Drilling holes in the end of a shotgun barrrell.. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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BSA70
04-07-2010, 08:20
I see different pictures floating around where folks have drilled various holes in the end of a HD shotgun barrel.

What purpose is this? What is it called? Is there a certain pattern to go by?

Thanks

cmslone
04-07-2010, 08:30
Porting. It's supposed to reduce barrel jump. I've never shot one ported, so I can't offer an opinion on that.

vafish
04-07-2010, 09:22
I have a ported 28" barrel on my Mossberg 500, my son has a non-ported barrel on his. I don't think the reduction in recoil is that huge of a deal. The ported barrel does sound louder and different.

dosei
04-07-2010, 09:54
My .02,
Porting is for competition guns, not defensive guns. Porting diverts burning gases up (into you sight picture) in an effort to reduce muzzle rise. This generally makes the gunshot sound louder to the person firing it (read "increases the deafening effect to the user"). It also exposes the shooters eyes to a much brighter muzzle flash (burning gases diverted up into shooter sight picture instead of forward) which in low light conditions can result in the shooters eyes dilating (read "temporary blindness). Generally speaking, the time it takes for you eyes to recover from the more intense muzzle flash is much greater than the reduction in muzzle rise...so while you may have the gun back on target, your eyes still can't see if you do because of the temporary "flash blindness". When your shooting competitively you always have ear protection and lighting is always good, so a comp'ed gun gives you a slight edge. But in a defensive situation they can quickly become a disadvantage.

WUSSCVR
04-07-2010, 10:09
My .02,
Porting is for competition guns, not defensive guns. Porting diverts burning gases up (into you sight picture) in an effort to reduce muzzle rise. This generally makes the gunshot sound louder to the person firing it (read "increases the deafening effect to the user"). It also exposes the shooters eyes to a much brighter muzzle flash (burning gases diverted up into shooter sight picture instead of forward) which in low light conditions can result in the shooters eyes dilating (read "temporary blindness). Generally speaking, the time it takes for you eyes to recover from the more intense muzzle flash is much greater than the reduction in muzzle rise...so while you may have the gun back on target, your eyes still can't see if you do because of the temporary "flash blindness". When your shooting competitively you always have ear protection and lighting is always good, so a comp'ed gun gives you a slight edge. But in a defensive situation they can quickly become a disadvantage.

Out of curiosity, do you actually own (and have fired in the dark) any ported firearms? I only ask because you are regurgitating the BS that has floated around the internet for some time now regarding ported firearms.

I actually own a few ported guns and I carry a G23C (ported) everyday. A while back I decided to try and eliminate all the miss information regarding the dreaded "blinding flash" that was here on GT by shooting a little video. I used my G23C with three different types of ammo and fired it in a dark range.

http://s172.photobucket.com/albums/w21/kmkviper/G23/?action=view&current=P1010658.flv

The first string of five rounds is cheap Blazer ammo that flashes a lot.
The second string is Hornady TAP FPD ammo that is designed for a very small flash.
The third string is Speer Gold Dot carry ammo.

As you can see, with good carry ammo, the flash is minimal. It is also so quick that your eyes do not register "the blinding flash" and they don't dilate.

As for shotguns I cant really say but the holes are probably used to reduce muzzle climb. I am much faster with double taps coming out of my ported G23C than a regular G23, though I doubt you would need to double tap with a shotgun!

dosei
04-07-2010, 10:38
Out of curiosity, do you actually own (and have fired in the dark) any ported firearms?

Own? No, I do not own any.

Fired in dark? Yes, I have fired:
Comp'ed 1911 (45acp)
Several ported 357's
Glock 17C
S&W 500 (4" barrel)

Yes, I personally noticed a significant increase in flash and slightly slower split times when firing comp'ed guns in low light vs. identical non-comped guns in low light (with the exception of the S&W 500, which had beastly recoil without the comp).

YMMV...

Spen84107
04-07-2010, 21:52
Ugh. I HATE Photobucket. That video froze my entire browser.

Manofprint
04-07-2010, 22:18
I have a compensated barrel on my fiances Moss 500
that she uses for trap shooting. All I know is it is a pain to clean after 100+ shells go through it.

gruntmedik
04-08-2010, 19:22
In the dark, your eyes are already dilated. When exposed to a bright light, they constrict.

Just wanted to clear that up.

RetDet
04-11-2010, 21:59
I have two Vang Comp Systems guns, one 870 and one 11-87. Both are ported, and it offers a bit more speed, but not that much. There is absolutely no loss of night vision, even when shot in pitch black. No problem at all.

You should try it before you post stuff, Dosei.

AAshooter
04-16-2010, 23:24
I have two Vang Comp Systems guns, one 870 and one 11-87. Both are ported, and it offers a bit more speed, but not that much. There is absolutely no loss of night vision, even when shot in pitch black. No problem at all.

You should try it before you post stuff, Dosei.

I agree. I find the porting diffuses the muzzle flash and night and I find it much more tolerable. Personally, I don't find significant differences in muzzle flip or recoil. Not saying they aren't reduced, I just don't experience a major difference.

As far as ported handguns, this is more problematic. If you are shooting from a retention position where the grip is tucked in by the side of your chest, the some porting exhaust up towards your face. Not a problem with a shotgun.