Why resize the bulge? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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10mm29
03-03-2010, 22:20
So I am new to glocks and reloading for them. I have been doing a lot of reading and most seem to recommend an aftermarket barrel for brass life do to the generous size of the glock chamber.

My question is why not leave the bulge in the brass at the head. Once it has expanded to fit the chamber it shouldn't expand anymore. I can see brass not lasting long if you are work hardening it every time you resize and shoot it again.

Does this just not work for some reason, trouble fitting rounds in the mag maybe?

ChaneyD
03-03-2010, 22:30
It doesn't work if someone else picks up this brass and reloads for another firearm. It usually only affects the .40S&W more than any other caliber.

Taterhead
03-03-2010, 23:01
I have wondered this myself because I load bolt action rifle too. Neck sizing is good for a bolt-action bottle neck case because it is fire-formed to the chamber. However, I full-length resize my Glock brass because 1) the bulge is asymmetrical and 2) I don't want feeding to be compromised. The bulge is created in the six o'clock position. If the case feeds in any position that is not oriented with the bulge at 6 o'clock, it seems like the case would be slightly tilted. Plus, it might be kind of tight.

I get plenty of rounds through my reloaded brass. The limit to brass life is that they tend to shrink below specs after a while.

why
03-05-2010, 16:19
I may be missing something here, but all the bulges I have seem are assymetrical with respect to the diameter of the base. The odds that this would feed into exactly the same position are very low, even in a bolt gun.

jbremount
03-05-2010, 17:19
So I am new to glocks and reloading for them. I have been doing a lot of reading and most seem to recommend an aftermarket barrel for brass life do to the generous size of the glock chamber.

My question is why not leave the bulge in the brass at the head. Once it has expanded to fit the chamber it shouldn't expand anymore. I can see brass not lasting long if you are work hardening it every time you resize and shoot it again.

Does this just not work for some reason, trouble fitting rounds in the mag maybe?


MY free 2cent/and Quick answer...

The buldge is large enough to cause the round to not chamber in your gun consistently. You will repeatedly get failure to chamber while shooting. This is especially true if you shoot the ammo in another gun with a tighter chamber. Out of round ammo(bulged ammo included) is bad reloading. Initially, the buldge will not allow your reloads to fully seat in the case gauge as you test for correctness while reloading. Failure of your ammo to chamber in the case gauge is the first indicator that your reloads are not up to par. The buldge is an easy fix, just use a Lee sizing die and your reloads will chamber in the case gauge and chamber in all your different pistol's chamber.

The aftermarket barrels have a much, much smaller chamber and the correct rifling for shooting lead bullets. Lead bullets are cheaper to reload and shoot. Aftermarket barrels also have full case support and "will not" leave a buldge in the brass after shooting. I talking full case support for a semi- auto pistol, at the end of the day and to cut to the end of the chase...., with the aftermarket barrel, the cartridge is fully supported "where it counts" in a semi- auto cartridge. The tighter chamber and full case support will also allow you to more safely shoot higher pressure ammo as you will not get a failure such as seen in the stock barrel's unsupported six o'clock position.

Taterhead
03-05-2010, 23:15
I may be missing something here, but all the bulges I have seem are assymetrical with respect to the diameter of the base. The odds that this would feed into exactly the same position are very low, even in a bolt gun.

That was my point exactly about the Glock brass. Brass bulge is not desireable with the "Glock Belly" in semi-auto pistols. However, neck sizing is appropriate for bolt action rifles with bottle-neck cases. The fire-formed case fits the chamber of the bolt-action rifle. That is desireable, as the OP alluded to, to minimize working the brass. Plus the fire-formed case tends to promote accuracy.

But full-length resizing is appropriate for cases used in actions other than bolt action.

10mm29
03-07-2010, 02:14
Well I would never dream of doing this for anything but range ammo, and obviously it is barrel specific or possibly glock barrel specific.

I was messing around with a couple pieces of once fired double tap that I wasn't going to reload. If you leave the bottom .40 untouched it will chamber fine and I can spin it all the way around freely. However this probably would not be a very good solution because each time you fired it you would create a bulge in another spot and then it would no longer fit and would need full length resized anyway.

The other big problem would be the inconsistent case volume. Overall just too much work. I was hoping not to have to spend another 20% of what the gun cost to get another barrel, but I placed my order a few minutes ago.

ChaneyD
03-07-2010, 07:29
I was messing around with a couple pieces of once fired double tap that I wasn't going to reload. If you leave the bottom .40 untouched it will chamber fine and I can spin it all the way around freely. However this probably would not be a very good solution because each time you fired it you would create a bulge in another spot and then it would no longer fit and would need full length resized anyway.

The problem with leaving the bottom of the case untouched is that it won't drop into a case gage if you are using one (which you should). That bulge will prevent it from dropping in. As a side note, the bulge is NOT Glock specific, just a bit more pronounced than other mfg's barrels. Aftermarket is good.

glocknick
03-07-2010, 15:01
i was thinking of buying the lee bulge buster but i dont know if i really need it since i only have a glock 29 and am not my 10mm ammo in any other gun. i resize with an rcbs die and it leaves a slight bulge and the head. the bulge that is left there doesnt affect performance when i fire my relaods in my 29 but i could see a potential problem if i were to use it in tighter chamber such as an aftermarket barrell.

ChaneyD
03-07-2010, 17:20
I'm not getting a bulge in my G29. My headspace seems to be full head spaceing. Seems to only affect the .40S&W.

Taterhead
03-08-2010, 21:41
The problem with leaving the bottom of the case untouched is that it won't drop into a case gage if you are using one (which you should). That bulge will prevent it from dropping in. As a side note, the bulge is NOT Glock specific, just a bit more pronounced than other mfg's barrels. Aftermarket is good.

I was instructing my buddy on how to load for his XD .40 S&W Subbie. I noticed that his brass bulged virtually identically to the Glock bulge. I could have sworn that we must have picked up some stray Glock brass, but that was not the case (pun not intended).

ChaneyD
03-09-2010, 06:39
I was instructing my buddy on how to load for his XD .40 S&W Subbie. I noticed that his brass bulged virtually identically to the Glock bulge. I could have sworn that we must have picked up some stray Glock brass, but that was not the case (pun not intended).

Yeah, unfortunately the Glock got a bad rap about that even though there are a lot of other brands out there that also have unsupported chambers. I still pick up range brass and sort the bulged from non-bulged and resize it using the Redding GR-X die. Bulge completely gone!