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EL COLONEL
02-21-2010, 02:54
...pics anybody ?

noway
02-21-2010, 13:15
do a searched in this forum, I bet you will find a lot of pic of hogs taken from a wide variety of guns.

EL COLONEL
02-24-2010, 09:20
Anybody ? me, I have not hunted pig yet been to wet..........:faint:

EL COLONEL
02-25-2010, 20:32
Anyone ?

EL COLONEL
02-26-2010, 16:27
Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.........................................:whistling:

EL COLONEL
02-28-2010, 19:11
Lets see them......:supergrin:

jjsobba
03-18-2010, 07:16
Didn't make it pig hunting this year:crying:I am saving up to go Elk hunting this fall! I would like to see some pig pictures too.

GeorgiaGlockMan
04-14-2010, 12:02
Here are a few from one of our hunts

vafish
04-14-2010, 19:09
From over 10 years ago when I lived in Australia:

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n75/vafish/Hunting/06180008.jpg

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n75/vafish/Hunting/06190002.jpg

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n75/vafish/Hunting/06180004.jpg

Dennis in MA
04-14-2010, 19:56
Whachucallme?

The last pig hunt I was on, digital cameras used floppy drives.

CanyonMan
04-14-2010, 20:49
Very cool Vafish. Very cool...... :cool:




CanyonMan

duncan
04-15-2010, 19:28
Do you mix the wild pig in with domestic pork fo ryour table meat?

Hummer
04-15-2010, 22:59
Great pics, Vafish. Did you eat those critters, were they good, like domestic pork? I've wanted to hunt javalina and wild boar, someday....

CitizenOfDreams
04-15-2010, 23:04
http://i246.photobucket.com/albums/gg88/ozardofwiz/Pignosec.jpg

vafish
04-16-2010, 06:56
Great pics, Vafish. Did you eat those critters, were they good, like domestic pork? I've wanted to hunt javalina and wild boar, someday....

We did not keep the meat.

That was when I was in Australia, it was a feral animal control, the whole purpose was to kill as many pigs as possible and we didn't have enough coolers to put the meat in.

EL COLONEL
04-28-2010, 19:11
Vafish great pics , What caliber gun did u use ?

vafish
04-29-2010, 07:59
Vafish great pics , What caliber gun did u use ?

The bottom pic was the first gun I used, it's a Sako .223 bullet was a 62 gr JSP, I think it was the Winchester, but might have been PMC. I found it to be less than optimal. Lost one big boar that I shot, the sow I hit in the hind quarters, the boar my buddy is behind came charging at us as the sow squealed. Hit him 2 times with the .223 and my buddy hit him 3 times with the .243 as he charged across a big open field at us. The last shot with the .243 was in the head and put him down. Then I put one in the head of the still squealing sow.

After that I switched to the rifle I'm holding in the other photos. Its a Swedish Mauser M38 in 6.5x55 that I sporterized. Shot 7 more pigs after that and none of them ran off.

I know a lot of folks use a .223 for hogs, I like to use more gun.

EL COLONEL
04-29-2010, 17:18
Vafish , Great calibre you swithched to. My brother from another mother also shot 9 hogs with the 223 while they were in a trap ., would not put them down and after i saw that with my own eyes i decided not to use 223 for hogs i swithed to a rem. 700 in 300wsm . Missed a large hog yesterday at 160 yds . turns out i had accidentely put 2 contacts in one eye , what a dummy, lol , anyway hope to shoot one soon with the 300wsm and see how that does. Good hunting...........................................................:wavey:

vafish
04-29-2010, 20:11
Vafish , Great calibre you swithched to. My brother from another mother also shot 9 hogs with the 223 while they were in a trap ., would not put them down and after i saw that with my own eyes i decided not to use 223 for hogs i swithed to a rem. 700 in 300wsm . Missed a large hog yesterday at 160 yds . turns out i had accidentely put 2 contacts in one eye , what a dummy, lol , anyway hope to shoot one soon with the 300wsm and see how that does. Good hunting...........................................................:wavey:

Any .30 cal from the .30-30 on up should work fine on hogs. The .300 WSM should hammer them.

.223 can work on hogs with proper bullet selection and placement. But the larger calibers give you more room for error. You can't place shots on a hog like you do a deer, the lungs and heart are a bit further forward.

EL COLONEL
04-29-2010, 20:47
Vafish , Thanx...............................................:supergrin:

Archer-one
04-30-2010, 17:09
Any .30 cal from the .30-30 on up should work fine on hogs. The .300 WSM should hammer them.

.223 can work on hogs with proper bullet selection and placement. But the larger calibers give you more room for error. You can't place shots on a hog like you do a deer, the lungs and heart are a bit further forward.


or.....9mm :wavey::supergrin: I already posted this years success here, check it out if you didn't already. Awesome hunt.

CanyonMan
05-01-2010, 15:01
The bottom pic was the first gun I used, it's a Sako .223 bullet was a 62 gr JSP, I think it was the Winchester, but might have been PMC. I found it to be less than optimal. Lost one big boar that I shot, the sow I hit in the hind quarters, the boar my buddy is behind came charging at us as the sow squealed. Hit him 2 times with the .223 and my buddy hit him 3 times with the .243 as he charged across a big open field at us. The last shot with the .243 was in the head and put him down. Then I put one in the head of the still squealing sow.

After that I switched to the rifle I'm holding in the other photos. Its a Swedish Mauser M38 in 6.5x55 that I sporterized. Shot 7 more pigs after that and none of them ran off.

I know a lot of folks use a .223 for hogs, I like to use more gun.



I Like your thinking amigo. Also the 6.5x55. My first one was a very old ruger. Great shooter, and hand loading possibilities as you know, are endless.

Great looking Gun ya got there !



Good shooting.



CanyonMan

EL COLONEL
05-08-2010, 09:13
well guys, I hit about a 250lb hog at about 200yds with the 300wsm and 180 gr winchester xp3 bullett . from a kneeling position . Hit it to far back, it let out a loud cry and took off runing as i was walking towards it , i shot again while walking maybe at 150 and then maybe at 140yds and missed. Made me so mad that i could not secure it ., i hate to wound an animal and not finish him off. Looked for it for about 45min and could not find it then it got dark. Not to mention i was really looking forward to some hog meat...........:faint:

n0vember
05-08-2010, 16:55
well guys, I hit about a 250lb hog at about 200yds with the 300wsm and 180 gr winchester xp3 bullett . from a kneeling position . Hit it to far back, it let out a loud cry and took off runing as i was walking towards it , i shot again while walking maybe at 150 and then maybe at 140yds and missed. Made me so mad that i could not secure it ., i hate to wound an animal and not finish him off. Looked for it for about 45min and could not find it then it got dark. Not to mention i was really looking forward to some hog meat...........:faint:

get a dog, track it, put it out if its misery, don't be an irresponsible a'hole...

packin23
05-08-2010, 19:36
I took this with a .270 WBY mag. Dropped him where he stood. Clean shot from 160 yds. Entered just behind the left ear and exited in front of the right ear.

http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g178/digbog/100_1837.jpg

EL COLONEL
05-10-2010, 16:56
:shocked:Thank you.......................................

EL COLONEL
06-08-2010, 20:28
Finally put a hog down 74in from snout to tail about 220lbs ( ? ) . 101 yards away on my belly with a caldwell bipod. Hit him in the neck area dropped , kicked 3 times and that was it. Gun was rem 700 sps in 300wsm with 150gr ballistic silvertips. Just sharing...................................................:supergrin:

mdhandyman
06-08-2010, 21:09
Lets see the pic's or it did'nt happen. lol J/K I'm going next month .30-06 using the same 150gr silvertips.

duncan
06-08-2010, 22:24
Finally put a hog down 74in from snout to tail about 220lbs ( ? ) . 101 yards away on my belly with a caldwell bipod. Hit him in the neck area dropped , kicked 3 times and that was it. Gun was rem 700 sps in 300wsm with 150gr ballistic silvertips. Just sharing...................................................:supergrin:

Nice!

EL COLONEL
06-09-2010, 02:56
No pics , need to get a camera , really want one..........:wavey:

EL COLONEL
06-11-2010, 03:06
Anybody else shot a pig ? ...................................................:dunno:

Lethal Farce
06-13-2010, 19:51
This sow was taken with a 45-70 and it was instant. I severed a vein or artery. The blood squirted about 12" inches up for several seconds.
LF

Lethal Farce
06-13-2010, 19:58
Big male taken by my son. Very exciting hunt. Several hogs bayed up in some 6 ft tall grass for over an hour. We could not see anything, just could hear the dogs and pigs. One sow ran and mowed my kid down, fortunately he was only bruised.
LF

Beware Owner
06-17-2010, 11:28
I want to go this year, did you guys bleed and dress them on the field?

Lethal Farce
06-17-2010, 13:14
"I want to go this year, did you guys bleed and dress them on the field?"

We always do. But always wear gloves and becareful- There are things in that will make you sick.

Beware Owner
06-17-2010, 13:29
"I want to go this year, did you guys bleed and dress them on the field?"

We always do. But always wear gloves and becareful- There are things in that will make you sick.

Do you leave anything on the field or take it all? How long do you let them bleed? Any favorite way to bag it up?

Lethal Farce
06-17-2010, 20:35
Usually we leave the guts for the coyotes, etc. Unless the landowner prefers we don't. I usually try to find out. I never blled an animal, not sure, but believe "bleeding" is an old school thing that is not necessary. No Bagging, just toss it it the truck, or on a atv.

Beware Owner
06-18-2010, 11:46
Usually we leave the guts for the coyotes, etc. Unless the landowner prefers we don't. I usually try to find out. I never blled an animal, not sure, but believe "bleeding" is an old school thing that is not necessary. No Bagging, just toss it it the truck, or on a atv.

I'm looking to hunt in county nonprivate areas. Bleeding is hanging the animal by it's hind legs and cutting the aorta to let it dry of it's blood (at least that's what I've termed it). I take it you dressed the animal yourself, have you paid anyone to do it for you?

Lethal Farce
06-18-2010, 12:02
To bad its pork, if you keep insisting you want to bleed it. Get a Rabbi to bless it as well, and maybe you can sell it a kosher. :tongueout:
LF

Beware Owner
06-18-2010, 12:09
To bad its pork, if you keep insisting you want to bleed it. Get a Rabbi to bless it as well, and maybe you can sell it a kosher. :tongueout:
LF

Makes it that much easier to clean, I'd say. :tongueout:

Lethal Farce
06-18-2010, 12:18
No, not at all. If you field dress properly, and did not make a gut shot or something like that, there is very little blood or mess. Look at the pic, there was very little blood. The guts will come out in one kinda tidy package.

n0vember
06-18-2010, 17:28
No, not at all. If you field dress properly, and did not make a gut shot or something like that, there is very little blood or mess. Look at the pic, there was very little blood. The guts will come out in one kinda tidy package.

One thing I would highly recommend seeing your pictures: hang the animal at its hind legs before dressing it. first, it is a lot loss dirt, that can come into the animal and contaminate it. Also, all the mess there might be does not stick to the better parts of meat located in the back but also slides downwards. More importantly, gravity helps a lot with the guts coming out in "one kinda tidy package" ;)

two things I was wondering is do you guys open the pelvis and crack the bone and do you open the ribcage? I used to do both, still open the ribcage but keep the pelvis closed and just cut out the anus.. basically like this:
http://www.plagge-germany.de/Downloads/Aufbrechen_eines_Uberlauferkeilers_im_Hangen_mit_Ringeln1.pdf

I know, it is German but I reckon the pictures are self explanatory

CanyonMan
06-19-2010, 08:06
Usually we leave the guts for the coyotes, etc. Unless the landowner prefers we don't. I usually try to find out. I never blled an animal, not sure, but believe "bleeding" is an old school thing that is not necessary. No Bagging, just toss it it the truck, or on a atv.



True. Once the animal (whatever it is) hits the ground, we always 'field dress' it right there on the spot.' If there is to be a hunt in the same spot that evening or next morning, we sometimes drag the animal away and in the back of the truck bed and down away from there a piece to field dress it. (this is not needed either really) but we do it to keep the 'yotes' out of the area so game won't be frightened away by them, 'not the gut pile'. I've seen deer sniff a gut pile from a buddy of theirs before.


So myth one.. Bleeding, Is not necessary if you have properly field dressed your game, and take a hand full of paper towles and wipe out the inside of the now empty body cavity. We usually also spread the rib cage apart by hand just a little and place a stick across it to help the cooling out process. (unless the gutted animal is to be dragged through much dirt or sand debre etc.


Myth two: Cutting off the Tarsal and metatarsal is not necessary either.

Both are located between the hoof and the upper hock on the leg. No one I know eats the hoof and upper leg 4" above the hoof ! (yuck). Many a hunter have ruined their game meat buy cutting these glands off filled with smelly musk, and then sticking their knife back into good meat. These glands are used for several purposes. To attrack does, and to mark territory. There is a little tube like structure in the leg that allows musk sent to be conveyed to the ground through and between the splay of the hoof as the deer walks and leaves a sent. Deer use this silent comunication telegraph to locate and trail each other, among other things. There is NO need to cut off these glads. Everything smelly is going 'down' not up the leg.


Myth three: Cutting the throat. Again to "bleed out.' Already covered the fact that the shot itself, and the field dressing gets all the blood out you need to. This as well is a myth to cut the throat.


Rapid field dressing, especially in warmer weather, and dabbing out excess blood out of the upper body cav, will ensure good meat, along with getting the hide off ASAP, and getting the meat cooled down ASAP. Also aging the deer meat for 4-7 days make for some really tender meat. If you do not live in a cold climate and cannot do this. Butcher your deer, make your cuts. Clear everything out of the "potato tub' the bottom tray in your frig. and lay the meat on the racks. Your wife won't freak out if you assure her there will be no more blood hit that tray than you could place in the palm of your cupped hand. Which washes right out with cold water any way. Do this for 3-5 days. Very tender meat, for those who cannot hang their deer say from a tree or such or get to a cooler, or just want to do it yourself and not pay some one. Very easy. Very tasty! ;)


FWIW.


Good hunting all.




CanyonMan

Beware Owner
06-19-2010, 09:14
Ok, let me see, what I need for field dressing a pig/deer, please correct me:

Hacksaw for cutting the head off, rope to tie the animal by the hind legs and raise above the ground, rubber gloves to keep my hands clean, water to wash it and myself up, a tarp to wrap it up, and a good knife, which I'd really like some guidance on. What knife do you recommend for camping/field dressing? I want a knife I can use for both.

n0vember
06-19-2010, 19:08
What Canyon Man said about wiping out the carcass... I am not sure, if that is such a smart move. You might press germs and dirt into the meat and also spread it around. I reckon it would be better to wash it out hanging head down and then let it dry.


Hacksaw for cutting the head off,

Not at all, all you need is a ruff idea of anatomy and a not too dull knife. What you need to do is just cut around the neck right between head and first vertebra. You should then be able to just twist the head off, after rotating it 360 just cut all the remaining stuff and there you go, head is off.


a good knife, which I'd really like some guidance on. What knife do you recommend for camping/field dressing? I want a knife I can use for both.

What I use are the cheap Mora knives from Sweden
http://www.hkgt.de/shop/media/images/mo1-0511_01-large.jpg

Basically every knife is fine for field dressing as long as the blade is not too long, the size of your index finger should suffice. I find it easiest to work with a drop point blade, but that is just personal preference, I reckon. The sharper the blade is pointed, the easier it is to accidently cut the guts and create a proper mess.
It helps if it can be easily re-sharpened. I would highly recommend to NOT buy a folder as all the meat and blood will get into it and stick there and rot. With regards to hygiene, plastic and metal is what you want to look for material wise, grips made from wood or antler, a sheath made from leather - looks nice, yes, but is a good breeding ground for germs.

As with the above question about cutting off the head, most of it is just technique, the tools are just 20% of it. If you know a butcher, ask if he can show you how to dress an animal - if you have seen it once or twice or done it while someone was watching, you will realize that it is not exactly rocket sciene, you just have to know a few things that will make it a lot easier.

The only tool I use for field dressing besides my knife is this thing:
http://www.siegert.at/catalog/images/aufbrechzange.jpg

I have no idea what these are called in English, in Germany they are specifically manufactured for opening the pelvis and the ribcage. I reckon any pruning shear would work as well.
with regards to the tarp - I do not see, why you would to use a tarp to wrap it up. Bear in mind, that the meat should be cooled down to roughly 40F within 24 hours, wrapping it up, does not help in this process.

CanyonMan
06-20-2010, 07:42
What Canyon Man said about wiping out the carcass... I am not sure, if that is such a smart move. You might press germs and dirt into the meat and also spread it around. I reckon it would be better to wash it out hanging head down and then let it dry.


My friend. Taking a handful of white paper towles and "dabbing out" a cup or two of blood from the uper chest cavity (during field dressing) within the rib cage area has nothing to do with germs or harm to the carcass. In fact allowing that old blood that attracts dirt and everything else, and then turns to "muck" is really bad. ;) The "washing out with water hose or such, comes after the deer is hung and ready to skin. The 'dabbing out of extra mucky blood in the upper cavity' is while the animal lays on the ground and has just been field dressed. We do not hang an amimal up then gut it, we do it soon as its hits the ground, and get the cavity to cooling ASAP. Ensures even better meat taste.

There is no harm what soever in "dabbing " with paper towles in the rib cage upper cavity and keeeping the already dirty blood from gettng to the hind quarters. We've been doing this (only when or if needed) for 50years, on everything with 4 legs from W. Texas to the Rockies and back.

We've also butcherd a lot of cattle over the years on the ranch as well, sorta learned a trick or two. ;) No, we don't need to 'dab' in the cattle ! Ha.


This is not something that always needs done, but it is a very good way to ensure a more bacteria and germ free meat within the carcass, and 'does help' promote a more rapid cooling to the carcass which is an obvious good thing. Simple dabbing (not spreading) remaining mucky blood in the upper cavity (if needed). ;)

Nothing is set in stone on game. Sometimes we shoot a deer so far down in the canyons he has to packed out on the back in quarters. Sometimes on elk or deer you have to take your horse to get them out, or a pack mule.

Somtimes game is immediately hung from a high tree limb (after field dressing) to cool for a few days or more, on and on and on we could go. But I can assure you that we/I have been well taught as youngins how to ensure the best care for the meat. I carried this practice (and more) through 25 years of guiding, and have taught what I know to my kids and hope they'll pass it along to theirs. Most of these things seem simple and insignificant, but their really not. Just common sence things really.

Most folks deer/wild game meat taste like deer/wild game meat. We've had city folks eat our wild game, that would never eat wild game, and did not at the time know they were even doing so, and loved it. Then we told them what it was. That is always fun. Sometimes after boasting on how great it was they freak out, and most just say 'man I got to do this more.." Haha.

The exception is rattle snake. It is pretty much a given what that is right off the bat ! haha.


Gotta go.
Fathers Day Breakfast being paid for by the family for me ! Headed for town.



Good hunting.




CanyonMan

n0vember
06-20-2010, 15:03
My friend. Taking a handful of white paper towles and "dabbing out" a cup or two of blood from the uper chest cavity (during field dressing) within the rib cage area has nothing to do with germs or harm to the carcass.
and keeeping the already dirty blood from gettng to the hind quarters.

Alright, now I get it - what I was thinking was, that you're basically wiping the whole inner carcass.


The "washing out with water hose or such, comes after the deer is hung and ready to skin.
I have a few litres of water in the car to wash out, what is left in the carcass.


We do not hang an amimal up then gut it, we do it soon as its hits the ground, and get the cavity to cooling ASAP. Ensures even better meat taste.

I wait roughly ten minutes after shooting and then start field dressing, as soon as I get to the animal. I just take the extra-minute to find a tree nearby whereon I can hang it. If there is no tree around, well then field dressing without hanging it is. It's not like I don't know how to do that ;)



We've been doing this (only when or if needed) for 50years, on everything with 4 legs from W. Texas to the Rockies and back.

But I can assure you that we/I have been well taught as youngins how to ensure the best care for the meat. I carried this practice (and more) through 25 years of guiding, and have taught what I know to my kids and hope they'll pass it along to theirs.

If I think back what has been "good practice" and has been taught in Germany only 20 years ago, I don't think "We've been doing it like this for X years" is a good point to make. ;)

On the other hand, I am by law required to maintain almost as high hygiene standards as a butcher does, which is why I might be a bit anal about hygiene and game dressing.

What you've been saying about the taste of wild game and people not knowing how tasty properly processed wild game is, is pretty similar to what I have experienced here.

CanyonMan
06-20-2010, 16:08
Alright, now I get it - what I was thinking was, that you're basically wiping the whole inner carcass.



I have a few litres of water in the car to wash out, what is left in the carcass.




I wait roughly ten minutes after shooting and then start field dressing, as soon as I get to the animal. I just take the extra-minute to find a tree nearby whereon I can hang it. If there is no tree around, well then field dressing without hanging it is. It's not like I don't know how to do that ;)




If I think back what has been "good practice" and has been taught in Germany only 20 years ago, I don't think "We've been doing it like this for X years" is a good point to make. ;)

On the other hand, I am by law required to maintain almost as high hygiene standards as a butcher does, which is why I might be a bit anal about hygiene and game dressing.

What you've been saying about the taste of wild game and people not knowing how tasty properly processed wild game is, is pretty similar to what I have experienced here.




Its kinda funny really. I mean in Tennesse where I have some realitives, they hang there game in a tree and gut it. In East Texas they do the same (all when possible), other places this way and that way. We just go over to said DRT animal and get after it where he lays. Just always the way we've down it in this part of the West at least. One reason might be, there ain't many trees ! ha ha.

Sounds like your doing all you can to ensure good meat. ;)


Stay safe and good hunting to ya amigo !



CanyonMan

noway
06-20-2010, 16:59
Hanging a animal out for bleeding is not going to be very helpful after the heart has stopped. Best practices is just to gut it as quick as possible to eliminate heat and bacteria growth. Dead animals start decaying internal ASAP after the boiler room has been shutdown.

I've never hanged an animal to help in bleeding but like mention above to ease the operation of skinning and quartering the animal.

On field dressing, I try to leave all that I'm not going take or keep or eat in the field. That means on a hog, head, guts, liver, heart and lungs.

On a quick easy field saw, you can can get one of the chain/rope types that works wonder in the field and carries very compact. They are great for splitting the pelvic area also.

Or carry a strong spined machette.

vafish
06-21-2010, 06:29
I'm like Canyonman and usually just gut them where they lay.

I used to just use a knife, but this last year a buddy of mine showed me his way of sawing through the pelvis and the rib cage. He does some deer culls every year and has to gut 15-20 deer in a day. It does seem a lot faster then the way I used to do it.

One thing for us Yanks to keep in mind when n0vember mentions his way of doing things. I believe the term for him is Jaegermiester or Master Hunter, he is responsible for the wild game management on a large tract of land. He gets to sell the wild game meat he recovers as part of his pay for managing the game animals. (IIRC he also has to pay for damages done by the animals as well) So he is held to health standards like a commercial butcher shop would be. There are certain "best practices" he must follow when handling the meat.

The British have a very similar system, if you have some time to spend do a Google Search for "British Deer Stalking" and look through the training and testing they have to go through to become a deer hunter.

As for knives, I agree with n0vember, I like the Sweedish Mora knives. I get them at Sportsmansguide. $25 gets you 2 knives.

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=442686

http://image.sportsmansguide.com/dimage/137820_ts.JPG?cell=300,300&cvt=jpeg

They hold a pretty decent edge and are easy to sharpen. And at $12 each if you lose one or a buddy ends up with it in his pack you aren't too upset. Just a word of caution, they are not stainless steel so you need to clean and oil them after gutting a deer.

EL COLONEL
06-23-2010, 07:55
How bout some more pics of pigs.......................:pig::pig:

CanyonMan
06-23-2010, 09:53
How bout some more pics of pigs.......................:pig::pig:



OK OK.. For fun, let me introduce you to Bud the 1st. He is doing his job and getting some huge porkers out and herding them into another area for us. haha.

I know its not the kinda pigs you wanted to see. But what the heck. Break up the monotony till some one shows you their dead pigs ! :rofl:


http://i869.photobucket.com/albums/ab256/yrag5951/GT%20stuff/IMG_0106.jpg

Take Care EL COLONEL. ;)




CM

Beware Owner
06-23-2010, 10:10
Those pigs are big.

EL COLONEL
06-23-2010, 10:17
Canyon man , that was funny thanx,,,,:wavey:

CanyonMan
06-23-2010, 21:15
Canyon man , that was funny thanx,,,,:wavey:



:rofl:


Yeh old bud is no longer with us, we have a New bud (as it were) now, . We think the rattlers got bud the 1st. He was really good at rangling hogs and cattle. Thought you would get a kick out of it.

Yes, as someone said "they are big..." They are very big some go as much as 450#'s. ;) We sold most all off years ago over 400 + because of market drop in price. Now just a bore or two and a few sows for personal "freezer meat" when the youngins come.....


It was a pic for fun !


CanyonMan

EL COLONEL
07-19-2010, 20:46
More pigs anybody ??

EL COLONEL
07-27-2010, 16:50
Anyone with any more pigs ?

Great Googly Moogly
07-28-2010, 01:27
Whachucallme?

The last pig hunt I was on, digital cameras used floppy drives.

The last pig hunt I was was on, digital referred to watches.