after 15 years of reloading I finally had a [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : after 15 years of reloading I finally had a


Wash-ar15
01-07-2010, 18:51
primer detonate on me. So i was loading some 45 on my pro 1k. primers were Win LP. was on the priming stroke and "pop". Check my self and did not see any blood. Godd thing i make it a habit of wearing safety glasses everytime i reload.

First time this has happened in close to 15 years of reloading

Time to get a new primer feed.

http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/medium/lee_003.jpg

http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/medium/lee_001.jpg

http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/medium/lee_004.jpg

Adjuster
01-07-2010, 19:03
Wow! Why are primers so powerful? Seems like it would take very little spark for lack of a better word to set off the powder in a cartridge.

GioaJack
01-07-2010, 19:25
Wash:

There are only two kinds of loaders... those who have had primers detonate and those who are going to have primers detonate.

Glade you came out unscathed... except for the pucker factor of course.

Jack

Singlestack Wonder
01-07-2010, 19:29
Demonstrates why Lee reloading machines are dangerous. Only plastic protecting the operator. Lesson learned. Get a Dillon and put steel between you and the next primer detonation.

Hydraulicman
01-07-2010, 19:35
looks like you've got some miles on that lee:supergrin:

Glad your ok.

DEADLYACCURATE
01-07-2010, 19:37
Demonstrates why Lee reloading machines are dangerous. Only plastic protecting the operator. Lesson learned. Get a Dillon and put steel between you and the next primer detonation.

http://archvillain.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/not-this-********** :yawn:

Wash-ar15
01-07-2010, 19:38
looks like you've got some miles on that lee:supergrin:

Glad your ok.

Actually it only 9 months old. it seems to have detonated just the 1 primer. The rest were around the table,but missing the anvils for some reason.

unclebob
01-07-2010, 19:44
Wow! Why are primers so powerful? Seems like it would take very little spark for lack of a better word to set off the powder in a cartridge.

Have you ever tryed too burn some smokeless powder. Try it and you well see how hard it is light it And no it is not going to explode. It well only burn.
I would say you are very lucky that the hole primer tray did not go also.

Wash-ar15
01-07-2010, 19:49
Have you ever tryed too burn some smokeless powder. Try it and you well see how hard it is light it And no it is not going to explode. It well only burn.
I would say you are very lucky that the hole primer tray did not go also.

here is a question. Since lee set the primers side by side instead of stacking them in tubes like others,I would think that side impact would be less likely to set them off than stacking them on top of each other like in tubes.

Am i wrong?

BK63
01-07-2010, 19:49
When I'm loading I'm always watching to make sure there is no dirt or anything under where that primer is sitting before it gets seated in the shell. Many times I stop and take a brush and clean something out of there that drops in during reloading. If the surface the primer is on is flat I can't see why it would go off.

GioaJack
01-07-2010, 19:53
here is a question. Since lee set the primers side by side instead of stacking them in tubes like others,I would think that side impact would be less likely to set them off than stacking them on top of each other like in tubes.

Am i wrong?


No, you're not wrong at all. Stacked primers are very similar to a roman candle, one detonation after another. With primers the detonation of the lowest primer detonates the next and so on and so on. Obviously it all happens in a millisecond.

Jack

crash09
01-07-2010, 19:57
No, you're not wrong at all. Stacked primers are very similar to a roman candle, one detonation after another. With primers the detonation of the lowest primer detonates the next and so on and so on. Obviously it all happens in a millisecond.

Jack

:wow: Never thought about that. Ever had a stack go off?

Bob2223
01-07-2010, 20:08
:wow: Never thought about that. Ever had a stack go off?

http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1151812

Yep Dillon :whistling:

GioaJack
01-07-2010, 20:12
:wow: Never thought about that. Ever had a stack go off?


Almost took my face off... stuck in the ceiling.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_4096.jpg?t=1262916629

Jack

unclebob
01-07-2010, 20:20
No, you're not wrong at all. Stacked primers are very similar to a roman candle, one detonation after another. With primers the detonation of the lowest primer detonates the next and so on and so on. Obviously it all happens in a millisecond.

Jack

It does not make any difference if the primers are stacked, or side-by-side. If you set one off you may or may not set the rest of them off. It is called sympathetic detention. Even with the Dillon 650 where there is a space between the primers on the disk you can set all of the primers off in the disk and up the primer tube. I have set off one primer two or three times and did not destroy anything. A friend of mine has set off all the primers a couple of times. That does destroy a couple of parts. I was there when he set off his first one and it sounded like one primer going off. Once I got the fell for the primers going in on the 650 I have not set any off for years now. It was a learning curve from the 550.

Bob2223
01-07-2010, 20:23
Almost took my face off... stuck in the ceiling.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_4096.jpg?t=1262916629

Jack


Did a double take on your plaque thought it said 1934 at first !


Bob

unclebob
01-07-2010, 20:24
Almost took my face off... stuck in the ceiling.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_4096.jpg?t=1262916629

Jack

That is one of the reasons why I like the Dillon press and loading standing, with the press high enough where Iím no where near the top of that primer magazine.

GioaJack
01-07-2010, 20:26
Did a double take on your plaque thought it said 1934 at first !


Bob


Shouldn't you be shoveling snow, or slaughtering goats instead of showing disrespect to your elders? :whistling:

Jack

LoadedTech
01-07-2010, 20:38
Damn Geo, I was 2y/o then.
Edit, 1year 4 months.

unclebob
01-07-2010, 20:39
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1151812

Yep Dillon :whistling:

If you think that cannot happen too your precious Hornady. I have land on the moon too sell you.

GioaJack
01-07-2010, 20:45
If you think that cannot happen too your precious Hornady. I have land on the moon too sell you.


I'd like some next to a crater please... I'm gonna fill it with water, I've always wanted beach front property.

I hope the covenants limit people from Indiana to the dark side of the moon... need to protect property values don't ya know. :supergrin:

Jack

DEADLYACCURATE
01-07-2010, 21:11
Did a double take on your plaque thought it said 1934 at first !


Bob

:rofl: Wouldn't be surprised

dougader
01-07-2010, 23:11
Shouldn't you be shoveling snow, or slaughtering goats instead of showing disrespect to your elders? :whistling:

Jack

You're all right, Jack. :)

kcbrown
01-07-2010, 23:24
The Pro 1000, the Dillons (except for the 1050), and the Hornady LNL all prime by pressing forward on the handle, if I'm not mistaken. This lets you feel the primer go into the pocket and bottom out.

For those of you who have detonated primers on these presses, did you feel anything different before the primer went off? How fast are you priming?

When I'm running the press, it takes me about a half second to complete the priming operation alone. I can feel the primer go into the pocket and I can feel it seat, and if I don't feel it doing either one when I expect to I stop right then and there. I know from experience how much force it takes to normally seat the primer and I don't use any more than that, so if the primer is reluctant to seat I will stop and investigate rather than push it. As a result, I've discovered brass with crimped pockets and occasionally a piece of brass with the old primer still in it. The downside is that I get perhaps 300 to 400 rounds an hour out of my 650, but I'll take that over a primer detonation event anytime.

When you guys got primer detonations, did they occur while you were operating the press the way I describe? Is the method I use to operate the press sufficient to prevent the possibility of primer detonation?

Bones507
01-08-2010, 02:12
Wash:

There are only two kinds of loaders... those who have had primers detonate and those who are going to have primers detonate.


Jack

Just what i wanted to hear, words of encouragement. lol

dudel
01-08-2010, 04:18
Demonstrates why Lee reloading machines are dangerous. Only plastic protecting the operator. Lesson learned. Get a Dillon and put steel between you and the next primer detonation.

Or a Hornady. My old Hornady Pro-jector AP had a steel tube around the primer feeder. Frankly that's on feature that I wish Lee hadn't cheaped out on. THere's alot of primers being jostled around on the Lee primer systems.

unclebob
01-08-2010, 08:25
I'd like some next to a crater please... I'm gonna fill it with water, I've always wanted beach front property.

I hope the covenants limit people from Indiana to the dark side of the moon... need to protect property values don't ya know. :supergrin:

Jack

Water front property, I hope you realize that well cost you more.:supergrin:

coachg
01-08-2010, 08:49
I had my first a couple of weeks ago on my LoadMaster. One of the Speer 45 ACP cases with the small primer pocket snuck into my case feeder and it went POP! Nothing was damaged but it scared the #$%^ out of me.

I was a little jumpy for the next few rounds.

dudel
01-08-2010, 09:02
here is a question. Since lee set the primers side by side instead of stacking them in tubes like others,I would think that side impact would be less likely to set them off than stacking them on top of each other like in tubes.

Am i wrong?
When they go off in a stack, you think the rest of the primers just hang around waiting to go off?

dudel
01-08-2010, 09:06
Almost took my face off... stuck in the ceiling.



Jack

Jack,

That looks like it came off a Hornady (brass end). The Horndy has a stout steel tube around the primer tube (the one the actually has the primers in it). I'm guessing that tube bulged after it left the safety tube, on it's way to the ceiling. Must have been rough getting your shorts unpuckered.

unclebob
01-08-2010, 09:06
The Pro 1000, the Dillons (except for the 1050), and the Hornady LNL all prime by pressing forward on the handle, if I'm not mistaken. This lets you feel the primer go into the pocket and bottom out.

For those of you who have detonated primers on these presses, did you feel anything different before the primer went off? How fast are you priming?

When I'm running the press, it takes me about a half second to complete the priming operation alone. I can feel the primer go into the pocket and I can feel it seat, and if I don't feel it doing either one when I expect to I stop right then and there. I know from experience how much force it takes to normally seat the primer and I don't use any more than that, so if the primer is reluctant to seat I will stop and investigate rather than push it. As a result, I've discovered brass with crimped pockets and occasionally a piece of brass with the old primer still in it. The downside is that I get perhaps 300 to 400 rounds an hour out of my 650, but I'll take that over a primer detonation event anytime.

When you guys got primer detonations, did they occur while you were operating the press the way I describe? Is the method I use to operate the press sufficient to prevent the possibility of primer detonation?
Yes now I operate the press as you describe now. When I first got the 650 press I was using the same fell as I did with the 550. I soon learned that, that did not work. The guy that has had the mass primers going off does slam the primers home. It has been too many years ago too tell you how I was loading at the time, and why I had the primer go off. As long as you only set off one it is no big deal, at least for me it is not. Too many years of loading 500, 750 & 3000 lbs bombs on airplanes. Also being shot at with every thing from a BB gun too a SAM missile.
The Dillon 1050 and the Lee load Master prime on up stroke. I believe on those pressesís you cannot fell the primers being seated.
I would be lying if I told you that the way you load that you cannot set off a primer. Yes you have less of a chance. But it still can happen. That is why you should always wear safety glassís when loading. I also like too load standing where my press is high enough where when Iím loading or fill the primer magazine the top the of primer magazine is above my head. I also stand too the left of the press, so that Iím somewhat protected buy the press column in front and by the powder measure on top. Also I can if possible, visual check the powder level in the case at station 3 and also 4 before adding a bullet.

unclebob
01-08-2010, 09:21
When they go off in a stack, you think the rest of the primers just hang around waiting to go off?

An easy way too look at it is. Lets say you have 5 sticks of dynamite that you are going to set off. You can put them in a bundle or you put them on top of one another like in a drilled hole. You still only use one fuse too set them all off. Setting off the primers works the same way. The blast from the one that has the fuse sets the rest of them off. If they are in a hole the first one goes off, it sets off the next one and that one sets off the next one. This all happens in millionths of a second.

dudel
01-08-2010, 09:41
Total agreement Bob. They will go off in a stack or in a tray. My downside with the Lee device, is that there is no metal protection there.

My comment was actually meant for the Lee tray. Those primers don't just sit there while one goes off next to it. Sort of a chain reaction because the pressure of one going off is enough to set off others.

OP was very lucky.

Don
An easy way too look at it is. Lets say you have 5 sticks of dynamite that you are going to set off. You can put them in a bundle or you put them on top of one another like in a drilled hole. You still only use one fuse too set them all off. Setting off the primers works the same way. The blast from the one that has the fuse sets the rest of them off. If they are in a hole the first one goes off, it sets off the next one and that one sets off the next one. This all happens in millionths of a second.

bob_fuller
01-08-2010, 09:46
Damn Geo, I was 2y/o then.
Edit, 1year 4 months.


my dad was a freshman in high school that year

LoadedTech
01-08-2010, 10:02
I was thinking about this last night, I have the loadmaster, it brings up one primer on top the pin to seat into case. If for some reason the case were out of spec causing the primer to pop, the blast should travel upward, and that primer should be at least 1/4" above rest of the primers. I wouldn't think it would detonate the rest of them on mine.
Not to hijack, but what's the deal with federal primers and lee loaders, are they more prone to pop? Is it certain loaders or all lee loaders?

Patrick Graham
01-08-2010, 10:03
I had one go off as I rammed it home and seated it with a Rock Chucker about 25 years ago. When it happened the first thing I realized was that I was looking right down the primer tube. That's the day I ordered my first Lee Auto Prime.

Colorado4Wheel
01-08-2010, 10:08
Demonstrates why Lee reloading machines are dangerous. Only plastic protecting the operator. Lesson learned. Get a Dillon and put steel between you and the next primer detonation.

Actually, the plastic would become the projectile in the wrong situation. At least on the LM they give you a "Blast Sheild" as a option. I think it should be standard, but it is cheap enough.

GioaJack
01-08-2010, 11:16
Jack,

That looks like it came off a Hornady (brass end). The Horndy has a stout steel tube around the primer tube (the one the actually has the primers in it). I'm guessing that tube bulged after it left the safety tube, on it's way to the ceiling. Must have been rough getting your shorts unpuckered.



Don:

Actually that was from a C-H in-line progressive loader... other than Star, it was pretty much the first shot at a true progressive. I got it while I was policing in Miami and loading for two gun shops and a bunch of other cops and Eastern airline pilots in my spare time.

Those were the days of every other flight being hijacked to Cuba and quite a few pilots were learning how to shoot and carrying snubbies in their map cases.

The only thing that ever gave me more trouble than that C-H were my ex-wives. It was the biggest POS ever invented. The primer slide was spring activated and would stick on a regular basis. That was before the days of toll free numbers so after 1 or 2 long distance calls to the factory without the problem being resolved you pretty much had to figure out a fix.

When the slide would stick the usual fix was to pull back the brass slide with your fingers and let the spring tension snap it forward, strip off the primer at the bottom of the stack and seat it in the in-line shell plate. As you can see, the results were not always desirable.

I was standing at the time this happened and the tube flew by the front of my face... ended up with tiny little pieces of shrapnel all over my face with spots of blood everywhere. Ex-wife number was hysterical... that turned out to be one of my fondest memories with her.

Shortly after that I concentrated on working extra off-duty jobs until I made enough to buy two Star loaders, one .38 and one in .45.

They worked like champs but very complicated machines compared to Dillon or Hornady. Sold them about 15-18 years ago for more than I paid for 'em.

Jack

unclebob
01-08-2010, 11:17
I was thinking about this last night, I have the loadmaster, it brings up one primer on top the pin to seat into case. If for some reason the case were out of spec causing the primer to pop, the blast should travel upward, and that primer should be at least 1/4" above rest of the primers. I wouldn't think it would detonate the rest of them on mine.
Not to hijack, but what's the deal with federal primers and lee loaders, are they more prone to pop? Is it certain loaders or all lee loaders?

Look at the picture on page 82 of the Lee reloading manual. Just remember if for some reason those plastic parts end up in your body. They do not show up on x-rays.
Federal primers are just a lot easier too set off. It all depends where the primer goes off. If for some reason the primer is not in the primer pocket when it goes off. ľĒ is not far enough.

Bones507
01-08-2010, 12:19
I use the tubes on the rock chucker, i was thinking about getting some metal pipes or something along those lines to put over the tubes while im priming, thinking being in case the tube goes off the pipe will contain the blast more than the aluminum tube.
Anyone have a thoughts on this ? Im just kicking it around for ideas.

Wash-ar15
01-08-2010, 12:55
I got my first pro 1k in the early 90's. loaded thousand of 9mm without any mishaps. got a Lm a few years ago and loaded thousands of 9mm and 40sw without and primers going off. upside down primers and no primers at all,yes.

After loading so many,I have gotten a feel for the primer seating. But it really depends on the brass. Some are tighter and soem are looser. Some slide in smoothly and some pop in.

On the det,it did not feel and diffrent than a tight primer pocket. the plastic flew sideways and not straight up. nothing hit my glasses. Just a pop .

With so many reloading machine out there,i think these dets are quite rare,given the amounts loaded.

jbremount
01-08-2010, 13:28
Demonstrates why Lee reloading machines are dangerous. Only plastic protecting the operator. Lesson learned. Get a Dillon and put steel between you and the next primer detonation.



I think so also, I don't think that would have happen with a Dillon. Have anyone heard of a Dillon doing this? That could have been a lot worse with all those parts flying around. I think you were quite lucky myself.

Buy yourself a Dillon and don't look back.

GioaJack
01-08-2010, 13:33
I think so also, I don't think that would have happen with a Dillon. Have anyone heard of a Dillon doing this? That could have been a lot worse with all those parts flying around. I think you were quite lucky myself.

Buy yourself a Dillon and don't look back.


Check out the link that bob2223 posted... the machine that can't hurt you isn't born yet and its mother is dead.

Some designs may be safer than others but none are totally safe. When you play a potentially dangerous game someone will eventually get hurt.

Jack

dudel
01-08-2010, 13:54
I think so also, I don't think that would have happen with a Dillon. Have anyone heard of a Dillon doing this? That could have been a lot worse with all those parts flying around. I think you were quite lucky myself.

Buy yourself a Dillon and don't look back.

Yes it can happen on a Dillon. That's exactly why they put the protective tube over the primer feed tube. Hornady does the same.

A prior member showed the results (with pics) of it happening on their 1050 not that long ago.

jbremount
01-08-2010, 14:26
Yes it can happen on a Dillon. That's exactly why they put the protective tube over the primer feed tube. Hornady does the same.

A prior member showed the results (with pics) of it happening on their 1050 not that long ago.

Why I like the Dillon 550b. Wasn't he adjusting the primer depth? You don't adjust the primer depth with the 550b. It's also not auto indexing. You move the shell holder into alignment and press the single primer to the correct depth manually. You can actually feel the primer move into alignment with the cartidge, go in and bottom out.

WiskyT
01-08-2010, 15:00
It's a primer, not a pound of RDX. Safety glasses will stop any plastic parts that come flying at you. I actually feel better about having week plastic parts as misiles than steel. A loose plastic tray will do a lot less to channel the energy, unlike a metal tube with a rupture. I never had one go.

I hang my safety glasses on my press so I have to take them off the press to load. Otherwise I forget.

When we were young and dumb, we used to set them off with a hammer on the concrete floor.

norton
01-08-2010, 15:08
Shouldn't you be shoveling snow, or slaughtering goats instead of showing disrespect to your elders? :whistling:

Jack

Jack
In Hoosier land we are so talented we slaughter goats, shovel snow and post on G.T at the same time:supergrin:

unclebob
01-08-2010, 16:18
It's a primer, not a pound of RDX. Safety glasses will stop any plastic parts that come flying at you. I actually feel better about having week plastic parts as misiles than steel. A loose plastic tray will do a lot less to channel the energy, unlike a metal tube with a rupture. I never had one go.

I hang my safety glasses on my press so I have to take them off the press to load. Otherwise I forget.

When we were young and dumb, we used to set them off with a hammer on the concrete floor.

Look at post 1 that is just one primer going off now look at post 14 that is more than one primer going off. On the Dillon and Hornady that tube you see in the #14 post is inside of another steel tube. When I was at my friendís house when he set of almost 100 primers. The plastic primer follower rod went up and hit the ceiling when over my head and went about 15 feet and bounced off the side of the garage door/ The primer warning system went over his head and landed about 15 from the press. There was a hole in the ceiling where the rod first hit I donít remember if any of the primer came out of the tube or not. You are right it is not a pound of your RDX. But it still can do damage. With your plastic primer filler not only do you have plastic parts flying around but primers. A friend of mine who tried too deprime a live primer in his hand and it went off. Who too this day still has a primer in his hand. He choreographed a primer. It travels at around 700 too 800 feet per second.
So if you thank that plastic parts and primers flying around is safer than an aluminum tube inside a steel tube.Go for it. I spent too many years around explosives too know better.

WiskyT
01-08-2010, 16:57
Look at post 1 that is just one primer going off now look at post 14 that is more than one primer going off. On the Dillon and Hornady that tube you see in the #14 post is inside of another steel tube. When I was at my friendís house when he set of almost 100 primers. The plastic primer follower rod went up and hit the ceiling when over my head and went about 15 feet and bounced off the side of the garage door/ The primer warning system went over his head and landed about 15 from the press. There was a hole in the ceiling where the rod first hit I donít remember if any of the primer came out of the tube or not. You are right it is not a pound of your RDX. But it still can do damage. With your plastic primer filler not only do you have plastic parts flying around but primers. A friend of mine who tried too deprime a live primer in his hand and it went off. Who too this day still has a primer in his hand. He choreographed a primer. It travels at around 700 too 800 feet per second.
So if you thank that plastic parts and primers flying around is safer than an aluminum tube inside a steel tube.Go for it. I spent too many years around explosives too know better.

Okay, so if you had to be in proximity to a small explosive charge, you would rather that charge be contained in a steel pipe that will rupture, than in a plastic tray that will rupture.

How did your friend chronograph a primer?

unclebob
01-08-2010, 17:14
Okay, so if you had to be in proximity to a small explosive charge, you would rather that charge be contained in a steel pipe that will rupture, than in a plastic tray that will rupture.

How did your friend chronograph a primer?

No the second steel tube contains the explosion too only go upwards and downwards and not sideways. The Dillon and Hornady press have two tubes one of aluminum that the primers are in and another steel tube on the outside of that tube. The second tube will not rupture.
He put a primer in a case. Held the case with pliers and put a torch to the case in front of the chronograph.

IndyGunFreak
01-08-2010, 17:17
Okay, so if you had to be in proximity to a small explosive charge, you would rather that charge be contained in a steel pipe that will rupture, than in a plastic tray that will rupture.

How did your friend chronograph a primer?

I've never had a primer detonate(knock on wood).. but from what I've seen of Dillon and LNL primer detonations, the primer shield hasn't actually "ruptured".. It might split, but I've yet to see one "blow up" the way the plastic Lee would... I think the main job of the primer shield, is to direct the explosion up, and keep it from hitting the user.

IGF

WiskyT
01-08-2010, 17:48
Got it, blast shield in the form of a tube that stacks the primers on top of each other as opposed to laying them out side by side in a loose container. I'll just make sure I wear my safety glasses when I use my Lee, lawn darts, and click-clacks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMwV62qwoGY&feature=related

Colorado4Wheel
01-08-2010, 18:51
I think so also, I don't think that would have happen with a Dillon. Have anyone heard of a Dillon doing this? That could have been a lot worse with all those parts flying around. I think you were quite lucky myself.

Buy yourself a Dillon and don't look back.

650's have been known to blow primers in the little circle thing under the shellplate. They then can string it all the way up into the primer tube.


Okay, so if you had to be in proximity to a small explosive charge, you would rather that charge be contained in a steel pipe that will rupture, than in a plastic tray that will rupture.



The Dillon and I would assume Hornady tube while on the press is going to contain the blast and send it too the cealing. It will NOT go past a 1/2 sheet of drywall and if by some chance it did would NEVER go through the subfloor above it.

dudel
01-09-2010, 05:55
Okay, so if you had to be in proximity to a small explosive charge, you would rather that charge be contained in a steel pipe that will rupture, than in a plastic tray that will rupture.

The steel tube on the Dillon and Hornady do not contain the blast as much as the redirect the blast. The blast instead of spreading pieces/parts all over the place tends to direct it upwards away from the operator (unless you're standing with your head above the level of the tube).

Sort of the difference between standing next to a stick of explosives vs standing next to a cannon.

IndyGunFreak
01-09-2010, 06:47
Sort of the difference between standing next to a stick of explosives vs standing next to a cannon.

Good analogy.. :thumbsup:

IGF

repoman1984
01-09-2010, 07:09
I have been considering getting into reloading for match grade .223, How do you guys feel about hand priming? am I still facing the same odds of a primer detonation?

WiskyT
01-09-2010, 08:21
For anybody who hasn't done this, prime an empty case and fire it in a gun. There will be no mushroom cloud over your house. Wear safety glasses, pay attention to the feel as you seat the primer, keep your face out of the way, and hope for the best. You will be okay, I promise.

LoadedTech
01-09-2010, 08:29
For anybody who hasn't done this, prime an empty case and fire it in a gun. There will be no mushroom cloud over your house. Wear safety glasses, pay attention to the feel as you seat the primer, keep your face out of the way, and hope for the best. You will be okay, I promise.

I had a bad R-P case that I did this with, I shot a pencil out of the barrel across my shop, it was cool.

WiskyT
01-09-2010, 08:36
I had a bad R-P case that I did this with, I shot a pencil out of the barrel across my shop, it was cool.

I agree, that is pretty cool. A Sharpie could be used to mark people up.:supergrin:

My Glocks will launch a stick pen into the sheetrock in the cieling with just the force of the striker spring.

Colorado4Wheel
01-09-2010, 09:49
For anybody who hasn't done this, prime an empty case and fire it in a gun. There will be no mushroom cloud over your house. Wear safety glasses, pay attention to the feel as you seat the primer, keep your face out of the way, and hope for the best. You will be okay, I promise.

Better have your hearing protection on. They are loud.

byf43
01-09-2010, 10:02
Wash:

There are only two kinds of loaders... those who have had primers detonate and those who are going to have primers detonate.

Glade you came out unscathed... except for the pucker factor of course.

Jack

Well said, Jack!!


I've had ONE (knock wood) detonation. A single primer.
Well, it wasn't me, per se, but, it was on my machine (Dillon RL550B).

A good friend had bought some once-fired 9mm cases at a gunshow, and wanted to load them.
(Cheap bastige. Didn't own 9mm dies, and was [still is] too cheap to buy a Dillon!):supergrin:

These were MAGTECH cases.

I was separating the cases from the media (Dillon separator!) and putting them into a container near the press, and heard this "POW!!!!!"

My buddy jumped back and shrieked like a pre-teen girl at a Jonas Brothers Concert.:whistling: (No disrespect meant or intended towards pre-teen girls, btw!)

No harm to him or the machine! The primer that was being seated, detonated!
He did have a wetspot on the floor, beneath him, though.:rofl:

Upon close examination of the machine and the case, part of the primer that was being de-capped, was still in the primer pocket of the MAGTECH case!
The primer punch (RCBS Carbide 9mm dies) had left the 'ring' of the primer in the primer pocket.

Long story a little shorter, I handed my buddy a pair of safety glasses (I wear glasses that are ANSI approved, anyway) and we sized and deprimed the rest of the cases on my RockChucker.
Almost 75% of the rest of the cases had the same problem with the primers being destroyed instead of punched out.

The 'fresh' primers could be seated with no problems. (After the 'ring' being 'pried out' with a very small screwdriver.)
We thought that the primers were crimped into the MAGTECH cases, but, they weren't.

Needless to say. . . . neither he nor I use MAGTECH cases, now.
IF I find them in my supply, they get squashed with pliers and tossed.

Colorado4Wheel
01-09-2010, 10:51
I have been considering getting into reloading for match grade .223, How do you guys feel about hand priming? am I still facing the same odds of a primer detonation?

It's like driving a car. You always have a chance of a accident. It never is 0.000000000% chance. You just do it in as safe a manner as possible.

BK63
01-10-2010, 08:12
Wash:

There are only two kinds of loaders... those who have had primers detonate and those who are going to have primers detonate.

Glade you came out unscathed... except for the pucker factor of course.

Jack

I have to ask a question here as I'm not familiar with the type of presses where the primer went off. How would this be possible with say, the Dillon 550's I use? When you are seating a primer in a case, that primer is a ways from the tube full of primers. I think it's possible for a primer being seated to go off if there is dirt under it causing it to indent but even if it went off I don't see how it could set off a tube inches away. This multi detonation seems to be only in certain model presses. Sorry if this is a dumb question, I just want to make sure I can avoid this ever happening.

skyugo
01-10-2010, 13:00
Almost took my face off... stuck in the ceiling.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_4096.jpg?t=1262916629

Jack

jesus... :shocked:
i have much less desire to use a stacked primer setup now.

BK63
01-10-2010, 15:13
If the primer being seated into the shell is several inches forward of where the primer tube is and the primer goes off in a Dillon 550 I don't see any way it's going to set off the stack in the tube.

hoffy
01-10-2010, 15:31
I have had two in 30years, both on an RCBS automatic priming tool(bench mounted) both were 45 acp and fire shout out about 2 inches above the case, with me holding it :wow: though I always keep my fingers from the front of the case. Reason in both cases was dirty primer pockets I am pretty sure. A friend had a mass detonation with a handheld lee years ago, blew the thing apart. I never liked them, had to use the special shell holders (back then) and I broke the pot metal that holds the shell holder on 3 of them, though they replaced them, I gave the last one to my buddy who blew it up(he is the impatient type) I have an old Star Universal Progressive and it is built like a tank( Mike Dillon got his start modifying these) I have an RCBS Ammo Master Progressive I bought at a good price, but the primer tube is right in front. I got about 30k+ rounds on that one, and then I got a deal on a Hornady LNLAP and unfortunaely it was an early production run and is junk, though Hornady is supporting me somewhat( I bought it new, but it was a display missing parts and cost me a fortune to get it running, None of the old primer parts were available ) I have worn out three shell plate holders on the RCBS but they give me new ones, I got the hornady because of a steel shell plate holder. Prolly shoulda went blue.... Glasses are critical, a friend wouldnt wear them and I would not show him how reloading worked, he got mad but got over it. :faint:

GioaJack
01-10-2010, 18:54
If the primer being seated into the shell is several inches forward of where the primer tube is and the primer goes off in a Dillon 550 I don't see any way it's going to set off the stack in the tube.


Unclebob can answer that question with more authority than most of us, he spent 20 something years in the air force playing with explosives. From what I understand he was pretty good at it... and he's real easy to recognize, he's the deaf guy with only three fingers and half a nose.

Over time there have been several pictures posted here and on the BE forum of 550B primer detonations. Since a primer can be detonated in three ways, (that I know of) fire, direct contact and concussive induced detonation. I suspect that a primer detonating in close enough proximity to other primers, (those in the primer tube) it could conceivably cause sympathetic detonation of the other primers... at least the bottom most primer which would then in turn detonate those above it.

If it were not possible, or if it hadn't happened in the past I doubt that Dillon would have gone through the expense of enclosing them in a metal tube. :dunno:

Jack

unclebob
01-10-2010, 19:25
That was one of the questions I emailed Gary at Dillon about. Also if theyíre ever has been a detonation of filling the primer magazine from the primer pickup tube.
Sorry Jack, but I still have all of my body digits. Going deaf now that is a different story.

unclebob
01-12-2010, 08:24
Here is the reply I got back from Dillon on the two questions I asked. The first one would apply too all press that you fill the pickup tube then those go into the primer magazine.
The second one is on the priming system off a 550. Where you could set of the whole primer magazine. I think this also could apply too the LNL.

(Not familiar with any primer detonation simply from dropping primers out of the pickup tube into the magazine tube. If a primer jams and someone pokes at it, then yes.

On picking up a primer, if there is a live primer on the slide and it is manually pulled back too hard, that could ignite a primer. Canít recall any instances.

Thank you,
Dillon Precision Products, Inc.)

jbremount
01-15-2010, 04:44
Here is the reply I got back from Dillon on the two questions I asked. The first one would apply too all press that you fill the pickup tube then those go into the primer magazine.
The second one is on the priming system off a 550. Where you could set of the whole primer magazine. I think this also could apply too the LNL.

(Not familiar with any primer detonation simply from dropping primers out of the pickup tube into the magazine tube. If a primer jams and someone pokes at it, then yes.

On picking up a primer, if there is a live primer on the slide and it is manually pulled back too hard, that could ignite a primer. Canít recall any instances.

Thank you,
Dillon Precision Products, Inc.)


I choose the Dillon 550b over the Dillon 650/1050 because of the priming systems. One has finer control of the primer process with the manually priming 550b. I do not see how the Dillon 550 can blow a primer unless you got really heavy handed gorilla with the process. While reloading, I have pressed in some Federal primers hard enough to leave dents in them, and none have gone off. Plus, how could you set off the entire detached tube of primers on the Dillon 550b if the lone primer you were pressing into the cartridge was to go off.

Where are these posts of the Dillon 550b blowing primers tubes or blowing primers while being inserting into the cartridge? I would like to read them.

unclebob
01-15-2010, 12:41
I have pressed in some Federal primers hard enough to leave dents in them, and none have gone off. Plus, how could you set off the entire detached tube of primers on the Dillon 550b if the lone primer you were pressing into the cartridge was to go off.

Where are these posts of the Dillon 550b blowing primers tubes or blowing primers while being inserting into the cartridge? I would like to read them.

The dents I would say are from powder flakes that got in between the primer cup and primer and what you see is the indentation from the power.
Read my last post that Dillon wrote that you quoted. They are not aware of any one setting off the whole primer tube on the Dillon 550. But like he said and what I have said it is possible.
And in setting off one primer when seating a primer, read post 61.
Not every one that reloads is on any reloading forum. Not everyone what sets off a primer is going too tell anyone about it. Or post it on the Internet.
What is being said is that, maybe it has not happened yet or that anyone has admitted to it. But for the people that do read these posts, know that it is possible for it too happen

Wash-ar15
01-19-2010, 10:32
update:

sent the remaining parts back to Lee and as usual they sent me a new one. not as good as Dillion where a phone call will do,but Lee has always taken care of me.

Time to finish loading my 45.

Colorado4Wheel
01-19-2010, 17:51
jesus... :shocked:
i have much less desire to use a stacked primer setup now.


Well, your other choice is a plactic disc pointed at your face. I'll take the aluminum tube, in a steel protective case that will vent it to the cealing any time over some plastic disc pointed at my face with nothing inbetween.

unclebob
01-19-2010, 18:00
Well, your other choice is a plactic disc pointed at your face. I'll take the aluminum tube, in a steel protective case that will vent it to the cealing any time over some plastic disc pointed at my face with nothing inbetween.

:agree:110% Dillon and Hornady have come a long way, From when Jack blew up that primer tube.

GioaJack
01-19-2010, 18:12
:agree:110% Dillon and Hornady have come a long way, From when Jack blew up that primer tube.



Jeeze, unclebob, you're like an ex-wife... now you're bringing up things that happened 36 years ago. :faint:

Jack

unclebob
01-19-2010, 18:30
Jeeze, unclebob, you're like an ex-wife... now you're bringing up things that happened 36 years ago. :faint:

Jack

Are we getting senile now? You are the one who brought it up with pictures.
:tongueout:

kcbrown
01-19-2010, 19:05
Jeeze, unclebob, you're like an ex-wife... now you're bringing up things that happened 36 years ago. :faint:

Well, you two do talk like a married couple... :rofl:

doolyd
01-26-2010, 14:27
Won't happen on a LEE press because you have to push the tray forward and release the primer into the seating pocket. Then the tray is pushed backwards before you use the handle to seat the primer.

If it exploded it wouldn't be anywhere near the other primers in the tray to set them off. :tongueout:

Gunnut 45/454
01-26-2010, 20:07
Ah another progressive loading failure- Almost impossible on a single stage press! Atleast your ok!:supergrin:

cgk60
01-27-2010, 23:59
Wow i've been reloading at least 15 years and never had that happen.