An INTERESTING and DIFFERENT idea. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Magnum 357
04-25-2010, 10:50
Let's say you for some reason have to clear a room or whatever, at night. You are using a flashlight with a strobe light.
Instead of just using the flashlight, use the strobe light. That way you will blind the BG and make a lot more difficult for him to hit you. You are not going to be blind by the strobe light and at the same time have enough light to shoot him.
I would like to know what do you guys think about it

steve2267
04-25-2010, 11:33
I'll bite.

If I'm the BG you are strobing, and I have a gun, why not just blast the strobing light? Or all around the strobing light? After all, I'm a BG, what do I care what I hit?

Magnum 357
04-25-2010, 13:03
Steve:

The samething could apply if you are using the regular light!
What I am proposing is an alternative that make it harder for the BG.

steve2267
04-25-2010, 13:24
I agree. But how does a strobing light make it any more difficult for me to shoot at the light? If you are manually strobing or flashing the light at random intervals, I agree with you. But if you are using a flashlight with a strobe feature that flashes at a regular interval, unless I'm epileptic, I don't see the advantage?

(I'm kinda playing devil's advocate with your idea. Nothing personal.)

David Armstrong
04-25-2010, 14:10
ANY light used by you is going to cause you to lose your night vision, strobing or steady. If it is bright enough to create a vision problem for the BG it is going to create a vision problem for you. Only real difference might come if you manage to shine the light directly into the BGs eyes.

Magnum 357
04-25-2010, 14:43
If he tries to shoot at the light, or anything around is because he IS looking at the light, that is going to impair HIS vision. I am going to be on the other side, so my vision is not going to be impair that much.
Steve I don't take anything personal, I am just trying to LEARN from the people that knows more than me. I just want you try it and see...I might be wrong...it won't be the first time!!!

dosei
04-25-2010, 15:16
If it is bright enough to create a vision problem for the BG it is going to create a vision problem for you. Only real difference might come if you manage to shine the light directly into the BGs eyes.

A completely incorrect assumption sir. Since I have no doubt you have driven a automobile at night, you really should know better. Driving at night with nobody else on the road, we use the high beams on the vehicle. When we approach another vehicle we dim the lights to the low beams. We do not do this because our own high beams would impair our vision. Quite the contrary...we do it because the high beams will impair the vision of the other vehicle. At no time does the use of our own headlights, high beam or low beam, cause us to be blinded. It is the light from an oncoming vehicle that impairs our vision. The eyes in front of a light are the ones that will have a far greater problem adjusting...the eyes behind the light have the advantage.

As to strobe vs. continues...it's mostly theoretical at this point. I personally would theorize that if one is more of a problem to the eyes in front, it would most likely be the strobe (I've played with both). I can say that I have found the strobe to be considerably better at disorienting/dazing free-roaming aggressive dogs at night...but both work well.

David Armstrong
04-25-2010, 16:20
A completely incorrect assumption sir. Since I have no doubt you have driven a automobile at night, you really should know better.
When one drives at night the lights from your own headlights have pretty well ruined your night vision. You can see that quite clearly by driving for while with your lights on, then turning them off on a dark road. You won't be able to see much of anything for a bit. You have lost most, if not all, of your night vision. Same thing happens in the home with a flashlight. If it is bright enough to impair the BG it is bright enough to impair you, with the caveat that being hit right in the eyes is a differeent matter.
Quite the contrary...we do it because the high beams will impair the vision of the other vehicle.
The high beams have already impaired our vision whether there is another vehicle coming or not. It is not the light output alone from the highs that causes the problem for the other driver, it is the positioning. A good example is if you put a heavy load in the trunk, and then drive at night. Oncoming drivers will often flash their lights at you, as they think you have the high beams on as the lights are now directed higher.
At no time does the use of our own headlights, high beam or low beam, cause us to be blinded. It is the light from an oncoming vehicle that impairs our vision.
Didn't say anything about being blinded, said "vision problem". Loss of night vision and such does not equate with blind. While our own lights don't cause us to be blinded (nor do the lights of an oncoming vehicle), they do impair our vison. Try this some night. On a dark road, you being the only vehicle, try to identify objects at the side of the road that are not lit by your headlights. Then leave the lights off for a while and try the same experiment. That is one of the reasons for light discipline in the military. Not letting the BGs know where you are is one concern, but ruining your own ability to see is also a concern.

Magnum 357
04-26-2010, 09:40
David:

Take a strobe light and stay in front of it. Now stay in the back of it. Are you going to tell me that is the same??? What you do is making more difficult for the BG to hit you.
But please BEFORE you argue TRY IT.

David Armstrong
04-26-2010, 09:55
He is not talking a strobe light. He is talking about a flashlight used in the strobe function. Unless the light is aimed where it hits the BG fairly directly the loss of vision will be similar with both parties.
But please BEFORE you argue TRY IT.
Done that. The Surefire light people have a very good seminar discussing and demonstrating (in part) just this kind of stuff. Again, placing the light on the perp so it hits them directly is one thing. But unless that happens activating the light will tend to harm your night vision as well as the BGs night vision. You might want to try it yourself. Go into a room with your night vision intact, turn a bright light on without looking at it, turn it off and then see how much night vision you still have.

Magnum 357
04-26-2010, 10:28
David can you give me the link of the Streamlight study?

I tried it BEFORE I wrote this, the BG is on the side of the strobe light and his vision is going to be impair MORE than yours.

KillStick
04-26-2010, 10:39
Let's say you for some reason have to clear a room or whatever, at night. You are using a flashlight with a strobe light.
Instead of just using the flashlight, use the strobe light. That way you will blind the BG and make a lot more difficult for him to hit you. You are not going to be blind by the strobe light and at the same time have enough light to shoot him.
I would like to know what do you guys think about it


Did you go watch the movie KickAss:tongueout:

David Armstrong
04-26-2010, 10:51
David can you give me the link of the Streamlight study?

I tried it BEFORE I wrote this, the BG is on the side of the strobe light and his vision is going to be impair MORE than yours.

I'm sure there is a study out there, but I don't know where it would be. My comments and some experience comes from a seminar put on by SureFire. IIRC, it is called the "Low-Light Operator" course, so you might try contacting them.
Yes, as I said, if the light hits the BG directly he will have more vision problems than you, but in the searching mode when you flash the light on you are going to lose your night vision. So is he. So is everybody and anybody in the room that has their eyes open.

dosei
04-26-2010, 11:00
He is not talking a strobe light. He is talking about a flashlight used in the strobe function.

...who is the "He" you are referring to?

...and just what is the difference between a strobe light & a flashlight with a strobe function? (besides the fact that one generally plugs into an electrical outlet and has a variable strobe rate while the other is powered by batteries and has a fixed strobe rate)

David Armstrong
04-26-2010, 12:01
who is the "He" you are referring to?
The OP, who wrote "You are using a flashlight with a strobe light."
and just what is the difference between a strobe light & a flashlight with a strobe function?
IME strobe lights generally are capable of flashing at a higher rate, provide wider diffusion, and cannot be utilized as a flashlight. A flashlight with a strobe function is just that, a flashlight that can be adjusted to flash on and off. Flashlights with strobe function operate pretty much the same as flashing the light on and off yourself, but with a better control of rate of flash.

dosei
04-26-2010, 12:27
The only one I've seen strobe personally is the Fenix TK-12. Videos of the lights in strobe mode do not work, since the videos are shot at 25 frames per second and the light strobes at a very high rate...resulting in some odd looking video. (Much like a video of a helicopter where the blades do not appear to be moving or sometimes even appear to be moving backward)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8mavWTJDBw
I can pretty much guarantee that nobody can strobe a flashlight manually anywhere near as fast as the TK-12 strobes on it's own.

MTPD
04-26-2010, 14:00
Granted, there are negatives to using lights to clear rooms. However, if you don't use a light you may accidently shoot a friend, relative or some other innocent. That being the case, I choose to mount lights on all my home defense guns. And all are equiped with on/off falshlight tail switches, so I can instantly turn them on or off with a touch of the switch without moving my gun-hand.

I think strobes cause more problems than they solve. Especially since they make the target harder to ID and/or hit.

GreyEclipse
04-26-2010, 14:32
Sounds like the OP knows how to party. STROBE LIGHTS!