Ever get to deal with spectacular weather? [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Ever get to deal with spectacular weather?


Kadetklapp
04-06-2010, 13:35
For some reason, it has become sort of the responsibility of law enforcement in the midwest to deal with nasty weather from time to time as the need arises. We often get paged (like yesterday) to go out and not really watch, the weather, but more or less deal with it's aftermath.

That being said, anyone here got an good stories or cool pictures to share? Bad weather season is just getting started in my part of the world. We narrowly avoided a tornado-warned storm last evening.

CAcop
04-06-2010, 14:35
Dude I work in what is described as a Mediterranean climate. The weather is usually somewhere between 40 and 80 all year round. It rains from time to time between Nov to May. Meterolgically speaking we are dull and boring.

I have to go to Hawaii to find better weather.

CanIhaveGasCash
04-06-2010, 15:30
It snowed mud last night... now my truck is really dirty.

PTRJason
04-06-2010, 15:33
For some reason, it has become sort of the responsibility of law enforcement in the midwest to deal with nasty weather from time to time as the need arises. We often get paged (like yesterday) to go out and not really watch, the weather, but more or less deal with it's aftermath.

That being said, anyone here got an good stories or cool pictures to share? Bad weather season is just getting started in my part of the world. We narrowly avoided a tornado-warned storm last evening.


Where at in Indiana? I lived in Porter County (NWI), and was a firefighter there as well as in Lake County, yeah we would get toned out for Tornado watch and alerts.

PTRJason
04-06-2010, 15:38
Dude I work in what is described as a Mediterranean climate. The weather is usually somewhere between 40 and 80 all year round. It rains from time to time between Nov to May. Meterolgically speaking we are dull and boring.

I have to go to Hawaii to find better weather.


One thing I love about Cali, different areas of the state, even if 50 miles apart the weather changes drastically. I live in Riverside County, desert area, but right now it can be 70 day, and 30 night. I can drive 50 miles to the beach and it will be 60 day and 50 night. Or 50 miles the other way to the mountains and it will be 40 day and 20 nights. And that will all be in the same exact day.

Where I live it is gets between 25 lows in winter to 115 in summer.

Bruce M
04-06-2010, 15:49
Would something like say Hurricane Andrew count? I remember one guy coming back with only three doors - he had opened the driver's door to his crusier when it was facing the wrong way. I was hunkered down during the worst of the actual storm. I also remember working twelve hour days from the storm until about Thanksgiving. Eventually in October we started getting a day off every week. That felt awfully good.

Kadetklapp
04-06-2010, 17:44
Would something like say Hurricane Andrew count? I remember one guy coming back with only three doors - he had opened the driver's door to his crusier when it was facing the wrong way. I was hunkered down during the worst of the actual storm. I also remember working twelve hour days from the storm until about Thanksgiving. Eventually in October we started getting a day off every week. That felt awfully good.

Oh absolutely. You guys on the gulf have it bad since you get DAYS of the stuff, and we usually get six hours or so of bad weather :whistling:

Cochese
04-06-2010, 18:12
I've been through a few blizzards here in CO. I also worked police/security/babysitter during Katrina.

JBaird22
04-06-2010, 18:45
I was supposed to work this last Sunday but was hunkered down at my in-laws just outside of cell phone range.

I asked my FTO when I first came to Missouri what we do when we are working during his tornado. His response, "I don't know." Its number 32 why I want to get out of here.

DaBigBR
04-06-2010, 23:46
Watched a tornado pass within less than a mile of where I was and within a couple hundred yards of where I had been a minute or so before in 2006. Our town was spared, but the city that surrounds us was not. Spent the night helping them cover the looting calls. It brought EVERYONE out to "look." Took quite a while to get things back to normal.

Summer of 2008 our county had major flooding. Once again, our town was spared, which meant that we got the majority of the traffic in to the area.

We've also seen significant ice storms that have resulted in major power outages and road closures, but thoe two times that that has happened things have been back to normal pretty quickly.

We're looking at possible flooding again this summer.

ateamer
04-07-2010, 00:01
Dude I work in what is described as a Mediterranean climate. The weather is usually somewhere between 40 and 80 all year round. It rains from time to time between Nov to May. Meterolgically speaking we are dull and boring.

I have to go to Hawaii to find better weather.
Yep. Four years ago, it snowed a couple inches here (even on the beach) and there was mayhem. Crashes everywhere. The smart patrol officers, those who didn't have to respond to calls that required immediate presence, pulled over and parked with everyone else. No snow tires, no chains, no traction. I had to park my truck at the top of our street and walk a the last three hundred yards. Downhill all the way, just snow and slush, street tires on the truck and two wheel drive only, would've just wrecked our brand-new garage door.


Even thunderstorms are rare here - we get one or two a year at the most. Anything more than that takes some unusual weather patterns for this area.

September and October have some of the best weather of the year. Usually hot days, crystal clear, very little of the fog/overcast that creeps in during the night and stays until noon, and no tourists.

lawman800
04-07-2010, 01:23
I work pretty far inland and live closer to the beach areas so the temperature between where I work and where I live can differ by 10-15F. Also, there is one hill that separates the different counties and one side can be sunny while the other side is rainy and vice versa.

I've worked a storm that cut all power to the city and we had to man every major intersection to make sure we don't have accidents everywhere. It was cold and the streets were full of stuff blown everywhere.

Had to work the Grand Prix fires. Ash was falling nonstop and we had to wear those masks. All the units were covered in ash and the vents were shut off because all it did was blow ash all over the interior. At night, the surrounding mountains were lit up in orange rings around us. Ambers falling around lit a few residences too and had to assist the FD with those calls.

GasTiresOil
04-07-2010, 07:34
IDK if any of you have seen in the news the flooding in the northeast recently. I got called in during the storm and got set up on a traffic post in the driving rain. I watched as the little stream turned into a raging river and washed a road out right in front of me.

It was a total mess all over. several bridges were completely washed away, roads were under several feet of water. Its worse in some other parts too. Its mostly back to normal where I am, several towns over still have bridge closures, rte 1 is closed. 95 was closed until a few days ago.

jpa
04-07-2010, 08:08
The NWS came in and taught a weather spotter class for all our dispatchers and officers and the FD where I used to work in the Chicago burbs. We had a weather radio in dispatch and when it went off we had a few weather bug officers who would drive out to the top of the parking garage at the mall to see where the storm was. I set off the tornado sirens at least a few times while working there.

JJS
04-07-2010, 09:34
Worked the '97 Jarrell tornado in the recovery of bodies (body parts).Have some pics somewhere in the attic of a house along with its foundation plus about 7" of earth ripped outta the ground.Home was almost intact and a couple hundred yards down the road.

SPDSNYPR
04-07-2010, 09:48
I live in Oklahoma, and have had to babysit areas that were wiped off the map from Tornados. Oddly enough, the biggest problem we had was people trying to get into the area to take pictures. Some traveled across the country to get pics - but we told them to go away. They were furious. I got over their anger almost immediately.

Always heavy storms - always a tornado warning - but really most tornados don't hit populated areas and do a lot of damage. Now I jinxed myself.

Kadetklapp
04-07-2010, 09:52
I worked one night when we got hit by a foul supercell. This was a couple years ago when I worked part time for that small town/lake/resort nearby. We rolled around in a huge 2000 Expedition with an even huger lightbar on top. I was running signal 10 (code) to the lake and campground to get people under cover. The power was out and the tornado siren was not working (they wouldn't have heard it anyway). I remember crossing the causeway over the lake to the campground and seeing three foot waves crashing across the pavement. I was pretty sure I was going to get rolled into the water. I was doing about 35 mph with the siren on and couldn't even hear it over the rain and wind pounding my truck.

JTipper.45
04-07-2010, 10:07
I still think that Louisiana is the weather mecca of the US. I've worked through hurricanes Rita, Gustav, Ike and a few minor ones I can't even remember their names.If working through them isn't bad enough you have to keep track of evacuees coming through from ALL over, then having to work the shelters is real fun. Then we are at the southern most tip of Tornado Alley so we get lots of small F1's. These are just enough to cover the roads in debris and trees to make getting anywhere just about impossible. Then you have the situation where souther air from the Gulf comes up and hits the dry air from the plains and we get super storms with what seems like a foot of rainfall at a time. Last summer we hit a record 117 degrees with 100% humidity (that is just miserable). Top that this winter with 4 snowfalls (unheard of in this area). So I have become a weather fanatic with no less than 10 weather tracking websites on my laptop. I'll look for a few pics tonight.

Patchman
04-08-2010, 13:45
We have some LEOs who feel that during inclement weather, it's OK for those who live furthest away to take off because those who live closer by can go into work.

Other than that gripe, I think it is one of LE's (along with fire dept, National Guards & FEMA) jobs to be available to assist afterwards. Learned early on that when the forecast is for serious "Oh ****" weather, accept the fact that no, you can't be home with the wife and kids.

All that more important for them to be able survive on their own. In every way imaginable.

AngryBassets
04-08-2010, 15:34
I worked midnites this past winter during three 24" snowfalls.

We get some nasty thunderstorms once or twice a week in the summer. Once or twice a summer, we get a real doozy with trees down/power (and traffic signal) outages.

Summer 08 I posted this:

http://i304.photobucket.com/albums/nn192/TacticalFats/0610081601.jpg
With 40000% humidity.


It hit 90* yesterday. The normal high is in the mid 60's.

`Yeah..NJ is a paradise.

txleapd
04-08-2010, 18:24
I've got a picture of a sweet snowman some local hosedraggers made in front of their fire station. It rarely snows on Central Texas, so that kinda made it a significant event.

Of course, our patrol guys were slammed working collisions due to the ice on the roads, but at least the firefighters had time to play on the snow...

rookie1
04-08-2010, 18:46
Speaking of snowmen. I wish I would have taken pictures of some of the snowmen the college students make. Very entertaining.

AngryBassets
04-08-2010, 19:22
Working in the snow sucks. 2" or 2', it doesn't matter. As a wee-lad of 22, the 30" blizzard we got here in 1995 sucked, regardless how much my gung-ho self tried to convince myself otherwise.

The three 2+foot blizzards I worked this year really sucked.

At least I can conduct stationary patrols in the community college parking lot or outside the mall a whole lot of observing (and a little tiny bit of protecting) when it's hot.

Kahr_Glockman
04-08-2010, 20:43
I lived on the border and worked there up until two years ago. The day before the tornado hit Eagle Pass, I was getting ready for work and it got real still. I told my wife that this was not good and decided to go in about 30 minutes early. I turned on the radio and heard the FD het toned out for a grass fire on the Rio Grande. The cause wad reported as a lightning strike. One ofthe other deputies was tied up with a call so I started that direction.

I listened the FD and they started screaming into the radio that there was a tornado in the river. They then said that they couldn't see it any more. I crested a small hill and saw the tornado right on top of where the fire guys were supposed to be. I saw that sucker go right up into the clouds right over the south of town. I didn't see it bur the tornado touched down on the other side of town and knocked down 23 power poles and destroyed three mobile homes.

After the tornado passed by where I was there was torrental rain to the point that the wipers on my crown Vic couldn't keep up. There was minor hail but the rain was unreal.

The next day an F3 hit Eagle Pass and we went to help with SAR.

m2hmghb
04-08-2010, 22:34
I worked midnites this past winter during three 24" snowfalls.

We get some nasty thunderstorms once or twice a week in the summer. Once or twice a summer, we get a real doozy with trees down/power (and traffic signal) outages.

Summer 08 I posted this:

http://i304.photobucket.com/albums/nn192/TacticalFats/0610081601.jpg
With 40000% humidity.


It hit 90* yesterday. The normal high is in the mid 60's.

`Yeah..NJ is a paradise.

Was wondering when you'd post about the weather. Didn't you hear, the devil is prepping us for the next wave of political BS. Man it was hotter here from Sunday on then it was in Death Valley.


Just saw the thing about the 95 blizzard, yea that was a brutal one. School was out for over a week, there were no bus stops because the snow was piled on the corners. I shoveled out 4 drive ways that time. Hell I shoveled out 3 drive ways through each blizzard this year.

pgg00
04-09-2010, 03:17
Dude I work in what is described as a Mediterranean climate. The weather is usually somewhere between 40 and 80 all year round. It rains from time to time between Nov to May. Meterolgically speaking we are dull and boring.

I have to go to Hawaii to find better weather.

One thing I love about Cali, different areas of the state, even if 50 miles apart the weather changes drastically. I live in Riverside County, desert area, but right now it can be 70 day, and 30 night. I can drive 50 miles to the beach and it will be 60 day and 50 night. Or 50 miles the other way to the mountains and it will be 40 day and 20 nights. And that will all be in the same exact day.

Where I live it is gets between 25 lows in winter to 115 in summer.

Yep. Four years ago, it snowed a couple inches here (even on the beach) and there was mayhem. Crashes everywhere. The smart patrol officers, those who didn't have to respond to calls that required immediate presence, pulled over and parked with everyone else. No snow tires, no chains, no traction. I had to park my truck at the top of our street and walk a the last three hundred yards. Downhill all the way, just snow and slush, street tires on the truck and two wheel drive only, would've just wrecked our brand-new garage door.


Even thunderstorms are rare here - we get one or two a year at the most. Anything more than that takes some unusual weather patterns for this area.

September and October have some of the best weather of the year. Usually hot days, crystal clear, very little of the fog/overcast that creeps in during the night and stays until noon, and no tourists.

Just a few days ago we had a couple inches of snow near my house. The next town up had about 6 inches. All this is Sunny CA :supergrin:

Gulfcop
04-09-2010, 11:41
Hurricane Ike was a fun party, to say the least.........

JTipper.45
04-10-2010, 22:26
Here's a few pics of the fun in 2008...thankfully we had NONE in 2009.

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0173.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0172.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0165.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0164.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0162.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0163.jpg

Hack
04-11-2010, 07:04
I don't have pictures, since having a camera is against the policy in a tower. But, there is nothing like being in a perimeter tower in a lightening storm and watching sparks fly inside with you.

Malstorme
04-11-2010, 09:02
In 1999, we had a tornadic storm system come through. There had been some touch down to the south and west of us and the storm was headed directly for us. One of the local nursing homes was working on getting their residents out of their rooms and into the hallways in the center of the building. They'd requested assistance and 2 of us were assigned the call.

We arrived and they had about 3 employees trying to move a bunch of residents, many of whom were bedridden into the halls. While moving some folks in, the storm sirens started sounding and I could hear LOUD noises coming from a nearby door on the west end of the building. I'm not native to Oklahoma, so this was my first good storm and I'd never seen a tornado before. I went to the door to see what I could.

I hit the door handle to get a better look and the door was sucked open out of my hands. The trees were whipping around outside like I'd never seen, even during hurricane season while living in NC. I grabbed the door but didn't stand a chance pulling against it, so I had to step out and push to get it closed.

It was dark as could be out, so I didn't get to see much except the trees whipping. I got the door closed and went around the front of the home and got back inside. Probably not my best tactical planning ever, but I was young, dumb, inexperienced and was woefully under-informed about what happens around tornados.

The radio soon started chirping about reports of a tornado touching down, just north and west of my location. About 10 houses or so were destroyed, then it lifted and touched down on the other side of town taking out some trailers/RVs etc.

Using Google Earth to measure the distance between where I was and where the houses were destroyed shows .24 miles, or about 1300 feet. I still haven't "seen" a tornado, but I've been awfully close to one. It was "only" an F0/1 as opposed to something bigger, but it was still whipping up pretty good.

I consider myself pretty lucky that I didn't get myself hurt or worse. Someone was looking out for me. :angel:

Mals

ClydeG19
04-11-2010, 09:58
Back when I was a firefighter, I worked the results of a tornado and flooding after hurricane Isabel. I wish I had a camera for the tornado...I remember there was nothing left of one house but the foundation and a toilet. For the flooding, we were trying to evacuate people, but it was amazing how many people didn't want to leave.

lawman800
04-11-2010, 12:18
Just a few days ago we had a couple inches of snow near my house. The next town up had about 6 inches. All this is Sunny CA :supergrin:

I am very saddened that you didn't quote the one CA copper that has to suffer through LA weather... I mean, it's like 50F outside right now. WTH? I want to ride my Harley! It's APRIL!

!@#$%

Kadetklapp
04-12-2010, 07:41
I remember this one. My dad ended up on this scene and was on the front page of the paper with his butt in the air while he was cutting up huge piles of insulation on top of the rubble.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linnsburg,_Indiana

He said it was the weirdest thing. When the found the first two bodies (another man died later at the hospital from a different home) they were as if they never woke, but they were like "bags of broken glass" he said.

lawman800
04-12-2010, 07:46
Well, the skies opened up yesterday and it rained all night... sideways too and there is not a spot in my backyard that is dry... and I have half of it covered too with awnings and an enclosure even. I feel for the guys who were out in the soup last night.

I think it rained straight for about 3 hours that way.

PTRJason
04-12-2010, 12:56
Well, the skies opened up yesterday and it rained all night... sideways too and there is not a spot in my backyard that is dry... and I have half of it covered too with awnings and an enclosure even. I feel for the guys who were out in the soup last night.

I think it rained straight for about 3 hours that way.


I was out in it all last night from 1900-0500 and now back at work in it from 1000-1800 at least it is light rain now. And I am in the same area it was fun drive around Rancho and Ontario last night. Freeways were flooded.

lawman800
04-12-2010, 19:37
I feel for ya.

Kadetklapp
06-07-2010, 06:43
Looks like these guys had their hands full the other night-
http://www.fox8.com/news/wjw-three-killed-wood-county-tornado-txt,0,2101138.story
MILLBURY, Ohio -- - The National Weather Service now says the tornado that killed seven people in northwest Ohio over the weekend had winds of up to 165 mph, was up to 300 yards wide and may have traveled 10 miles.

The National Weather Service in Cleveland said Monday the tornado was by far the most severe of four confirmed tornadoes that hit northern Ohio on Saturday.

Fox 8 Meteorologist Scott Sabol says investigators could upgrade the storm, after getting a closer look at the storm's path and the damage it left behind.

The deadly tornado destroyed at least 50 homes and left another 50 severely damaged.

Particularly hard hit were Lake Township and the community of Millbury, about 10 miles southeast of Toledo.

Lake Township Police Chief Mark Hummer planned to hold a news conference Monday morning on the casualties and cleanup.

Among the people killed, was a mother who had gone to the police department with her husband and baby to seek shelter, according to Chief Hummer.

Hummer said the woman handed her baby off to a police officer right before the tornado hit. The woman's husband, baby and the police officer made it inside safely. The woman did not, and was swept away by the tornado. Another woman was killed while driving on Route 795.

Earlier, only five had been confirmed dead. Chief Hummer said the other two people died at area hospitals on Sunday. Circumstances surrounding the other deaths were not immediately known.

A deputy from the Wood County Sheriff's Office confirmed the identities of the following people who perished as a result of the severe weather:

Mary Walters, 36, of Millbury, Ohio; Hayden Walters, 5, son of Mary Walters; Kathleen Hammitt, 56, of Wauseon, Ohio; Bailey Bowman, 20, of Walbridge, Ohio; Ted Kranz, 46, of Millbury, Ohio.

More than 30 people were taken to hospitals in the Toledo area, Mercy Hospital System spokesperson Gloria Enk told Fox 8 News.

As of Sunday afternoon, at least 17 people remain hospitalized. Four people, including two children, are in critical condition.

Meanwhile, authorities say all residents are accounted for after thorough searches of nearly all of the buildings and homes in Millbury. Some roadways have also been reopened.

The tornado hit shortly after 11 p.m. Saturday night. Residents said they felt their homes "shaking" and rushed to seek shelter.

The National Weather Service reported that as many as seven tornadoes touched down in Northwest Ohio Saturday night and Sunday morning.

In addition to the fatalities, the devastation left by the tornado is significant. The Lake Township Administration and Dispatch Center was leveled. The Lake High School gymnasium, where graduation was to be held Sunday, was heavily damaged. Hummer says at least 50 homes were destroyed and another 50 were badly damaged. *VIEW PICTURES OF DAMAGE HERE*

Public safety departments from all over Northwest Ohio have responded to assist. The Wood County Sheriff's Office is dispatching for the Lake Township Police Department -- which was in the administration building that was destroyed. The Ohio State Highway Patrol Wood County Post says it is also helping to field calls for Lake Township.

An aerial search was executed Sunday morning to retrace the path of the storm. The air-search was necessary to make sure residents were accounted for, Hummer said.

Hummer says despite the devastation, the city will overcome the hardships.
http://www.fox8.com/media/photo/2010-06/54139378.jpg
http://www.fox8.com/media/photo/2010-06/54140041.jpg
http://www.fox8.com/media/photo/2010-06/54140569.jpg

JTipper.45
06-07-2010, 08:13
:wow: Lord, that is bad.... June 1 started the official hurricane season. We were told that they are predicting an "above average" number of storms. We are just far enough north that the evacuation line is just a few miles south but with even small hurricanes we get handfulls of small tornados. Nothing like above, but just enough to cause lots of power failures for days, property damage reports out the butt and driving around all night long trying to prevent looting. I still have nightmares of having to live out of my unit for a week after Rita.

JTipper.45
06-07-2010, 14:03
Well, I had to talk about bad weather. We are getting our butts handed to us this afternoon. Thunderstorm after thunderstorm lined up and the lightning is unreal. It's like some disaster movie off of the Syfy Channel! We've had a few micro bursts to the west putting trees down on the roadways. Just a lovely way to start the summer off.

trdvet
06-07-2010, 14:56
From time to time we will have severe weather. Perfect opportunity to practice what we call on my shift, "fleet safety."

Which means park your car in a safe spot until you get something major. Wrecking a car whether or not it's your fault is guaranteed to get you to the Chief's office.

FM12
06-08-2010, 00:08
Yep, hurricane and tornado aftermath.

vanilla_gorilla
06-08-2010, 00:36
:wow: Lord, that is bad.... June 1 started the official hurricane season. We were told that they are predicting an "above average" number of storms. We are just far enough north that the evacuation line is just a few miles south but with even small hurricanes we get handfulls of small tornados. Nothing like above, but just enough to cause lots of power failures for days, property damage reports out the butt and driving around all night long trying to prevent looting. I still have nightmares of having to live out of my unit for a week after Rita.

You better get comfortable with it. Our dispatch weatherbug tells me that the Gulf is already at record temperatures, which means stronger hurricanes. I'm expecting a lot of nasty stuff this year.

In a similar vein, I love people who are new to the state. This time of year, they keep asking, "What's the weather supposed to be like today?" :rofl:

"Well, ma'am, it's most likely going to get hot in the morning, then hotter in the afternoon, until it rains around 3:00 or 4:00, then instead of hot, it's going to be hot and steamy. Guess what? I bet it'll be the same tomorrow, just like it has been every day for the past friggin' month."

Ryobi
06-08-2010, 19:38
Katrina. Nashville flood. Not a scratch. Then last week, a tree falls on my truck in a mild thunderstorm. Lord.

Bullman
06-09-2010, 03:43
As a couple of fellow Oklahomans have already posted, I won't add much to that from when I worked there, other than I am now quite pleased that I don't have to worry about clouds sucking me up and spitting me out in Kansas. Now that I am in SW Virginia I find the weather much more agreeable, we did have a pretty good blizzard this winter that shut down the interstate for a little while and stranded some folks, but that didn't last long.

CJStudent
06-09-2010, 12:14
I still think that Louisiana is the weather mecca of the US. I've worked through hurricanes Rita, Gustav, Ike and a few minor ones I can't even remember their names.If working through them isn't bad enough you have to keep track of evacuees coming through from ALL over, then having to work the shelters is real fun. Then we are at the southern most tip of Tornado Alley so we get lots of small F1's. These are just enough to cover the roads in debris and trees to make getting anywhere just about impossible. Then you have the situation where souther air from the Gulf comes up and hits the dry air from the plains and we get super storms with what seems like a foot of rainfall at a time. Last summer we hit a record 117 degrees with 100% humidity (that is just miserable). Top that this winter with 4 snowfalls (unheard of in this area). So I have become a weather fanatic with no less than 10 weather tracking websites on my laptop. I'll look for a few pics tonight.

What part of LA? I was down in the Baton Rouge area after Gustav with the Guard. We got back just in time to drive through the windstorm that was what remained of Ike (80 MPH winds with as clear a sky as could be) to get back home. My car was all over every lane of the interstate that day trying to make it home; I had no idea it was coming through then.

CJStudent
06-09-2010, 12:16
Here's a few pics of the fun in 2008...thankfully we had NONE in 2009.

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0173.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0172.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0165.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0164.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0162.jpg

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj143/JTipper/Hurricane%20season%202008/IMG_0163.jpg

That looks awfully familiar, lol. I remember driving through that mess as it went through in a tour bus on my way down there. Fun times indeed!

Kadetklapp
06-22-2010, 08:46
Well we got our asses handed to us last night. Thankfully, I wasn't on-duty, and they didn't call me in, which was surprising, but I had my hands full at home. Storm blew in about 2200 hours, tornado-warned (NWS is tornado warning a lot of storms lately, must have changed the criterea), and we sat on the patio and watched lightning for a few minutes. When it clearly was headed our way we battened down the hatches and almost immediately lost power. Fired up my ChiCom generator to run the sump pump and my downstairs radio/scanner board and ended up spending most of the night in the basement. Sump couldn't keep up, completely flooded the basement. Not good.

Local SO and PD was inundated with calls to the point where dispatch declared an emergency and called for Signal 100. Two house fires due to either lightning or down power lines.

Got three hours of sleep and am on duty now. Not a very happy piggy.

AngryBassets
07-06-2010, 14:51
Apparently, that bank thermometer I posted from a year or so ago wasn't accurate. News just said it hasn't been this hot since 1988--22 years ago.
http://i304.photobucket.com/albums/nn192/TacticalFats/Forum/IMG00043-20100706-1601.jpg

I did active shooter training today, 0700-1130. I called it off early since we were in an un airconditioned school and there's no point in teaching when no one's capable of paying attention.

I work tonite, 2300-0700, then have to do training again; gonna be 100* tomorrow again. And HUMID.

JTipper.45
07-07-2010, 10:49
Well, we went through our first tropical depression of the season yesterday. When the rain started I looked on the radar and it had a little rotation to it just like a hurricane. We went through periods of heavy rain, sunshine and then more rain. I was having flashbacks! I'm afraid this is gonna be a busy season. Good luck to everyone else along the Gulf region...hope you manage to stay dry!

Kadetklapp
10-26-2010, 06:39
Well, here it is October 26th and NWS just put my county under a Tornado Warning....

Indiana weather is so freaking weird.

Locking the courthouse down now...

CJStudent
10-27-2010, 21:06
Well, here it is October 26th and NWS just put my county under a Tornado Warning....

Indiana weather is so freaking weird.

Locking the courthouse down now...

Watched a funnel cloud start to form at my Guard armory yesterday; about 150 yards away! :shocked:

Luckily, it dissipated pretty quickly. Still made me check my drawers afterwards, though.

Kadetklapp
05-25-2011, 07:26
Ya'll in the midwest/south alive? Saw on the news a lot of LE buildings took some hits.

nitesite10mm
05-25-2011, 07:50
An EF-5 one-mile wide tore thru my county a month ago and caused tremendous carnage and deaths. Whole towns and communities and neighborhoods gone. Looked like every single thing above dirt level went thru a wood chipper and got strewn all over the landscape. Winds above 210-mph pulverize everything.

I feel for the Joplin, MO area. Our populace wasn't as concentrated as theirs but the tornados were exactly alike. 140 people died in North Alabama during that one night. 8000 homes are gone. It's just horrible what is left behind.

I never took a single photo of the aftermath here out of respect for the dead and their survivors, the injured, and the forlorn homeless.

I worked the Huntsville, AL tornado of Nov 1989 and was on scene within minutes. The carnage there was real bad, and while the temp before was in the 60s it began to snow afterward. Made the half-naked survivors waiting for help struggle all the more to just survive.

Hack
05-25-2011, 07:54
It's been interesting even for here. No tornadoes in town for which I am thankful. Joplin took a real big hit on this, and had a little more to deal with besides that one.

Kadetklapp
05-25-2011, 09:00
Our dispatchers have been putting out broadcasts here all morning from NWS. Canceling our monthly extend-test due to threat of severe weather. Don't want any confusion I guess.

Big House
05-25-2011, 09:32
Two officers were struck by lightening in Joplin, MO. Both have survived, with one in serious condition.

Hack
05-25-2011, 15:26
Well, Sedalia, MO got hit today. It came close to my mother's house. Thank God she is OK.

Patchman
05-25-2011, 20:12
Two officers were struck by lightening in Joplin, MO. Both have survived, with one in serious condition.

Geez!

And to think I was complaining about the two weeks of rain we got here which ruined the crop of sunflower seeds I planted. :embarassed:

Hopes and prayers to all the LEOs and their families who live and/or work in those areas hit by the latest spectacular weather.

Kadetklapp
05-25-2011, 20:26
We are getting whooped right now. Hanging out in the war room with the wife unit and my GSD. He's asleep on the floor. She's freaking out.

RF7126
05-26-2011, 11:25
We are getting whooped right now. Hanging out in the war room with the wife unit and my GSD. He's asleep on the floor. She's freaking out.

How'd you guys do? The town I work in got hit and lost power (power is still out there) but no one killed or much severe damage.

Kadetklapp
05-26-2011, 14:59
How'd you guys do? The town I work in got hit and lost power (power is still out there) but no one killed or much severe damage.

We weathered it in trim Hoosier style. No damage here, unlike five weeks ago when a lot of roofs, sheds, and the like got blown to hell and gone. Lebanon lost some roofs and Colfax got absolutely raped by straightline winds. In fact, my AO is directly southwest of there, and I saw and reported a large wall cloud heading that direction. Probably where the wind pushed from.

Anyway, in typical nerd fashion, I manned my ham radio and reported in on the NWS nets most of the evening from 1700 to about midnight. If I had my take-home car, I would have rolled around in it but it's not my turn this month.

RF7126
05-30-2011, 12:00
We weathered it in trim Hoosier style. No damage here, unlike five weeks ago when a lot of roofs, sheds, and the like got blown to hell and gone. Lebanon lost some roofs and Colfax got absolutely raped by straightline winds. In fact, my AO is directly southwest of there, and I saw and reported a large wall cloud heading that direction. Probably where the wind pushed from.

Anyway, in typical nerd fashion, I manned my ham radio and reported in on the NWS nets most of the evening from 1700 to about midnight. If I had my take-home car, I would have rolled around in it but it's not my turn this month.

I'm glad to hear you guys made out alright. We had a lot of talk of a couple of tornados in our area with some damaged areas but I think it was more the winds that you mentioned.

relayman
05-30-2011, 12:08
I work for a power company and deal with the weather every day , good or bad . This part of South Louisiana ranges from the teens to nearly one hundred degrees . So does the humidity . Throw in a Hurricane or an ice storm , and I'm ready to move somewhere else at times . Retirement will help , but that's still ten years away .

OldCurlyWolf
05-31-2011, 07:30
For some reason, it has become sort of the responsibility of law enforcement in the midwest to deal with nasty weather from time to time as the need arises. We often get paged (like yesterday) to go out and not really watch, the weather, but more or less deal with it's aftermath.

That being said, anyone here got an good stories or cool pictures to share? Bad weather season is just getting started in my part of the world. We narrowly avoided a tornado-warned storm last evening.

I grew up and still live in Tornado Alley. As far back as I can remember(pre-grade school and over 50 years) what you are describing along with going out southwest of town and looking for the tornadoes (acting as a EWS) has always been part of the duties of a small to medium size town PD.:wavey:

RMolina628
05-31-2011, 14:34
Sunday we had a tornado touch down about three miles away and do some damage. We lost power till late yesterday, and now NWS just issued another thunderstorm watch for the area till midnight EDT. I am at school today and my next class is on the 4th floor and it looks like we will be in session for the action.

x_out86
05-31-2011, 23:51
Working in Wisconsin I dont have the time or energy to recall all of the "interesting/spectacular weather" that we deal with.

Anybody from wisconsin knows that there are only 2 seasons here....Winter and Construction.

Last week we dealt with frost at night and temps down to the mid 20's. Yesterday it was 92 during the afternoon....Welcome to Wisconsin.

Oh yeah and last month we had snow coming down while thunder and lightning flashed and crashed. It was odd even for Wisconsin weather.

Bullman
06-01-2011, 02:09
I grew up and still live in Tornado Alley. As far back as I can remember(pre-grade school and over 50 years) what you are describing along with going out southwest of town and looking for the tornadoes (acting as a EWS) has always been part of the duties of a small to medium size town PD.:wavey:

I worked for a medium size town PD in western Oklahoma for 17 years before I moved to Virginia, I thought I had given up storm spotting when I moved. We have had a tornado this year destroy a town 30 miles on either side of us this year, very unusual for the mountains.

Kadetklapp
06-01-2011, 07:01
I worked for a medium size town PD in western Oklahoma for 17 years before I moved to Virginia, I thought I had given up storm spotting when I moved. We have had a tornado this year destroy a town 30 miles on either side of us this year, very unusual for the mountains.

The mountains have been getting whooped this year. I drove north from Florida the day before the Tuscaloosa tornado and we hit nasty weather then.

I'll be honest, I find storm spotting to be one of the more "fun" activities in LE work simply because there is little to no paperwork and it gets the blood pumping especially if you've had a slow week.

Obviously I hate it that people get killed or injured by these things, but just the same weather has always amazed me. It's like God's CTL+ALT+DEL for trailer parks it seems....