How long do you run your tumbler till brass is clean? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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JDinNC
04-28-2010, 20:06
I just bought a Hornady case tumbler and Lyman Turbo Tumbler Media. On the Lyman jug, "corncob green" is checked. Im looking to clean 100 45acp cases. How many hours should I let it run? I have it half full. I am trying to begin to reload. When I determine a good load, then I'll do 500 at a time. How full does it need to be?

GioaJack
04-28-2010, 20:15
They'll get 'clean' in just a few minutes, (assuming it's not abused brass with two years of mud on 'em),... if you want 'em 'shiny, out of the box see your face in 'em or glittery enough to use as a bass lure' turn the tumbler on and go watch an HBO movie or two.

Clean is all you need but shiny attracts loose women... or so I've heard.

Jack

RustyFN
04-28-2010, 20:28
I tumble my brass in walnut with Nu Finish car polish for 1.5 hours and it comes out nice and shiny. I would say check it in a hour and see if you are happy with it or want to go longer.

kshutt
04-28-2010, 20:38
I like mine SHINY! I'll run about 400 of 'em at a time for about 5 hours. Admittedly, however, I haven't shared with the wife what they'll attract after that length of time. :supergrin:

tglynn
04-28-2010, 20:58
They'll get 'clean' in just a few minutes, (assuming it's not abused brass with two years of mud on 'em),... if you want 'em 'shiny, out of the box see your face in 'em or glittery enough to use as a bass lure' turn the tumbler on and go watch an HBO movie or two.

Clean is all you need but shiny attracts loose women... or so I've heard.

Jack

I am new to reloading as well and I want my brass as clean as possible. I have been tumbling my brass in the Lyman red media for a couple hours per batch. It gets them really clean, but leaves red film inside and out. Do I need to do anything further to clean this film off or should I just continue the process?

pacountryboy
04-28-2010, 21:03
i throw between 100-500 (depending how much i shoot that week) in mine with walnut, but you can do one casing if you want.... go 1 hour and your brass should be fine like anyone else has mentioned, but shiny takes a little while longer. i've also noticed the more brass in, the quicker they get shiny. welcome to the reloading world and good luck with it. it's become a science for me and time seems to fly when doing it!

GioaJack
04-28-2010, 21:05
I am new to reloading as well and I want my brass as clean as possible. I have been tumbling my brass in the Lyman red media for a couple hours per batch. It gets them really clean, but leaves red film inside and out. Do I need to do anything further to clean this film off or should I just continue the process?


A dryer sheet cut up into a couple of strips will help absorb quite a bit of the red dust. The longer you use the media the less red dust you'll notice.

Unless it's really caked on your brass it won't hurt anything but if it's bothersome just go down to Petsmart and get some untreated corncob, take out half of your treated media and replace it with the untreated. Let your tumbler mix it up for a few minutes and you'll be good to go.

Jack

atakawow
04-28-2010, 21:07
Clean is clean enough. For pistol brass, 30 mins and they are good to go. You can shine them all you want, but once that brass leaves the chamber, it will be looking just as ugly as my 'clean enough.'

GioaJack
04-28-2010, 21:17
For the newer loaders around here... the real purpose of tumbling brass is to clean it... remove dirt, grime, cobwebs etc. from the inside of the case and any dirt or debris from the outside of the case to avoid damage to your dies.

Getting your brass 'shiny' is merely a cosmetic result with time and is of no real value other than personal preference. Less than a half hour in a tumbler will get several hundred pistol cases 'clean'.

I know it seems hard to believe but the world of loading didn't start with the invention of the tumbler... there are a bunch of us who wiped off every case with a rag then loaded 'em... and if they were revolver cases we usually didn't even bother doing that.

Of course I'm not old enough to have done this personally... I've heard stories from Fred, bob2223, Cobra64 and unclebob. They're probably taking naps right now.

Jack

bush pilot
04-28-2010, 22:25
Crushed walnut media (24 grit) from Harbor Tool and a cap or two of NuFinish. Tumble for 90 or so minutes and don't look back. You don't need to buy the the overpriced stuff that Lyman or RCBS sells. BTW, there are plenty of alternatives to my choice, it just happens to be what I like.

Wash-ar15
04-28-2010, 22:41
Get a timer and plug it into the tumbler and set it for 2-3 hours and it should come out nice and shiny.

Cobra64
04-28-2010, 23:31
For the newer loaders around here... the real purpose of tumbling brass is to clean it... remove dirt, grime, cobwebs etc. from the inside of the case and any dirt or debris from the outside of the case to avoid damage to your dies.

Getting your brass 'shiny' is merely a cosmetic result with time and is of no real value other than personal preference. Less than a half hour in a tumbler will get several hundred pistol cases 'clean'.

I know it seems hard to believe but the world of loading didn't start with the invention of the tumbler... there are a bunch of us who wiped off every case with a rag then loaded 'em... and if they were revolver cases we usually didn't even bother doing that.

Of course I'm not old enough to have done this personally... I've heard stories from Fred, bob2223, Cobra64 and unclebob. They're probably taking naps right now.

Jack

I can't remember if it's before or after naps; :yawn: but I hand polish every case and bullet.
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Ammo/P1030950.jpg


http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Ammo/HOLLOWPOINTS.jpg




Ever try polishing shot? It takes a long time.:faint:

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Ammo/ShtoshellBuckshot.jpg



.

Myke_Hart
04-29-2010, 05:33
Mine get a 2 hour timer run. They are usually as shiney as they are gonna get by then. My shotshell still get wiped with a rag before going in the hopper.

By the way, is that a trumpet case above. Can you say toooo much bell. :rofl:

KB2MBC
04-29-2010, 05:43
I can't remember if it's before or after naps; :yawn: but I hand polish every case and bullet.
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Ammo/P1030950.jpg







Ever try polishing shot? It takes a long time.:faint:





.
You might want to adjust your expander die.

Cobra64
04-29-2010, 06:44
You might want to adjust your expander die.

Ya think? :rofl:

A .38 Super case got mixed in with 9mm. Sorta cool huh? :supergrin:

tglynn
04-29-2010, 07:54
A dryer sheet cut up into a couple of strips will help absorb quite a bit of the red dust. The longer you use the media the less red dust you'll notice.

Unless it's really caked on your brass it won't hurt anything but if it's bothersome just go down to Petsmart and get some untreated corncob, take out half of your treated media and replace it with the untreated. Let your tumbler mix it up for a few minutes and you'll be good to go.

Jack

Thanks for the info. Will give them both a try and see which one I like best.

Zombie Steve
04-29-2010, 08:04
I can't remember if it's before or after naps; :yawn: but I hand polish every case and bullet.[center]
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/Davis1950/Weapons/Ammo/P1030950.jpg


.

Yep. Too much cowbell. :supergrin:

mteagle1
04-29-2010, 08:20
I start 'em out with walnut & a couple oz of mineral spirts for an hour then corn cob & NuFinish for another hour. I like them shiny.

fredj338
04-29-2010, 11:44
I am new to reloading as well and I want my brass as clean as possible. I have been tumbling my brass in the Lyman red media for a couple hours per batch. It gets them really clean, but leaves red film inside and out. Do I need to do anything further to clean this film off or should I just continue the process?
That i spolishing rouge. You don't really want it inside your dies, it is a mild abrasive.
I tumble for 3-4hrs in 50/50 fine wlanut & corn cob w/ a cap of polish; Nufinish or Dillon. After separating, I roll the cases around inside an old towel to remove any dust, ziplock or plastic jug for storage until reloaded.

DoctaGlockta
04-29-2010, 11:57
3 hours or so in crushed walnut that I bought at Petsmart (Lizard litter something). Sometimes I throw in a capfull of Nufinish when I remember. I have some dryer sheets cut up in the tumbler too. Can't imagine the cases getting any cleaner/shinier. Also tumble cartridges for a half hour or so before I put them away.

RustyFN
04-29-2010, 18:22
Getting your brass 'shiny' is merely a cosmetic result with time and is of no real value other than personal preference. Less than a half hour in a tumbler will get several hundred pistol cases 'clean'.

I would agree with that most of the time but the shiny brass attracts the ladies. :tongueout: It also makes it easier for me to find the brass in the gravel at our outdoor range.

GioaJack
04-29-2010, 18:51
I would agree with that most of the time but the shiny brass attracts the ladies. :tongueout: It also makes it easier for me to find the brass in the gravel at our outdoor range.


Once you have a grandson, or granddaughter, that will no longer be a problem. It just costs a few pieces of bubble gum. :supergrin:

Jack

GLShooter
04-29-2010, 19:03
Shooting clean or diamond in a billy goats butt clean??

About 1 1/2 hours in the big Dillon with walnut andNuFinish for "clean." About 4-5 hours with NuFish and walnut for sun glasses needed clean. I need to try some corn cob for the final polish but what I have is too big and sticks inside the 223 cases.

Greg

dudel
04-29-2010, 19:08
New media cleans quicker than used media.

Dirty brass takes longer to clean than less dirty brass.

The efficiency of the tumbler enters into it as well.

Too much brass, too little media = poor circulation of the brass in the tumbler which takes long to clean.

Too little brass, too much media has the same problem.

I keep the tumbler about 2/3 to 3/4 full of media. I start the tumbler and add brass till it starts to circulate in the bowl. Then I run for a hour if the media is fresh. Longer if the media has loaded up with dirt. I use strips of used fabric softner (or paper towel) to pick up dirt and extend the media. If I find it needs more, I'll give it another 2 hours. When I find I'm running more than 4 hours, I replace the media.

robin303
04-29-2010, 19:11
I mix half and half of corn cob and walnut and a couple caps of Nufinish and a little paint thinner and 12 hours later when I wake up I have some real nice shinny brass. :rofl: Two hrs min for me. I like the noise. :supergrin:

Webley Green
04-29-2010, 19:50
Anybody else use lizard grit - tried a bag, works for me.

GLShooter
04-29-2010, 20:20
Anybody else use lizard grit - tried a bag, works for me.

Lizard grit costs more than bird stuff here. I'll be a CRB and use the bird screenings.


Greg

Kwesi
04-30-2010, 13:14
I just ordered my Dillon 550. I was told by one of the Dillon reps that it is better to put a little more vs a smaller amount of brass in the tumbler. The xtra brass will actually reduce the time it takes to clean.

I did just ordered the "Quick - n - EZ™ Case Tumbler Kit" from Sportsmansguide here:

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=408005

I was able to get it the entire kit for $55.97 + free shipping by renewing my membership. Anyone using this kit?

proraptor
04-30-2010, 14:27
I just ordered my Dillon 550. I was told by one of the Dillon reps that it is better to put a little more vs a smaller amount of brass in the tumbler. The xtra brass will actually reduce the time it takes to clean.

I did just ordered the "Quick - n - EZ™ Case Tumbler Kit" from Sportsmansguide here:

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=408005

I was able to get it the entire kit for $55.97 + free shipping by renewing my membership. Anyone using this kit?

Looks like a rebadged frankford arsenal tumbler.....They work good but are ridiculously loud

Kwesi
04-30-2010, 14:33
Yeah it definitely has that written all over it but the last review that I read commented on how quiet it is.

gjk5
04-30-2010, 15:46
walnut (bought a big ass Berry's bucket), strips of dryer sheet, NF, 2 hours on a christmas light timer.

A lot of mine are range scrounged and have mud and adobe clay on them, they need that long.

MarioS
05-03-2010, 04:27
I usually run my tumbler for about 1-2 hours. It doesn't need that long but I like my brass a little "cleaner" and shinier.

CaptAdams35
09-07-2013, 07:33
I just started reloading after the last ammo buy-up and plan to keep re-using the Winchester Nickle and Starline brass as much as possible. I carry a 3rd Gen Glock 20, which doesn't have a problem eating anything (fed it a Snickers and she swallowed it whole), but wanted to know if you reloading "vets" have an idea of how many times these cases can be re-used. I've heard that the nickle casings last longer (more than a dozen reloads without fail) but wanted more input on the matter. I'm pushing 180gr Noslers with 9.5gr of Hogdon's HS-6 @ 1150fps. May get into casting later, but for now I've stocked up on these components and would like to know what the longevity of my casings should be. Also..... I've found that 75% walnut with 25% corn cob mixed with a powder I found on Ebay cleans FILTHY brass to a polished shine in less than 90 minutes (inside, outside and primer pockets as well). Brass Polish for Reloading Virbratoy Casing Tumblers 1 2 Pound Free Shipping | eBay

ColoCG
09-07-2013, 14:30
I just started reloading after the last ammo buy-up and plan to keep re-using the Winchester Nickle and Starline brass as much as possible. I carry a 3rd Gen Glock 20, which doesn't have a problem eating anything (fed it a Snickers and she swallowed it whole), but wanted to know if you reloading "vets" have an idea of how many times these cases can be re-used. I've heard that the nickle casings last longer (more than a dozen reloads without fail) but wanted more input on the matter. I'm pushing 180gr Noslers with 9.5gr of Hogdon's HS-6 @ 1150fps. May get into casting later, but for now I've stocked up on these components and would like to know what the longevity of my casings should be. Also..... I've found that 75% walnut with 25% corn cob mixed with a powder I found on Ebay cleans FILTHY brass to a polished shine in less than 90 minutes (inside, outside and primer pockets as well). Brass Polish for Reloading Virbratoy Casing Tumblers 1 2 Pound Free Shipping | eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Brass-Polish-For-Reloading-Virbratoy-Casing-Tumblers-1-2-pound-FREE-SHIPPING-/280767322452?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item415f095954)


Actually it is just the opposite, Nickel plated brass is more brittle because of the plating and tends to crack or split sooner than the plain brass. Either way you should get 10 to 12 reloads out of the brass depending on pressure. Low pressure loads go 20 or more times. Depends whether you just shoot midrange loads or full power loads.

SARDG
09-07-2013, 15:24
The last nickel case episode I had was when I was ROing and a shooter/reloader had a case head separation that blew the extractor past my nose to the other side of the bay. No way to know if it was an over charged load, over used and not closely inspected case, or what. It was a .40 cal Glock. When I think of nickel, I think of that.

Taterhead
09-07-2013, 20:52
I just started reloading after the last ammo buy-up and plan to keep re-using the Winchester Nickle and Starline brass as much as possible. I carry a 3rd Gen Glock 20, which doesn't have a problem eating anything (fed it a Snickers and she swallowed it whole), but wanted to know if you reloading "vets" have an idea of how many times these cases can be re-used. I've heard that the nickle casings last longer (more than a dozen reloads without fail) but wanted more input on the matter. I'm pushing 180gr Noslers with 9.5gr of Hogdon's HS-6 @ 1150fps. May get into casting later, but for now I've stocked up on these components and would like to know what the longevity of my casings should be. Also..... I've found that 75% walnut with 25% corn cob mixed with a powder I found on Ebay cleans FILTHY brass to a polished shine in less than 90 minutes (inside, outside and primer pockets as well). Brass Polish for Reloading Virbratoy Casing Tumblers 1 2 Pound Free Shipping | eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Brass-Polish-For-Reloading-Virbratoy-Casing-Tumblers-1-2-pound-FREE-SHIPPING-/280767322452?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item415f095954)

I was curious too about how many reloads I get for my G20 (gen 3) with stock barrel, so I kept track for a while. I get 9 loads out of Starline brass. I use Starline almost exclusively since I have shot very little factory 10mm ammo.

My typical range load is in the 1100-1150 fps for a 180. My brass begins life with a hot load, and then it is tossed into the range assortment.

Here is a little qualification to what I mentioned earlier: Most guys around here toss brass when it splits. I tossed a lot of mine due to shrinking. I found that the life of my 10mm brass was usually limited by it shrinking below specs rather than splitting. Straight wall pistol brass tends to shrink over time. So I tossed them when they get shorter than 0.980".

The truth is that shorter brass is really not a huge problem, but shorter brass will have a slight effect when belling and crimping. It is cheap, so I just toss it. Again, most guys would just keep loading it until it splits, and they wouldn't have problems most likely.

I started with around 300 rounds nickel brass years ago. Mostly R-P and some Double Tap (made by Starline). This brass was more brittle. It was prone to splitting - sometimes in the resizer. Another word of caution is that I experienced compromised neck tension, after a few reloads, with nickel brass. Shorter bullets (155 gr and less) with shorter bearing surface had some severe setback tendencies. You'll want to watch for that. 180s and heavier are usually ok.

Bello
09-14-2013, 06:15
I decap brass and disk it on a hot water solution with soap then take it out toss it in tumbler hour or so