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Billy_Ray
12-30-2009, 21:25
I recieved for Christmas a new reloading press, reloading accessories and I built a sturdy bench for it, so I am almost ready to start reloading. I have read the ABCs of Reloading and studied one reloading manual (I have another on order). I have also been reading posts here for the last couple months. But I have not seen this addressed in any of the above sources...

So my question is which recipe/powder do you start with for a given caliber/bullet combination?

Thank you,
Billy Ray

buckshotshorty
12-30-2009, 21:35
Billy-Ray congrats on your new acquisition. To help you, refine your search, we need more information. Are you loading rifle or pistol? Are you loading target or higher speed loads? What calibers will you be loading and what bullet weights?

Since we are on the Glock forum, I will assume that you're talking pistol here. I currently use a lot of WSF powder, but if I had to choose one powder do it all; I would say HP-38/ WW 231 (same stuff) is the one powder that can handle all your needs. Hotter loads and larger calibers Unique works well.
.

tlafrance
12-30-2009, 21:36
+1 on WW231. Loads everything from .25acp to .44mag, just about the most universal powder around. I buy it in 8# kegs :cool:

Tom

Billy_Ray
12-30-2009, 21:37
Billy-Ray congrats on your new acquisition. To help you, refine your search, we need more information. Are you loading rifle or pistol? Are you loading target or higher speed loads? What calibers will you be loading?

Since we are on the Glock forum, I will assume that you're talking pistol here. I currently use a lot of WSF powder, but if I had to choose one powder do it all; I would say HP-38/ WW 231 (same stuff) is the one powder that can handle all your needs.

I will be loading 9 mm and 45 to start and will probably add .223 soon. The shooting will be mostly target shooting, but I am hoping to do a few competitions in 2010.

Billy_Ray
12-30-2009, 21:39
+1 on WW231. Loads everything from .25acp to .44mag, just about the most universal powder around. I buy it in 8# kegs :cool:

Tom

Can you tell me why you chose WW231 over all the other powders? Also, if you were to want to try another powder how would you decide wihch one to try? Is it primarily burn rates/ease of metering/commonality across calibers or some other reason?

Thanks for the advice.

fredj338
12-30-2009, 21:41
+1 on WW231. Loads everything from .25acp to .44mag, just about the most universal powder around. I buy it in 8# kegs :cool:

Tom
Yes, universal choice for mousefarts in most calibers above the service rounds.:upeyes:
You need to define what you want your handloads to do. Punch paper, duplicate factory SD ammo, hunting, what? Then choose a powder that easily gives you the vel. level you want. W231 is a fine powder for target loads in just about any caliber, true enough, but when you want to make full power 40 or 357sig or any of the magnums, it just won't get you there safely.
For newbs, go w/ a medium burner like Unique, Universal or WSF. Yes, you will use a tiny bit more powder, big deal, powder is THE cheapest part of a reloads. The medium burners give you a broader load range, w/ lower pressure, especially for the high pressure rounds & the magnum rounds. As always, JMO.:wavey:

Kentucky Shooter
12-30-2009, 21:44
I will be loading 9 mm and 45 to start and will probably add .223 soon. The shooting will be mostly target shooting, but I am hoping to do a few competitions in 2010.

9MM and 45------unique, bullseye, Titegroup are some of my favorites.

.223-------for me, its hands down----Hodgdon 322.

Have fun--reloading is a great hobby in and of itself.

buckshotshorty
12-30-2009, 21:50
WW 231 is a faster burning powder, but it is not so fast that the pressures peak real quick. WW 231 gives a wider +- range than many other powders, thus giving you more flexibility. Additionally, it meters extremely well in most powder measures. It is unlikely that you would accidentally throw A double charge of ww 231 because it takes up quite a bit of space for a small amount.

223 will require a different kind of powder for rifles. The two that I mentioned I don't believe would work well in a rifle. I have not loaded for the 223, so I cannot recommend a powder.

.

Jim Watson
12-30-2009, 21:53
I load 9mm with HP38 and .38 Special with Win 231. (I still have some 231 bought before the amalgamation of the product lines, and it is not quite the same as my fresh HP38. Hodgon shows them identical now that they control the distribution of Winchester powders along with their own.)
I have loaded a lot of .45 ACP with the pair, too.
I think it/they is hard to go wrong with for loads above powderpuff and below magnum.

I load .223 with Varget but my emphasis is on heavy bullets for mid and long range target shooting. The varmint hunters like H335 because it is economical and meters well, saving time in volume loading.

AA#5
12-30-2009, 21:56
231 is great for range loads. I find AA#5 meters more consistenly through powder measures. Until you get more loading experience, I'd use a powder that fills 1/2 - 3/4 of the case so you would quickly notice a double charge. If you're loading 9mm, that won't be an issue since it's a small capacity case, but if you load 357 or 44, I'd use "Trail Boss" since it's designed to fill 3/4 of large cases.

shotgunred
12-31-2009, 00:10
Yes, universal choice for mousefarts in most calibers above the service rounds.:upeyes:
You need to define what you want your handloads to do. Punch paper, duplicate factory SD ammo, hunting, what? Then choose a powder that easily gives you the vel. level you want. W231 is a fine powder for target loads in just about any caliber, true enough, but when you want to make full power 40 or 357sig or any of the magnums, it just won't get you there safely.


I think solo 1000 is the new powder you have to have for mouse farts.You are just not in with the in crowd in competition if its not solo 1000 or tight group.:supergrin:

I am still flipping between power pistol, wst, wsf, 231and Universal. Hopefully at some point I will settle on one powder and buy a keg of it.

dougader
12-31-2009, 00:29
WSF would be a great starter powder for 9mm and 45 auto. I use a lot of WW 231 but like Fred says its more for target loads. I even think Universal is a touch on the fast side for full power rounds, and I have a keg of it. VV powders are great but harder to find and more $$. VV340 is great for 45 auto. VV 3N37 is great for 9mm, as is Ramshot Silhouette. But WSF is a great powder for both 9mm and 45 imo.

223 needs a slower file powder like AA2230 or 2460, TAC, WW748, H335, etc.

sean665
12-31-2009, 09:16
Personally for handgun loads I use alot of Unique and Bullseye, with the exception of the Elmer Keith .44 mag load which uses 2400. For my rifle loads it's IMR 4064, Imr 4895 and H380.

fredj338
12-31-2009, 10:17
I think solo 1000 is the new powder you have to have for mouse farts.You are just not in with the in crowd in competition if its not solo 1000 or tight group.:supergrin:

I am still flipping between power pistol, wst, wsf, 231and Universal. Hopefully at some point I will settle on one powder and buy a keg of it.
Yeah, I'm a quirky guy. When I do shoot competition, I use pretty much factory equiv. loads. I see little value in shooting mousefart loads & then trying to transition that to real life shooting in IDPA or IPSC. Pratice like you play I think is the term.:upeyes: Even for CAS, I can't shoot pure mouse fart loads, just doesn't feel like I am shooting, Might as well use a 22lr.:tongueout: Do I win a lot, no, do I win some, yep. Feels better too when yo ucan win w/ real ammo in your gun.
I like WST for lighter target loads in any of the service rounds. Unique & WSF more & more, for light & medium-hvy loads in the magnums. Then you need 2400, AA#9 or H110 for full house magnum loads. SO I could load all 11 calibers I load for w/ 3 powders & cover the entire velocity range.:supergrin:

YogiBearFan
12-31-2009, 11:09
I will be loading 9 mm and 45 to start and will probably add .223 soon. The shooting will be mostly target shooting, but I am hoping to do a few competitions in 2010.

There are 2 reloading manuals I use. Speer and Lee.

Speer for 90% of what I load, Lee has good data that matches their equipment.

For 9mm and 45acp, you will probably want to use different powders.

Lots of good data on both. How heavy a bullet are you looking to load with? 115gr for 124/125gr or going heavy with a 147gr?
Also, the type of brass you will be working with. Remington and Winchester are the most commonly reloaded. Starline brass is the best.

My suggestion would be to use Remington brass, PowerPistol powder, and 115gr plated bullets with small pistol (NOT MAGNUM) primers.

Start with the min load as per the powder manufacturers recommendations.


For 45acp, again, tons of good results have been documented.
200gr or 230gr? "ball" ammor or SWC?

Again, just a suggestion, use Remington or Winchester brass, W231 or Titegroup powder with a 230gr plated bullet and large pistol (NOT MAGNUM) primers.

For .223, I assume you are going to be shooting this from a 5.56 NATO chambered AR15, Mini-14, or AK.
Full length resize, then trim/chamfer the necks. I would recommend Remington or Winchester or LC brass (where you can find it) and stick with a bullet that your barrel is rated for.

For powder, TAC or W748 or H335 or AA2230 are going to be your best bet. Again, check with the powder manufacturers recommendations and work up the load. Small rifle primers should be sufficient. Remington 7 1/2 or Fed 205GM for "match" work. Otherwise, Wolf/Winchester/CCI primers work well enough for plinking.

There have been some really good solid recommendations already. I have found the most consistent results with these combinations.


Stay safe!!!

DoctaGlockta
12-31-2009, 11:50
I recently started loading both 45acp and 223 a few months ago. For 45acp I use Unique. For 223 I use H322 and have also ordered TAC but not used it yet. Good luck.

rg1
12-31-2009, 13:31
I recommend to study and compare reload data from bullet manufacturers, powder companies and others such as the Lyman manual. I'd look at the data in each and I tend to favor powder company data. As you see the data at the top of the lists are the fastest burning and the powders at the bottom of the list are the slowest recommended powders for the caliber and bullet. I eliminate the top 2 or 3 which are fastest, and eliminate the bottom couple powders which are slowest, and pick ones that are not slowest or fastest burning and also try to pick powders that are available locally at gun shops.
For 9MM and 45ACP I like Unique and AA#5. For .223 I like H335 for bullets up to 55 grains. For heavy match 69-80 grain .223 I shoot Reloder 15. There are other good choices. Like I said, I like to shoot powders available in stores nearby.

chris in va
12-31-2009, 13:39
I started reloading a few months ago and asked the same question.

Two pieces of good advice were given as a 'newbie'. One: Make sure the powder can't be double charged by accident. If that happens, it will overflow the case and you'll know something went wrong. Two: The charge grains need to have a large spread between min and max. Some powders have .5gr between the two and it can be very easy to overcharge a case with those.

I started with Universal on my 9mm, worked very well. 231 is also good for a 'newbie' like myself.

Colorado4Wheel
12-31-2009, 13:57
I started reloading a few months ago and asked the same question.

Two pieces of good advice were given as a 'newbie'. One: Make sure the powder can't be double charged by accident. If that happens, it will overflow the case and you'll know something went wrong. Two: The charge grains need to have a large spread between min and max. Some powders have .5gr between the two and it can be very easy to overcharge a case with those.

I started with Universal on my 9mm, worked very well. 231 is also good for a 'newbie' like myself.

Good choices. I would avoid the "Gamer Powders" to start with. So very careful of Solo1000, Titegroup or other equally as fast powders. You have a good list from this thread already.

http://www.leeprecision.com/html/instruct/index.html

Download and print page 3 (I think) that has the charge and volume of each powder. 9mm has a usefull CC of .74 and .45 has a useful cc of 1.14. You can look up the load data and cross reference that chart and get a idea what amoung of the case (below the bullet) will be filled. If you have Richard Lee's "Modern Reloading" you can just look at his reloading data and pick a powder that has a larger CC number. .45 is going to be real tough to see the powder in with some choices. Power Pistol is very bulky, as is Solo 1000, Unique, Universal. 231 is kinda in the middle. Burn rate will tell you how it will feel. Faster powders will feel softer in recoil. Slower powders will feel punchy. Solo1000 is a great fast powder, that is super bulky, but will NOT give max velocity. As a gaming powder for someone who is willing to find their own reloading data (brianenos.com) it's great. But it's very fast. To me the huge bulk of the powder makes up for this. It' fills the case to the bottom of the bullet nearly, so it's easy to see.

0-16
12-31-2009, 15:17
W231 and Unique are both good powders to begin with. Both work well for 9mm and 45

LoadedTech
12-31-2009, 16:39
I started reloading a few months ago also. I chose the 231 because its been around forever, not the fastest burner, and lots of data available for it. It seems to have good accuracy with my target rounds. Good luck!

Patrick Graham
12-31-2009, 16:50
Yet another vote for 231

coal
12-31-2009, 18:10
W231 and Unique are both good powders to begin with. Both work well for 9mm and 45

Good starting powders.

For 9mm and .45acp, I currently use Titegroup (FMJ) and Solo 1000 (lead).

TheLastBoyscout
01-02-2010, 17:54
Surprised no one uses HS6 ?
That is a great all around pistol powder for me.

Kentucky Shooter
01-03-2010, 16:47
There are 2 reloading manuals I use. Speer and Lee.

Speer for 90% of what I load, Lee has good data that matches their equipment.

I agree----the Speer manual is one of my favorites, as well as the Lyman. I would recommend anyone to give these a look.

Palouse
01-04-2010, 13:03
tagged...

jdavionic
01-05-2010, 20:01
I recieved for Christmas a new reloading press, reloading accessories and I built a sturdy bench for it, so I am almost ready to start reloading. I have read the ABCs of Reloading and studied one reloading manual (I have another on order). I have also been reading posts here for the last couple months. But I have not seen this addressed in any of the above sources...

So my question is which recipe/powder do you start with for a given caliber/bullet combination?

Thank you,
Billy Ray

Well let me first state that you are now officially a troll...according to the OP here :rofl:http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1166906

Sorry, I couldn't resist. First off, congrats for getting into reloading. For 9mm, I usually compete with a G34. My loads are 1.125 OAL, Montana Gold PHP 124 gr (lately), and 3.9 gr or 4.1 gr Titegroup (usually 4.1 gr). The 3.9 gr is a pretty light load and just barely makes the PF (power factor) for USPSA competition. If you want, I can PM you the chrono data on the 3.9 gr loads.

I've also reloaded 9mm with Hodgdon HS-6. With 124 gr HPs, I used 6.0 gr HS-6 with an OAL of 1.125.

For .223, I've been using H335. My loads for 55 gr FMJBT are 24.1 gr of H335 with an OAL of 2.210. My AR has a 16" chrome lined barrel with a 1:9 twist.

Also, you mentioned wanting to compete in GA. When you reach that point, send me a PM and let me know where you are specifically. I shoot USPSA matches and love them. It's a lot of fun and addictive. Take that first step and give it a try. You won't be sorry. Your shooting skill level will increase dramatically too.

Good luck and let me know if I can help.

RustyFN
01-05-2010, 21:01
So my question is which recipe/powder do you start with for a given caliber/bullet combination?

Thank you,
Billy Ray

Welcome to reloading. Unique will be a slower bruning powder but not as consistant in most powder measures. My advice would be to look at the middle range powders in the calibers you want to load, start at the starting load and work up to what is the best for your gun. If all you are given is a max load then reduce it by 10% and work it up. I'm willing to bet that you will find the best combination for you gun by working it up yourself rather than jumping around between all of the loads people give you.

Surprised no one uses HS6 ?

I have used it in 9mm and thought it worked very good. I didn't care for it in 45 auto.

Billy_Ray
01-07-2010, 20:41
Thank you everyone for your advice. I think that I will start with the 231 as suggested. I recieved my Lyman reloading manual yesterday and while they don't say that 231 is the most accurate powder they do recommend as one of the better powders both for 9 and 45.

I am going to start with some 115 grain FMJs at the low end and work up from there.

I will let you know how my first reloads fire.

Thanks again,
Billy Ray

PBKing
01-08-2010, 05:39
Surprised no one uses HS6 ?
That is a great all around pistol powder for me.
Nothing wrong with HS-6 at all.
+1 on 231 for a first powder

Myke_Hart
01-08-2010, 05:59
Surprised no one uses HS6 ?
That is a great all around pistol powder for me.

I have a lot of trouble with unburnt powder in lighter loads. It cleans up on the upper end of things, and the Extreme spread starts to get better. I just logged a large group of 9mm shots last night with HS6 and the numbers were horrible. The extreme spread was over 50. No shot to shot consistancy. I also noted that I was being hit in the face with unburnt powder. I might try magnum primers on those loads to see if it changes things.

On another note W231 logged from the same day and gun looks promising.
Titegroup looked good too.

So so far I am only having good luck with 45 and HS6. But I still try it on others to see if I'm missing anything.

I would also have to say W231 is a good all around powder.

Bob2223
01-08-2010, 08:28
Surprised no one uses HS6 ?
That is a great all around pistol powder for me.

Nothing wrong with HS-6 at all.
+1 on 231 for a first powder

I have a lot of trouble with unburnt powder in lighter loads. It cleans up on the upper end of things, and the Extreme spread starts to get better. I just logged a large group of 9mm shots last night with HS6 and the numbers were horrible. The extreme spread was over 50. No shot to shot consistancy. I also noted that I was being hit in the face with unburnt powder. I might try magnum primers on those loads to see if it changes things.

On another note W231 logged from the same day and gun looks promising.
Titegroup looked good too.

So so far I am only having good luck with 45 and HS6. But I still try it on others to see if I'm missing anything.

I would also have to say W231 is a good all around powder.

I've burnt quite a bit of HS6 in 40 with good results.

231 has always been the main powder for my 45 loads but recently I've been using WST and Unique with cast boolets.

Bob

skyugo
01-10-2010, 13:28
I will be loading 9 mm and 45 to start and will probably add .223 soon. The shooting will be mostly target shooting, but I am hoping to do a few competitions in 2010.

ramshot TAC is great stuff for 223. clean, measures easily, accurate, inexpensive.

i'm using unique for 9mm right now. it's not bad, but it's little round flake things, instead of tiny spheres, so it doesn't measure quite as nicely. though i will say accuracy has been good (2.5" group at 50 feet, standing, 5 shots, would be 1.5 but i had a flyer..) and it's pretty clean. definitely cleaner than most cheap factory ammo.

RustyFN
01-10-2010, 15:23
but recently I've been using WST

Bob I just bought a pound of WST at the recommendation of Fred. I haven't had a chance to load any yet but am looking forward to working some loads up in 45 auto and 9mm.

DWARREN123
01-10-2010, 15:25
I picked my caliber (40 S&W) and looked at powder company web sites for a powder which gave good FPS with lower chamber pressures.
I picked Hodgdon's Longshot as my powder. I exprimented with brass and primers and found R-P brass then Winchester brass worked for me. As for primers it really came down to what was available and mostly local it was Magtech which has worked well.
I am happy with my choices but have tried Winchester Auto Comp for 165gr bullets and it also works well for these.
There are so many choices that you really need to decide what you want and start from there.
Are your reloads going to be range/plinking, hunting or SD?

Bob2223
01-10-2010, 19:29
Bob I just bought a pound of WST at the recommendation of Fred. I haven't had a chance to load any yet but am looking forward to working some loads up in 45 auto and 9mm.

I have used 231 in 45 for years, tried a few others but for target shooting 231 always seemed to work well and was always available.
I'm really liking the WST with the cast 200gn SWC, I think its my go to propellant for 45 target loads now? Meters great burns clean and is pretty accurate in my old 45. I'm wanting to try the WSF for the 40's as soon as the local shop gets a lb in stock.
Yep old Fred knows his stuff!


Bob

RustyFN
01-10-2010, 20:21
I'm really liking the WST with the cast 200gn SWC,

That's good to hear. I'll be loading it under some home cast 200 grain SWC.

BEA
01-14-2010, 22:55
In 9mm and 45 auto, I have always had good luck with Bullseye and Unique. In the 223, RL 10x works very well with the light to midrange bullets and RL 15 for the heavy bullets is outstanding.

fredj338
01-15-2010, 02:28
I have used 231 in 45 for years, tried a few others but for target shooting 231 always seemed to work well and was always available.
I'm really liking the WST with the cast 200gn SWC, I think its my go to propellant for 45 target loads now? Meters great burns clean and is pretty accurate in my old 45. I'm wanting to try the WSF for the 40's as soon as the local shop gets a lb in stock.
Yep old Fred knows his stuff!


Bob
Hey, I'm not that old! Jack is old, I'm just "mature".:rofl: Yep, give the WSF a try for the 40, best powder I have used yet in that cartridge. WST works, but I get better accuracy w/ less pressure using WSF. In the 45, WST is just magic.:supergrin: If you like BE, you'll love WST. If you like Unique, you'll love WSF. When I get around to shooting up all my other bits & pieces of pwoder, I'll probably lay in an 8# of each, some Longshot for the 357sig & 10mm & 2400 for the magnums & I am set.

Maninmirror
01-15-2010, 10:52
Billy_Ray (http://glocktalk.com/forums/member.php?u=82129)

I am sure this sounds like a broken Record : What your hoping to accomplish is an accurate load that works in your guns with the bullets primers and powders you chose.

Buy a Chronograph it will save you hours of time. Plus it will make your journey getting there safer.

You can buy a nice one for 100.00 and Top of the line for 200.00

1006
01-16-2010, 16:47
For pistols: Unique is all you need to get started. There is a ton of DATA for it, it takes up a fair amount of room in the case, it is predictable, and it is so dirty that you will be forced to clean your gun every once in a while.

Have fun with it.

tyger006
01-18-2010, 22:12
I would add a +1 to TAC in the .223.

Have had great success with HS-6 for 9mm heavier loads.

I think Silhouette would be a good choice for your pistol needs as well.

Be safe!
Tyger

BossMaverick
01-20-2010, 08:34
I've been away from Glocktalk for about 6 months to a year. I'm very pleased to see Solo 1000 is being suggested more and more. Seems like hardly anyone would suggest it in the past. Solo is the first powder I got stuck on for 45acp instead of always experimenting pound by pound.

I know you already bought some powder but here are my suggestions:
-Solo 1000 for light to medium handgun loads. Good for cowboy loads too since it's so bulky (think of it as a poor man's Trailboss powder for cowboy guns). It burns very very clean, it's accurate, it's cheap, and it doesn't seem to be as sensitive to load changes as Clays (for me at least).
-Accurate #5 for an everything handgun powder (mainly for medium to full power loads). It was the first powder I bought when I first started reloading. I like it many times better then Unique. #5 burns so much cleaner then Unique (think of a propane grill versus charcoal grill). I tried other things for an universal powder but nothing seemed to work as good for me as #5.
-Tac for .223. There might be a better powder for bench rest accuracy but for making rounds in volume Tac meters good, burns good, it's accurate, and it's cheap (realitively speaking). Varget is decent too but I found it fills 223 cases pretty much to the brim, it doesn't pour into the small 223 mouths reliably, and it costs a little more.

Rinspeed
01-21-2010, 13:14
W231 and Unique are both great to start with.

Billy_Ray
01-24-2010, 21:26
Thank you everyone for your help so far. I was planning to use Winchester 231, but I could not find any locally and did not want to pay the hazmat fee. So after reading your comments and reviewing the reloading manuals I decided to go with HS-6. So I have 124 grain FMJ bullets from Montana Gold, I found some Wolf primers and have 1 lb of HS-6 and am looking to make up my first rounds. So now I have 2 questions:

1. How much powder should I start with? The Hodgdon website says to start with 6.4 and work up to 6.8 grains of HS-6 for a 125 FMJ while the Speer reloading manual says to start with 6.0 and work up to 6.6 grains for their 124 grain TMJ. (The Lyman reloading manual only has data for 125 grain JHP) So how much powder to start with and at what OAL?

2. How should I develop a load without a chronographer? (I know they are cheap, but I can't swing one right now.) Do you usually add .1 or .3 grains from the starting load and check for pressure signs? Or is there another method. BTW I was planning to run 10 rounds first and make sure the action cycles and it feeds properly and check for accuracy.

Thank you again for your help,
Billy Ray

Colorado4Wheel
01-25-2010, 08:45
Incomplete load data like you just listed is worthless to discuss. List the complete recipe. Otherwise any advice is just a vague as the data you listed.

Billy_Ray
01-25-2010, 08:52
Incomplete load data like you just listed is worthless to discuss. List the complete recipe. Otherwise any advice is just a vague as the data you listed.

From Hodgdon website:
125 GR. SIE FMJ Hodgdon HS-6 .355" 1.090" 6.4 1131 25,600 CUP 6.8 1169 27,100 CUP

I don't have the Speer information handy.

tyger006
01-25-2010, 11:25
Well, the short answer is always start with the data that uses a lower charge when in doubt.

While OAL does factor in, The thing that you need to think about is case capacity. If your bullet design is similar enough that the length of the bullet is the same as the one featured in the book recipe, then you are usually good to go.

If your bullets are longer than the ones in the published book recipe(assuming they are both the same weight), then you need to aproach the OAL with caution and thought. So if you are loading a long rather pointy bullet design, and the listed data is for a short flat HP for example, then it would be a bad idea to bring your OAL down to the same as the book. This would mean that the base of your bullet is deeper in the case than the published load, decreasing usable case capacity, and for a given powder charge, increasing pressure.

Just something to think about. Most published loads are near the max OAL anyway, but it could make a difference.

Good luck!

Tyger

Colorado4Wheel
01-25-2010, 11:31
From Hodgdon website:
125 GR. SIE FMJ Hodgdon HS-6 .355" 1.090" 6.4 1131 25,600 CUP 6.8 1169 27,100 CUP

I don't have the Speer information handy.

So when you get the other info, compare the OAL and FPS, etc of the two sources. Make your choice based on that data. I always try to load a good bit longer then they say in the manual. For instance I load that bullet (MG 124gr FMJ) at 1.130 and it works fine. So if you go longer in OAL, use the min data to start with you should be fine. Then I load batch's of 10, shoot them, check each batch for pressure signs. I load them in .2 gr increments. Mark the lowest with 1 slash of a marker, 2 slashes for the next one up and no slash for the highest. Shoot them, look at the cases carefully before moving on. I ussually find that the lowest starting loads do not cycle my gun weak hand reliable. Thats ussually a good sign that you are at a starting load with a autopistol. Work it up from there.

fredj338
01-25-2010, 14:02
So when you get the other info, compare the OAL and FPS, etc of the two sources. Make your choice based on that data. I always try to load a good bit longer then they say in the manual. For instance I load that bullet (MG 124gr FMJ) at 1.130 and it works fine. So if you go longer in OAL, use the min data to start with you should be fine. Then I load batch's of 10, shoot them, check each batch for pressure signs. I load them in .2 gr increments. Mark the lowest with 1 slash of a marker, 2 slashes for the next one up and no slash for the highest. Shoot them, look at the cases carefully before moving on. I ussually find that the lowest starting loads do not cycle my gun weak hand reliable. Thats ussually a good sign that you are at a starting load with a autopistol. Work it up from there.
Pretty much how I approach a new powder/bullet combo except I average data form three source. Either use starting data + 0.1gr & work up in 0.1gr increments or go avg. middle data & go up 0.1gr & down 0.1gr. Some starting data just won't be reliable in all semiautos. Middle data often give a perfect result & going up & down 0.1gr can fine tune for best load. Saves time & money ( I have to drive 3hrs to shoot). OAL is extremely important, especially in high pressure rounds. Match the profile of the bullet you are loading w/ the data present. Load as long as YOU pistol will allow, gives you a small margin of error. You can fine tune the load by seating a bit deeper if need be. A chrono is very useful, but using this method, you can make safe, accurate ammo.