Is there work as a Glock gunsmith? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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zoti
03-19-2010, 17:56
I'm not familiar that much with gunsmithing. The Glock seems to be a very easy gun to maintain. The parts are rather cheap and it's easy to work on. I'm very technical and I was wondring if I could do gun smithing as a side job.

Are there levels of gunsmithing?

Is there demand?

I can see that some people would like to have sights replaced and take the gun the a gunsmith because they have not done it before or don't have the tool.

So assuming replacing the sights is an easy job, what would be a very hard job? I'm not talking about manufacturing a barrel or anything like that. maybe a compleate rebuild of a gun?

JohnKSa
03-19-2010, 19:43
There is probably work in replacing sights, but most of the other things on a Glock can be replaced/serviced by the average gun owner.

My guess is that you'd probably have to take in other kinds of gunsmithing work to make ends meet.

zoti
03-19-2010, 20:10
OK. What kind of other gunsmithing work is there? I'm asking because I'm not familier with the field. Do you do gunsmithing?

JohnKSa
03-19-2010, 22:49
I do most of my own gunsmithing (I know my limitations! :supergrin:) and occasionally some simple work for friends and club members.

Probably the simplest gunsmithing work that a person could do that people will pay for is mounting and boresighting scopes on hunting rifles and replacing sights/installing night sights on pistols.

Those tasks are generally quick and easy to do and hard to screw up if you have some specialized tools which most people don't have and won't purchase due to price. They don't require a lot of skill, just some very basic know-how.

There are many other types of gunsmithing that require varying amounts of skill such as:

Stock work (stockmaking, grip making, bedding, recoil pads, checkering, finishing, inletting)
Metal finish work (polishing, blueing, parkerizing, plating, coatings)
Barrel work (rebarreling, lapping, recrowning, rechambering, shortening)
Action work (trigger jobs, trueing actions, spring tuning, lapping)
and lots more...

zoti
03-20-2010, 00:28
Thanks.

BBJones
03-20-2010, 06:17
Seeing as you don't know much about gunsmithing before you are thinking of taking it up as a job, I am going to say it may not be the right line of work for you. Years of experience before becoming a professional is the usual way of doing things. Depending on the work you might do, you could need to get an FFL license.

lethal tupperwa
03-20-2010, 06:32
The first step would be TAKING A GLOCK ARMORERS COURSE

zoti
03-20-2010, 08:14
I was not planing to open a shop tomorrow. I was thinking of doing dome small work first and progress as I go.

Six month ago I did not know anything about welding as well but decided to take on a very big task. I know it's hard to judge someone off a post off the Internet but it will give you some idea.

http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f16/building-boxing-ring-991176/

Starbelly
03-20-2010, 08:33
That's awesome. Not only the fact that you built that ring, but you posted on Sherdog (I've been visiting that sight since 02)

zoti
03-20-2010, 08:46
Anything is possible. Even shutting up the skeptics on sherdog. Lol.

etravix
03-20-2010, 08:53
Nice work and it's definitely made to last.

mccallisterbrian
03-20-2010, 08:54
Since I am a glock armorer and a certified gunsmith I would like to put in my $.02. When it comes to working on glocks all you really need is the armorers course. if you plan on doing more technical issues with other firearms then training as a gunsmith is a necessity. I have been in the firearms field for over 20 years and i have fixed to many firearms that the average person tried to do with out the proper training and knowalge of the firearm they are trying to work on. I would advise to go to a good gunsmith if you are not sure 100% of what you are wanting to do.

zoti
03-20-2010, 10:08
Thanks Mc. I appriciate the input. I was thinking of doing Glock work to start with. Then maybe expanding.

So I have been reading a bit about The Glock armorer couse. Can you tell me some more about it?

mccallisterbrian
03-22-2010, 05:43
If you go into glocks or gssf web site gssfonline.com and go on to the training section there is info on the Armorers course. It will have a desription of them as well as the locations. The cost is $150 for the 1 day course. To be eligible to take the Armorers Course you must be an active law enforcement or military officer, private security,GLOCK Stocking Dealer/Range Program Employee or current GSSF member. So the easiest way is to join GSSF It is $35. This class will helpp you get the knowage you need for what you are wanting to do.

I am getting back into piad gunsmithing again. I plan on being just a custom glock armorer. What what i plan on doing is not something the avarage person can do unless you have the technical knowledge about firearms. I have over 15 years of experience in just working as a LEO glock armorer. Plus 20 years working for the Government as aCertified Armorer/ Gunsmith where i got my start in the fire arms industry. I have carried a glock as my duty weapon since 1999, But have been an armorer and certified gunsmith since 1995.

I wish you good luck in your endeavors. The only way that you can make your goal happen is with education in what you want to work on. It is easy to get it , but it will just take you time on your behalf.

If you need any help you are in the right place to receive it

Glock-Doc
01-22-2015, 06:58
For operating a gunsmith business (even if you are just swapping out Glock parts and not selling anything), don't you have to also be licensed by the ATF as a Gun Dealer?

I looked into this on the ATF's website and figured out it was just too much paperwork and government regulations to offset the small amount of money I might making fixing Glocks as a side business.

I signed up this year for the Glock Armorer's class just for personal education, and not to open a business.

mtstream
01-23-2015, 00:25
There's really not any money to be made as an Armorer. Every dealer has at least one and Glock sends their own armorer's to the GSSF matches to repair/replace parts for free. I wanted to do a complete refurb on my original G17 but it was cheaper to send it to Glock than to purchase the parts at the Certified Armorer's pricing. Armorer's aren't allowed to mark up replacement parts and there really isn't anything they're authorized to do that people will pay enough for that it will make it worth your time (or cover liability insurance).

Having said all of that, I still recommend attending the Armorer's class. Just don't expect to be paid for what you've learned.

j8ksdad
01-23-2015, 22:30
We could use more around here. I went to three shops and the shortest estimate I got just to install sights was three weeks.

mtstream
01-23-2015, 22:36
Wow, that's crazy. Takes less than 10min.

Batesmotel
01-23-2015, 22:41
A real gunsmith is a master machinist, not just a parts swap technician.

Gunsmithing is a technical skill as well as an art. Check into machine classes at a local college. That is a good start.

And to the couple of guys here who turn into total dirtbags EVERY time I say this...bite me....again.

j8ksdad
01-23-2015, 22:42
Wow, that's crazy. Takes less than 10min.


Yep, I've done everything else to the gun myself. Just don't have the tool to do the sights. The place I dropped it off at told me it only takes about 20 minutes but they have tons of work so it may be a day, it may be three weeks.

Another shop told me 4-6 weeks.

mtstream
01-24-2015, 01:38
Yep, I've done everything else to the gun myself. Just don't have the tool to do the sights. The place I dropped it off at told me it only takes about 20 minutes but they have tons of work so it may be a day, it may be three weeks.



Another shop told me 4-6 weeks.


Wow. If you're anywhere near Dallas, PM me and I'll put them on for you - free

mtstream
01-24-2015, 01:43
A real gunsmith is a master machinist, not just a parts swap technician.



Gunsmithing is a technical skill as well as an art. Check into machine classes at a local college. That is a good start.



And to the couple of guys here who turn into total dirtbags EVERY time I say this...bite me....again.


Say what? That a real gunsmith is a machinist? That's easy to prove correct, go look at the course curriculum for the (very few) gunsmith schools.

DWARREN123
01-24-2015, 04:36
Talk to a local gunsmith and see how the profession is. Most I have talked to say it is not a money making business unless extremely well known and do very extensive work.
YMMV

Drock720
01-26-2015, 21:19
I am also looking into doing gunsmithing on the side. I have a very nice shop with a lot of tools already. Im currently in the process of getting my FFL. I signed up with GSSF so that I could take the Glock Armorers course in March. I have also got alot of information from American Gunsmithing Institute. They have already sent me alot of stuff and they are recognized as the best online gunsmithing school. Im going to start off with general gun repair and detail cleaning. There are several people on these forums that will tell you not to "waste" your time but realize most of these folks enjoy guns just as much as you and I. I can tell you that I have just been kinda spreading my plans by word of mouth for the past couple of weeks and I already have 7 people waiting for me to start. Make a checklist, do some research, and Im sure you will do well. Im going to start off by getting my FFL, become a certified Glock armorer, and take the Practical Gunsmithing course through AGI. I have created a separate checkings account and I'm just going to start from there to see how it goes. If there's no money in it then I won't be out a thing because I will have everything I need to do my own work. I have checked the competition in the area and there is only one reputable gunsmith within a 100 mile radius of my residence. I spoke with a gun dealer in my hometown the other day and he advised that 90% of the people that come into his shop are just looking for someone to do a detail cleaning so don't let someone tell you that everyone cleans their own guns and have no need for that. That will help you build up your funds pretty quick to get the things you need to do more extensive work or in my case, pay to get a gunsmithing degree.

mtstream
01-26-2015, 21:25
Don't forget your liability insurance. If you touch a strangers gun and it later goes boom, guess who they're going to blame?

Drock720
01-26-2015, 21:37
Yeah I forgot to mention that. I am currently inquiring general liability prices at guninsurance.com. I have heard they are reasonable... we shall see.

mtstream
01-26-2015, 22:04
I'm pretty sure AIG offers a product for firearm related work also.

my_old_glock
01-27-2015, 11:39
I'm not familiar that much with gunsmithing. The Glock seems to be a very easy gun to maintain. The parts are rather cheap and it's easy to work on. I'm very technical and I was wondring if I could do gun smithing as a side job.

Are there levels of gunsmithing?

Is there demand?

I can see that some people would like to have sights replaced and take the gun the a gunsmith because they have not done it before or don't have the tool.

So assuming replacing the sights is an easy job, what would be a very hard job? I'm not talking about manufacturing a barrel or anything like that. maybe a compleate rebuild of a gun?


I don't think there is such a thing as a Glock gunsmith.

Gunsmithing is a specific trade. It requires the ability to work on many different guns and do have different skills. I don't think a person should call himself a gunsmith just because he fixes a few types of guns. That is an armorer. An armorer checks and replaces parts on a few specific guns. It is like a person claiming to be a plumber because they can replace a faucet or toilet, or claiming to be an electrician because they can change a light switch or electrical socket.

If you think you are a gunsmith, spend a few hours at Brownells.com looking at the tools and see if you know what each tool is for and how it is used. If you can't then you are not a gunsmith.

I can repair guns and do machining work, but I am not a gunsmith, and I wouldn't insult a gunsmith by claiming I was one.

http://www.nragunsmithing.com/

.

Ernest72
02-04-2015, 17:53
IMHO, you are not a real gunsmith unless you know how to modify parts and make parts from scratch.

I can easily change or upgrade parts on most of my guns. I have started a nice little gunsmithing tool collection, I have reblued entire barrels, refurbished old guns and do some good woodwork. But I am no where near what a professional gunsmith is with years of experience. I do it as a hobby with some trial by error. If I mess up it might cost me some but I am doing it for fun, not a living.