohol. It's very hard to mix but then I put it in a spray bottle. I spray a big zip lock bag a couple times at the most and dump in the brass. It drys nearly immediately. Never feels oily. Makes longer sessions at the press much nicer. I spend about $2 a year at the most with this stuff so it's worth it to me.

RustyFN
12-24-2009, 16:28
I use Lee's Lube. Mix a entire tube with a 16oz bottle of 99% alcohol.

Can you still drink the shine with the lube mixed in? :supergrin:

njl
12-24-2009, 17:18
With carbide pistol caliber dies, you don't have you lube, but if you've never tried it, you should. On my RL550B, it makes a huge difference in the amount of effort it takes to resize 9mm. I use a little lanolin on my thumb and finger and generally don't do anything to remove it.

RLDS45S
12-24-2009, 18:35
Here is my experience......I like to polish my brass in Iosso laced corn cob media. This seems to make the cases slicker....In combination with Redding Titanium Pro Series Dies makes 45ACP fly thru loading on the 550. Now, with 9mm I lube up a case with Imperia Die Wax about every 15 or so with Dillon Carbide dies make things work qutie well. I will spritz DCL on 44 Magnums using Redding Titanium Dies this just smoothes out the loading process. A fellow I know who loads just about anything pistol on Super 1050 and he uses HOS to spritz all calibers when loading.....

Colorado4Wheel
12-24-2009, 18:36
Can you still drink the shine with the lube mixed in? :supergrin:

If you don't mind going blind you can drink it.:shocked:

RLDS45S
12-24-2009, 18:44
Yepper Rusty that would work out to be 198 Proof! Can We Say Methyl Alcohol Poisoning?

But you may like the treatment
Wikipedia says:
Methanol poisoning can be treated with the antidotes ethanol or fomepizole.[6][9][10] Both of these drugs act to reduce the action of alcohol dehydrogenase on methanol by means of competitive inhibition, so that it is excreted by the kidneys rather than being transformed into toxic metabolites.[6] Further treatment may include giving sodium bicarbonate for metabolic acidosis and haemodialysis or haemodiafiltration can be used to remove methanol and formate from the blood.[6] Folinic acid or folic acid is also administered to enhance the metabolism of formate.[6]

njl
12-24-2009, 19:12
So if you're going to drink your lube, use pure ethanol. BTW, I bet Steve's using Isopropyl, not Methanol. That's what's typically sold as alcohol in the store.

Colorado4Wheel
12-24-2009, 19:14
My favorite alcoholic beverage is old brake fluid, filtered thru old socks and left to ferment in the sun. Tasty.

RustyFN
12-24-2009, 20:48
Sorry bad joke. I didn't realize nobody would know what moonshine was. It's popular around here and you won't go blind drinking it.

Hound_dogs_01
12-24-2009, 22:11
I lube the threads on the out side body of the die where you screw it into the press and the bullet plunger seater thingy do dad theads. other wise I've never lubed any of my carbide dies.

Carbie is so hard that it doesnt require lubing is what i was told. And if I did feel the need to lube the indoe of the die to use graphite powder.... or a dry lube

Alex

Hoser
12-25-2009, 09:40
Carbie is so hard that it doesnt require lubing is what i was told.

You are 100% correct. If you are using carbide dies, lube is not required. But man it makes things about a gazillion times easier.

G19lover
12-25-2009, 18:22
Even with carbide I give my cases a shot of spray rcbs lube, greatly reduces the effort!

dudel
12-26-2009, 03:26
All the time... use Horandy One Shot... no not necessary... carbide dies on my SDB... but makes a big difference in the amount of effort required to manipulate the press. Easier on the equipment and the operator too.

Never found it took all that much effort on the Rock Chucker to size a pistol case. Clean brass and clean dies do it for me. Many clean their brass; but not their dies. A clean sizer die takes much less effort than a dirty one.

Now M1 Carbine, that's another story. Even with carbide dies, I lube those cases. Same with .223.

For those who lube their cases, how do you go about getting the lube off? Not a good thing to fire the still lubed cases.

G19lover
12-26-2009, 05:46
I tumble my rounds for a bit after loading. Removes the lube and shines them up.

sourdough44
12-26-2009, 06:24
I use a touch of lube every 5th case or so.

HarveyatPC
12-27-2009, 05:18
I didn't lube the first year and all my Lee dies got rusty in the garage? Now I spray all but the Dillon Dies - they always shine!
I also lube 44s and 45s. Its easy on the hand/arm when you reloading 400 plus.

Colorado4Wheel
12-27-2009, 08:41
Lubing the dies on the outside protects from rust. We have been talking about lubing the cases so they run more smoothly in the sizing die. Does nothing to protect from rust.

Donutrcng
12-27-2009, 11:16
+1 on the effort. Not required, but saves the arm.

SFCSMITH(RET)
12-27-2009, 12:53
50k or more through my 10mm dies, never a drop of lube.

freakshow10mm
12-27-2009, 21:24
I use lube on my ammo when loading pistol. Keeps things running smoother, less working of the brass, less wear on the dies. I also load in larger volumes than the average handloader.

njl
12-27-2009, 21:36
I use lube on my ammo when loading pistol. Keeps things running smoother, less working of the brass, less wear on the dies. I also load in larger volumes than the average handloader.

As you load commercially, I'm curious what you use and what you do (if anything) about removing it.

I think you've posted that you tumble briefly after loading.

I've been using a very small amount of pure lanolin, and at least on my 9mm, I haven't noticed any ill effects from doing nothing to remove it.

I've used commercial ammo that really seemed to have some kind of dry lube (probably graphite) all over the outside. I think it was S&B 9mm about 8 years ago. Just loading a few mags of it would get my finger tips all dirty.

ki4dmh
12-27-2009, 22:16
I haven't ever lubed my carbide dies but I might try it after reading this thread to see how much difference it makes.

VN350X10
12-27-2009, 22:29
I load a large quanity of .45 ACP at a time (not as much as Freak !) & every 100 or so in the case feeder of the 1050, I put in 4 or 5 that have been lubed w/Lee lube, mixed with alky (I do use methanol, as we keep racing fuel on hand).
This, combined with the agitation in the feeder, puts a bit of the lube on most of the cases & makes it a noticably bit easier on a long run of ammo.
And NO, I don't try to drink it ! But if Rusty would send along some good 'shine, I'd say thank you !
The lube isn't NECSSARY, but it's a labor saver overall.
The .45's are the only caliber I use it on, but might try it on the 9mm thou.

uncle albert

Boxerglocker
12-27-2009, 23:50
For those who lube their cases, how do you go about getting the lube off? Not a good thing to fire the still lubed cases.

I don't remove the HOS lube... I tried both ways and determined that removing it was really not necessary. HOS is such a dry lube it really doesn't leave any residue. I would have to agree with BE claims that is in fact helps enhance feeding in auto loaders by leaving the HOS lube on finished cases.

Colorado4Wheel
12-28-2009, 06:50
Lee Lube does not need to be removed. It gone once you size anyway. It's not oily and you can't tell it's present at all once you load the round. It's just not as shinny. If you want it gone tumble the rounds for a couple minutes.

freakshow10mm
12-28-2009, 07:32
As you load commercially, I'm curious what you use and what you do (if anything) about removing it.

I think you've posted that you tumble briefly after loading.

I've been using a very small amount of pure lanolin, and at least on my 9mm, I haven't noticed any ill effects from doing nothing to remove it.

I've used commercial ammo that really seemed to have some kind of dry lube (probably graphite) all over the outside. I think it was S&B 9mm about 8 years ago. Just loading a few mags of it would get my finger tips all dirty.
I use HOS (Hornady One Shot). Used to use it for rifle but after I stuck several '06 cases I gave up. Trying the Dillon stuff for rifle now. Trial by fire as I took a small pre-order for 47,000 rounds of .223 (sold 45,000 of it in less than 13 hours :wow:).

You will really tell a different with tapered cases like the 9mm Luger or long skinny cases like the 32 H&R, and the special/magnum families.

Little goes a long way too. I use a 2.5 gallon bucket to move brass from the storage bins to the loading press. Before I dump them in the case feeder, I spray the top of the bucket of brass as if I'm spraying Pam on a skillet. Just cover the top with a quick spray. Then shake the bucket up to turn the brass over a few times. That's usually enough to coat most if not at least half the brass. It's not necessary to make sure every piece is lubed, just get a good number of them and it will be fine. You aren't preventing anything, you are just making things smoother, so don't get too hung up on coverage.

After the ammo is loaded I tumble for maybe 15 minutes or so in a 1/8 walnut to corncob ratio with a cap each of NuFinish and mineral spirits.

HOS dries out enough to be left on, but I remove it anyway. Looks shinier without and my clients like shiny ammo.

unclebob
12-28-2009, 07:37
You can also too remove the lube off of the case is spray a rag towel. If you are married don’t use a good one. Spray it with brake cleaner, add the rounds, grab the two ends and shake the rounds back and forth like when cleaning a bowling ball.

Wyoming
01-06-2010, 15:23
You don't need to lube cases when using carbide dies. When I used a single station press I never used lube with carbide dies. If I were to use a single station press to reload now I probably wouldn't use lube. When I'm using Dillion 550 I just spray a little on the outside of cases while they are on cookie sheet before sizing. It is not much effort to do BUT it makes a big differents in ease of reloading. Remember a little goes a very long way.

unclebob
01-06-2010, 16:12
You don't need to lube cases when using carbide dies. When I used a single station press I never used lube with carbide dies. If I were to use a single station press to reload now I probably wouldn't use lube. When I'm using Dillion 550 I just spray a little on the outside of cases while they are on cookie sheet before sizing. It is not much effort to do BUT it makes a big differents in ease of reloading. Remember a little goes a very long way.

Most carbide pistol dies you do not need too lube. Rifle carbide dies you do.

G36_Me
01-07-2010, 09:47
Sorry bad joke. I didn't realize nobody would know what moonshine was. It's popular around here and you won't go blind drinking it.

'shine' and I had a bad date just this past Christmas.

so... if you use a cheap whiskey instead of alcohol, can you drink it then. There must be a way to combine hobbies here.

Wyoming
01-07-2010, 20:37
Unclebob, I was referring to lubing very lightly pistol cases. As I said, you don't need to but when using a Dillion progressive press I lightly lube cases. I got the idea from Dillion. I always lube rifle cases because all my dies are steal. If I were to buy a carbide rifle die I would light lube cases if I were using a progressive press such as a Dillion.

Just because you don't have to doesn't mean you can't! When you are loading 1000's at a time it makes a big deference. I find that the spray lubes (Dillions and Hornady) are easy to use and clean up is a snap. I inspect EVERY round of ammo so I'm handling each round. I will put 50 rounds in a old tray from an ammo box and run my finger over every primer to feel for a high primer. One time I found were a primer some how seated upside down. I have been using Dillions now for two decades so I have come up with a system that works for me.

FWTW, I never needed a bullet puller until I started using progressive reloading presses. I use them for reloading and I handload on a single station press. There is a deference.

:thumbsup:

GioaJack
01-07-2010, 20:50
A simple little tip for that one stubborn case and the can of lube is all the way across the room... use an old artist trick... nose oil.

Seriously, I'm not kidding. Rub your index finger across the corner of your nose down toward your lip, it will pick up the natural oil that collects there. Rub the case with your finger and it will leave enough of an oil film to run that case through the sizing die.

Of course if you're Italian you'll have enough oil to do several thousand cases.

Note to bob2223 and Cobra64, run your finger across the corner of your nose... not in your nose. :whistling:

Jack

stengun
01-07-2010, 22:44
Howdy,

I do. I use the Dillion spray lube.

I use a RCBS single stage press so I lube my brass before resizing.

Since I wash my brass before I prime it, it's no big deal.

Paul

Bob2223
01-08-2010, 06:34
A simple little tip for that one stubborn case and the can of lube is all the way across the room... use an old artist trick... nose oil.

Seriously, I'm not kidding. Rub your index finger across the corner of your nose down toward your lip, it will pick up the natural oil that collects there. Rub the case with your finger and it will leave enough of an oil film to run that case through the sizing die.

Of course if you're Italian you'll have enough oil to do several thousand cases.

Note to bob2223 and Cobra64, run your finger across the corner of your nose... not in your nose. :whistling:

Jack

Oh boy, now the old man is talking about how to use bodily fluids to reload?
:faint:

Bob

unclebob
01-08-2010, 07:11
Unclebob, I was referring to lubing very lightly pistol cases. As I said, you don't need to but when using a Dillion progressive press I lightly lube cases. I got the idea from Dillion. I always lube rifle cases because all my dies are steal. If I were to buy a carbide rifle die I would light lube cases if I were using a progressive press such as a Dillion.

Just because you don't have to doesn't mean you can't! When you are loading 1000's at a time it makes a big deference. I find that the spray lubes (Dillions and Hornady) are easy to use and clean up is a snap. I inspect EVERY round of ammo so I'm handling each round. I will put 50 rounds in a old tray from an ammo box and run my finger over every primer to feel for a high primer. One time I found were a primer some how seated upside down. I have been using Dillions now for two decades so I have come up with a system that works for me.

FWTW, I never needed a bullet puller until I started using progressive reloading presses. I use them for reloading and I handload on a single station press. There is a deference.

:thumbsup:

I guess I did not explain myself very well. Yes carbide pistol dies you may or may not need too lube the case. Yes most of the press manufactures suggest lubing all case’s even 9mm. It well put less stain on the press and you. The point that I was trying too make is for carbide rifle dies you have too lube the case. You still treat it like just like a plain steel die.
Also in lubing your pistol cases you do not need too lube all of the cases. Just lube ¼ to ½ of them then mix them in with the other cases you well be loading. There is enough lube left in the sizer die too lube the ones that were not lubed.

Colorado4Wheel
01-08-2010, 09:21
A simple little tip for that one stubborn case and the can of lube is all the way across the room... use an old artist trick... nose oil.

Seriously, I'm not kidding. Rub your index finger across the corner of your nose down toward your lip, it will pick up the natural oil that collects there. Rub the case with your finger and it will leave enough of an oil film to run that case through the sizing die.

Of course if you're Italian you'll have enough oil to do several thousand cases.

Note to bob2223 and Cobra64, run your finger across the corner of your nose... not in your nose. :whistling:

Jack

I will keep this in mind when we shoot together.:whistling:

GioaJack
01-08-2010, 09:48
I will keep this in mind when we shoot together.:whistling:


Apparently I took way too many meds last night, I'm starting to hallucinate... I SEE RED... I SEE RED. The Mayans were right, the world is coming to an end!

And there were still so many women left. :crying:

Jack

DEADLYACCURATE
01-08-2010, 14:06
I never have, and don't plan on it in the future.

WiskyT
01-08-2010, 14:22
A simple little tip for that one stubborn case and the can of lube is all the way across the room... use an old artist trick... nose oil.

Seriously, I'm not kidding. Rub your index finger across the corner of your nose down toward your lip, it will pick up the natural oil that collects there. Rub the case with your finger and it will leave enough of an oil film to run that case through the sizing die.

Of course if you're Italian you'll have enough oil to do several thousand cases.

Note to bob2223 and Cobra64, run your finger across the corner of your nose... not in your nose. :whistling:

Jack

STOP!!! Don't listen to Jack on this one. He has snuck a little Lincoln wax on your case and you will walk around the rest of the day with a black streak down your nose.

Hound_dogs_01
01-08-2010, 15:10
I lube all my rifle brass when resizing... i use that hornady case lube in the little tub.... I havent really gotten into pistol loading yet....


Alex

GioaJack
01-08-2010, 16:31
STOP!!! Don't listen to Jack on this one. He has snuck a little Lincoln wax on your case and you will walk around the rest of the day with a black streak down your nose.


Okay, you guys can snicker all you want... you're just jealous that Michelangelo took a liking to me when I was a teenager and taught me this little artist trick.

Because of this overt lack of respect I'm not going to let you in on the secrets of loading with reclaimed powder, how to make unlimited supplies of #2 alloy using everyday supplies found in your kitchen cereal cabinet and the biggest secret of all... how to date Heather Locklear without having to lose weight or increase your bank balance by six zeros and two commas.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I see by my caller ID that Heather is calling me again... buying all these Viagra pills is starting to cut into my primer budget. :whistling:

Jack

crazymoose
01-08-2010, 16:33
R.I.P. Lubing Carbide. :supergrin:

Sorry, couldn't help myself.