How do you calibrate your dies? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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JDinNC
04-04-2010, 21:12
I just bought the Hornady Lock N Load Classic kit. And, I just ordered the Lee deluxe 4 die set in 45acp. Does it come with instructions? There wasnt much paper work with the press. :headscratch:

PCJim
04-04-2010, 21:38
JD, the die set that you have ordered will have setup instructions included in the set. Read the instructions twice for each die, then set up. I don't use the LNL, but die setup is the same for any press you might be using.

XDRoX
04-04-2010, 21:52
I'm pretty sure that Lee has great instructional videos on their site showing how to adjust their dies.

http://www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1268694702.2574=/html/HelpVideos/video.html

FlyfishermanMike
04-04-2010, 23:24
Lee 45 ACP dies are pretty easy to setup. They will come with detailed instructions and the vids linked below are helpful too. Just crimp enough to remove the flare. Lee's dies use a rubber ring to "lock" them so they can be repeatable. I didn't love them and ordered some of these: Forster Cross Bolt Die Locking Ring 7/8"-14 Thread (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=282628)
They lock horizontally across the threads instead of screwing into and potentially damaging the threads like RCSB dies. They work great and make it easy to keep your die settings. The only down side is I had to cut some notches into my die case to get them to fit as they are bigger than the Lee nuts.

Oh and don't ask any questions about the 4th die, who's name I won't mention...
Do a search and decide for yourself but don't bring it up!

^^ike

kimberguy2004
04-05-2010, 14:51
You mean the LEE FACTORY CRIMP DIE????

PCJim
04-05-2010, 15:01
Oh, crap. You just HAD to mention THAT name.

You KNOW you just opened Pandora's box... Little Stevie will soon be chiming in with his thoughts on the LCD. :tongueout:

kimberguy2004
04-05-2010, 16:01
Oh well, it was far too quiet around here. What's really funny is that the people who get on here and rant about it either way really think that we value their opinion about it. Most of us have our own anyway. At any rate, they rank right up there with "What's the best", "Help me decide", "If you could only have one", "Talk me out of", and "What's in your SHTF bag" threads and after a long day, it's nice to sit back and be entertained. If you've used it and are happy with the results that should be enough. After a lot of careful reading of some of this stuff, I've come to the conclusion that those who rant the most, know the least, but they're happy to take off on some paid advertising garbage that they read in a gun rag, like that is the last authority. Actually, I think the Ayoobites are the funniest.

FlyfishermanMike
04-05-2010, 17:00
Oh boy, here we go. I've read most of "those" threads and there's some good info, if you can wade through all the crap. Most of the issues are people not reading other's posts then arguing about things no one said. Here's the break down of both sides: FCD=useless tool that masks a real problem that should be solved in previous steps. FCD=awesome tool that insures your new round will fire properly. Decide for yourself. I see both sides (imagine that).

^^ike

RustyFN
04-05-2010, 17:07
I was surprised, Lee dies are one of the few things Lee sells that have decent instructions. Should be easy to set up.

Colorado4Wheel
04-05-2010, 17:09
FCD, did I hear FCD??????

Seriously, The dies have instructions. They or ok but not great. Videos are good. Only a couple things I would add.

1) If you have the FCD or a regular taper crimp die you want to make sure the seating die is also not crimping. So take a sized and empty case, raise the ram with the case under the seating die station. Screw the seating down till it touch's the case, raise it at least 1/2 a turn. Lock the die in place. Raise the seating adjustment up. Put a factory round in the station raise the ram, lower the seating adjustment till it touchs the case. Take the case out and raise the adjustment up 1/2 a turn or so. Adjust per instructions after this.
2) Your FCD instructions will give you way too much crimp for lead and plated bullets. They say to add 1/2-1 full turn. Ignore that advice. Take your flared case with a seated bullet. Use your dial caliper as a straight edge on both sides of the case and hold the case with seated bullet up to the light. With your dial calipers you will see the flare created in station #2. Use trial and error to remove a little bit of that flare at a time but remove no more of that flare then needed. As soon as you can see it's gone your done.

dudel
04-05-2010, 19:49
You mean the LEE FACTORY CRIMP DIE????

Lee Factory Crimp Die (FCD) and the Lee Carbide Factory Crimp Die (CFCD) are two totally different things.

http://leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1270518340.5843=/html/catalog/dies-crimp.html

Even for pistol rounds, Lee has two types of crimp dies.

One is the Lee Taper Crimp Die (which is basically the crimp die they put in their pistol sets - or used to).

The second is the Lee Carbide Factory Crimp Die which tends to get panties in a bunch.

Randy from Kansas
04-05-2010, 20:23
I loaded some 45acp rounds today and for the first time I set up and used the Lee Carbide factory crimp die worked very well made a nice even light crimp.

I have been avoiding using them due to it adding another step. I will be using it again

FlyfishermanMike
04-05-2010, 23:50
1) If you have the FCD or a regular taper crimp die you want to make sure the seating die is also not crimping. So take a sized and empty case, raise the ram with the case under the seating die station. Screw the seating down till it touch's the case, raise it at least 1/2 a turn. Lock the die in place. Raise the seating adjustment up. Put a factory round in the station raise the ram, lower the seating adjustment till it touchs the case. Take the case out and raise the adjustment up 1/2 a turn or so. Adjust per instructions after this.


Do you only seat with one die and then just crimp with the FCD? I've been seating and crimping in the same die. What are the disadvantages/advantages?

^^ike

Uncle Don
04-06-2010, 05:07
I loaded some 45acp rounds today and for the first time I set up and used the Lee Carbide factory crimp die worked very well made a nice even light crimp.

I have been avoiding using them due to it adding another step. I will be using it again

Good for you - whether you decide to continue using it or not, do so at your own experience as opposed to others opinions.

Colorado4Wheel
04-06-2010, 07:28
Do you only seat with one die and then just crimp with the FCD? I've been seating and crimping in the same die. What are the disadvantages/advantages?

^^ike

I seat in station 3 and crimp in station 4. No reason or a 4 stage progressive to do it any other way. It's a little more difficult to set it up to seat and crimp at the same time but it's not a huge deal. I don't actually crimp so even after my crimp stage I can reseat the bullet deeper if I wanted to. If you crimp then the seating and crimping at the same time is not as easy to work with.

kcbrown
04-06-2010, 13:58
Do you only seat with one die and then just crimp with the FCD? I've been seating and crimping in the same die. What are the disadvantages/advantages?


If you're loading an auto pistol round that headspaces on the mouth (like 9mm, .40 S&W, .45 ACP), there's no real disadvantage to crimping with the seating die, provided you don't over-crimp.

The purpose of the "crimp" die for those rounds is to remove the flare and nothing more. If the die is set up properly, the inside of the case mouth edge should barely avoid making contact with the bullet when all is said and done, by about 1 thousandth (.001) of an inch on each side (my reasoning is that the brass will have springback and thus removing the flare will push the brass towards the bullet a little more than it would if there were no springback, so you have to account for that when setting the die up).

The reason is that the flare removal operation will be occurring at the same time the bullet is still being pushed into the case, and you want to avoid scoring the bullet with the edge of the case mouth.


A lot depends on the chamber of your gun, but if the case mouth as described above winds up being too wide for your chamber, you probably want to go with a separate flare removal operation, i.e. use the taper crimp die.

I had no problem with seating and flare removal in the same die when I was making 9mm rounds with my Pro 1000, but I was feeding a Glock with them and Glocks eat just about anything.

dudel
04-06-2010, 17:29
I loaded some 45acp rounds today and for the first time I set up and used the Lee Carbide factory crimp die worked very well made a nice even light crimp.

I have been avoiding using them due to it adding another step. I will be using it again


Good for you for taking the time to try it and make up your own mind.

dudel
04-06-2010, 17:33
Do you only seat with one die and then just crimp with the FCD? I've been seating and crimping in the same die. What are the disadvantages/advantages?

^^ike

The adjustments are easier to make in that one does seating depth, the other does crimp. If you mount them in a tool head, it allows you to switch projectile profiles without affecting the crimp. Even if you use a single stage press, you get this advantage if you lock down the lock rings. Lets you get down to COL easier without having to mess with the crimp. Experienced loaders will also tell you you get a more accurate round when it's done in two step.

Keep in mind that when you are seating and crimping at the same time, the last bit of seating is done as the last bit of crimp is being applied. Not always the best conditions for FMJ; certainly not good for plated or lead.

FlyfishermanMike
04-06-2010, 17:39
That makes perfect sense. I'll try separating the two steps and see how it goes. Thanks,

^^ike