Got my press... Bullets. [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Got my press... Bullets.


G1ock N9nteen
05-04-2010, 12:04
Got a LCT some range brass, Hodgdon Universal, Federal primers. But no bullets. I'm thinking of some Precision Delta FMJs. Will things change if I get some different bullets to tide me over? I'm heading down to Warehouse Sports (formally Sportsman Warehouse over here) to grab some bullets and a reloading book.

XDRoX
05-04-2010, 12:09
Got a LCT some range brass, Hodgdon Universal, Federal primers. But no bullets. I'm thinking of some Precision Delta FMJs. Will things change if I get some different bullets to tide me over? I'm heading down to Warehouse Sports (formally Sportsman Warehouse over here) to grab some bullets and a reloading book.

What do you mean by "Will things change?"
People really like PD, I've read good things about them. I shoot Berry's an Rainier's plated bullets and have had great luck with them. I like the Berry's more as they seem to be more consistent in weight and size.

fredj338
05-04-2010, 12:21
What caliber? Bullets are pretty much available acoross the caliber spectrum; Berry's ranier, PrecDelta & at least a dozen good cast bullet sources.

G1ock N9nteen
05-04-2010, 12:25
Will I need to start the load over when I switch bullets? Is bullet manufacture as important as bullet type? I know I'll learn more when I re what ever book I'm getting, but I love to has much info as possible.

G1ock N9nteen
05-04-2010, 12:35
Starting with the 9 then I'm going .40, .45 and .38/380

fredj338
05-04-2010, 13:02
Will I need to start the load over when I switch bullets? Is bullet manufacture as important as bullet type? I know I'll learn more when I re what ever book I'm getting, but I love to has much info as possible.
It's not so much bullet manuf as bullet construction & shape. Unless you load using the exact same bullets as the data, you are going to have to extrapolate. Match the bullets shape w/ the bullet in the data. Lead bullets load diff than jacketed, plated load diff than either. Some bullets have specific issues, like the Rem GoldenSabers, they have a driving band not a long bearign surface, & load longer than some others.
The biggest diff in bullet shape is OAL. A RNFMJ will have a longer OAL than a JHP of the same wt. Sounds complicated, but as long as you match the bullets you are using w/ the shape/construction of the bullets in the data, always work up your loads, you should be fine.

BBJones
05-04-2010, 13:16
From one newb reloader to another -

Before you get all the ingredients to load, read a good reloading manual first (or 2, or 3). With everything sitting in front of you, you may be tempted to start loading before you have the requisite knowledge.

As to your question. If you are going out to buy some 115FMJ from company A and then later decide you want to use 115FMJ from company B, your load will "PROBABLY" not be affected much. However, this is predicated on your loads not pushing the envelope (min OAL, Max OAL, powder charge etc..). If you had a medium load with the first bullet and then did the same load with another bullet of the same type you "SHOULD" be OK. The old rule of thumb is to start at the minimum and work up whenever you change a componet. When talking about lead, plated, FP, and JHP alot more variance exists between manufacuters

I use Zero FMJ's (from Roze Distribution) and have had excellent results with them. Montana Gold is another popular choice (they ship very fast with minimal to no wait). No experience with PD but hear they are fine. Be careful you don't confuse plated bullets with FMJ. Plated should be loaded as if they are lead.

Please just go slow and don't get in a hurry.

G1ock N9nteen
05-04-2010, 13:30
Got it.

CitizenOfDreams
05-04-2010, 13:36
I started reloading recently and immediately discovered that it's pretty hard to find bullets that won't make your reloaded rounds cost more than factory ammo. So far the most affordable bullets I found (9mm FMJ) were Precision Delta, followed by Berry's.

Colorado4Wheel
05-04-2010, 13:40
I started reloading recently and immediately discovered that it's pretty hard to find bullets that won't make your reloaded rounds cost more than factory ammo. So far the most affordable bullets I found (9mm FMJ) were Precision Delta, followed by Berry's.

You have to buy everything in bulk. Primers and Powder. If you find a good deal locally then thats fine. But often buying in bulk saves you a lot of money.

G1ock N9nteen
05-04-2010, 14:11
Ya I just got 5k primers in the mail today. I'm testing out Universal to see If I like it before I buy anything bigger. If I like it I can pick up what I believe is a #8 container of Universal for around $80.

ron59
05-04-2010, 14:24
I started reloading recently and immediately discovered that it's pretty hard to find bullets that won't make your reloaded rounds cost more than factory ammo. So far the most affordable bullets I found (9mm FMJ) were Precision Delta, followed by Berry's.


Seriously? I'm not sure what this means. I also load 9mm (147gr Montana Gold bullets - they are CMJ), and I can reload 1000 of these for $138.00 (assuming my brass is free, which it is in that I didn't have to "buy" it). If the moly's I'm about to try out are smoke-free enough I can shoot them indoors... price would be more like $100 per 1000.

Go out and buy 1000 rounds of factory ammo for that price. Show me where, and I'll stop reloading. Heck, Walmart WWB 115gr stuff is $23.00 per 100 count, which works out to like $250 per 1000. ($138 per 1000 as opposed to $250? That's no comparison, IMHO.)

Now... I order my powder in the 8 pound jug from Powder Valley, and primers 10,000 at a time from there also, so they only cost me $27.00 per 1000, maybe you're paying too much for primers.

But whatever it is that you're doing.... you're doing it wrong. ;) (sounds like I'm being a jerk, that's more a joke. But I WOULD look at how you're buying if the prices for factory vs. hand-reloaded are that close for you).

BBJones
05-04-2010, 14:42
+1 to what ron said. Primers 10k at a time. Powder 8# at a time. Bullets 10k at a time.

.13 per round 9mm with FMJ
.17 per round .45 with FMJ

No factory loaded stuff is even close to that price. For rifle the savings are even more, but rifle reloading is more labor intensive.

Reloading has finally allowed me to shoot as much as I want.

IndyGunFreak
05-04-2010, 15:19
But whatever it is that you're doing.... you're doing it wrong. ;) (sounds like I'm being a jerk, that's more a joke. But I WOULD look at how you're buying if the prices for factory vs. hand-reloaded are that close for you).

Totally agree with both of the above posters.....

I'm also at .17 for .45 and .14 for 9mm... That's around 170 and 140 for 1000rds..... I've not had to buy WWB value packs for a while, but I think they are running around $22 per 100 for 9mm.... Assuming that is accurate.. all you have to do is... the math. :)

IGF

billy396
05-04-2010, 15:41
I've been reloading since the late '70's, and for pistol bullets, I love Berry's, Montana Gold, Rainier, Zero, Hornady, and Remington. I've never had any trouble from any of these. As previous people have noted, make sure you read all of the info you need before loading. Plated bullets shouldn't be loaded as hot as jacketed, etc. I, personally, gauge every round after I take it out of the press. That way I know it's on the money. That's not really necessary if you have a good setup. Some people don't even have bullet gauges, they just use a barrel out of one of the guns they're going to be shooting with. A good set of gauges is handier to use and you know every round is perfect as far as OAL and diameter. I have a Dillon 550 progressive loader, and I would recommend it to anyone. Like many people, I started with an RCBS Rock Chucker. They both work just as good as the other, but the progressive press just gets you there faster as far as numbers of rounds loaded. Always concentrate on what you're doing, you can't reload and watch television, and don't smoke. It's very important to watch every round, as just 1 mistake could destroy a perfectly good gun or even body parts that you might need later. Put one finished 9mm round into a box of .40's and you'll probably regret it, unless you happen to catch it when you're loading mags. Don't ask me how I know, even though I was shooting factory ammo, it could have been my fault, and loading it into the mag was definitely my fault. It did demonstrate just how well those Smith M&P's are designed. All I hurt was the gun. Some people haven't been as lucky. I'll have to try some of those PD's.

IndyGunFreak
05-04-2010, 16:21
I've been reloading since the late '70's, and for pistol bullets, I love Berry's, Montana Gold, Rainier, Zero, Hornady, and Remington. I've never had any trouble from any of these. As previous people have noted, make sure you read all of the info you need before loading. Plated bullets shouldn't be loaded as hot as jacketed, etc. I, personally, gauge every round after I take it out of the press. That way I know it's on the money. That's not really necessary if you have a good setup. Some people don't even have bullet gauges, they just use a barrel out of one of the guns they're going to be shooting with. A good set of gauges is handier to use and you know every round is perfect as far as OAL and diameter. I have a Dillon 550 progressive loader, and I would recommend it to anyone. Like many people, I started with an RCBS Rock Chucker. They both work just as good as the other, but the progressive press just gets you there faster as far as numbers of rounds loaded. Always concentrate on what you're doing, you can't reload and watch television, and don't smoke. It's very important to watch every round, as just 1 mistake could destroy a perfectly good gun or even body parts that you might need later. Put one finished 9mm round into a box of .40's and you'll probably regret it, unless you happen to catch it when you're loading mags. Don't ask me how I know, even though I was shooting factory ammo, it could have been my fault, and loading it into the mag was definitely my fault. It did demonstrate just how well those Smith M&P's are designed. All I hurt was the gun. Some people haven't been as lucky. I'll have to try some of those PD's.

My brother accidentally shot a 9mm out of my .40 Sig. It didn't do anything but spiral out of the barrel and bulge the case like crazy.

IGF

dudel
05-04-2010, 17:16
Got a LCT some range brass, Hodgdon Universal, Federal primers. But no bullets. I'm thinking of some Precision Delta FMJs. Will things change if I get some different bullets to tide me over? I'm heading down to Warehouse Sports (formally Sportsman Warehouse over here) to grab some bullets and a reloading book.

Grab the book first. It'll point you to which projectiles are suitable for your powder. You don't mention the caliber; but Universal (there are three types) have limited suitability in handgun rounds. Not the most versatile powder for handguns out there.

dudel
05-04-2010, 17:20
Seriously? I'm not sure what this means. I also load 9mm (147gr Montana Gold bullets - they are CMJ), and I can reload 1000 of these for $138.00 (assuming my brass is free, which it is in that I didn't have to "buy" it). If the moly's I'm about to try out are smoke-free enough I can shoot them indoors... price would be more like $100 per 1000.

Go out and buy 1000 rounds of factory ammo for that price. Show me where, and I'll stop reloading. Heck, Walmart WWB 115gr stuff is $23.00 per 100 count, which works out to like $250 per 1000. ($138 per 1000 as opposed to $250? That's no comparison, IMHO.)

Now... I order my powder in the 8 pound jug from Powder Valley, and primers 10,000 at a time from there also, so they only cost me $27.00 per 1000, maybe you're paying too much for primers.

But whatever it is that you're doing.... you're doing it wrong. ;) (sounds like I'm being a jerk, that's more a joke. But I WOULD look at how you're buying if the prices for factory vs. hand-reloaded are that close for you).


BAD IDEA. It's the OPs first load. Don't go out and buy 10K projectiles that won't feed in your specific gun, or powder that doesn't have the flexibility. When starting out, start small. Work up your load. Once you've got it figured out, THEN go out and buy bulk. Primers are the only component that are safe to buy in large quantities.

BBJones
05-04-2010, 17:53
BAD IDEA. It's the OPs first load. Don't go out and buy 10K projectiles that won't feed in your specific gun, or powder that doesn't have the flexibility. When starting out, start small. Work up your load. Once you've got it figured out, THEN go out and buy bulk. Primers are the only component that are safe to buy in large quantities.

ron was addressing the guy who said reloading was more expensive to reload than buy factory.

The OP already has most of the stuff to get started reloading. He was going to get some bullets to try then switch to something else.

BBJones
05-04-2010, 17:57
Grab the book first. It'll point you to which projectiles are suitable for your powder. You don't mention the caliber; but Universal (there are three types) have limited suitability in handgun rounds. Not the most versatile powder for handguns out there.


Universal is fine and there is plenty of loading information for it for 9mm (the caliber that the OP said he was loading first).

3 types of Universal? are you confusing this with Clays? There are 3 types of powder with clays in their names.

G1ock N9nteen
05-04-2010, 18:08
Thanks for all the info guys. I'm loading for 115 and 124 for my pistol and 115 for my carbine.9 (looking into using slower burning powder). I'm going to stock up on some cheap HP for SHTF.

ron59
05-04-2010, 19:47
BAD IDEA. It's the OPs first load. Don't go out and buy 10K projectiles that won't feed in your specific gun, or powder that doesn't have the flexibility. When starting out, start small. Work up your load. Once you've got it figured out, THEN go out and buy bulk. Primers are the only component that are safe to buy in large quantities.

As has already been pointed out, the post of mine you quoted was to the guy saying he can't load cheaper than factory. NOT to the OP to jump in and start buying bulk stuff without having tried it first.

No, I didn't buy 8lb of powder first, I bought a 1lb jug. I don't even NOW buy 10k bullets at a time, MG doesn't give that much more of a discount for doing that. Most of the bullet places sell small amounts so you can see if you like them.

You love to twist everything into a Gordian knot. I'm surprised you didn't bring up the Lee FCD in your response to me. :whistling:

Colorado4Wheel
05-04-2010, 19:52
Just to rock the boat. I would buy a box of FMJ RN bullets in a freaking heartbeat. Even if I never tried them before. Never known a gun that didn't run with RN bullets. I wouldn't own one for long if it didn't run with RN bullets either. Primers are a bigger problem then bullets by far.

dubels
05-04-2010, 21:16
I am going to put my order in for some Precision Delta bullets after my next paycheck. I love their 147 TC FMJs.

chris in va
05-04-2010, 21:18
Give it time. You'll be casting before you know it.

dudel
05-05-2010, 05:13
You love to twist everything into a Gordian knot. I'm surprised you didn't bring up the Lee FCD in your response to me. :whistling:

If that's a Gordian knot, I can see you with velcro shoelaces. :supergrin:

I clearly said the OP should not follow that advice regarding powder or projectiles until he's developed a suitable load. Even now, I don't buy projectiles in 10K volumes because a: the discount isn't as big as it used to be, b: shipping is crazy on those quantities c: I like flexibility in projectiles and d: I tend to cast more of them now.

I don't tend to buy powder in large lots either. Target loads in 38spl, or light loads in 9mm or 45ACP are in the 2.7-4.4 gr range. 7000 grains of Bullseye goes a long way. I still have 4 1# canisters of this (about the same of Unique and AA#2) Varget I'll get in 4# or 8# containers, but then I'm going through 25+grains per round. A pound doesn't last quite as long.

Powder lasts a long time if properly stored. Still, how much cash do you want to tie up sitting on the shelves? Large primer buys I can see; however, if I had gone out and bought 10K LP primers, I'd be somewhat at a loss now. I've switched to SP 45 ACP cases, and phased out the large primer cases. Very pleased with the accuracy from the SP 45 ACP cases, and it means a: I no longer have to stock LP and b: life is easier not having to switch primer seaters/feeders on the 550b.

netmage2112
05-05-2010, 05:19
Just be prepared for a wait w/ Precision Delta; I'm going on week 2 for 1K 45acp and 40s&w... their pricing is awesome, but if your trying to feed a 'hunger' and want stuff on your door in days vs. weeks, look to some of the more timely suppliers... Montana Gold or Berry's for FMJ\Plated, & Missouri Bullet for lead - both have good chatter...

ron59
05-05-2010, 07:11
I clearly said the OP should not follow that advice regarding powder or projectiles until he's developed a suitable load. .
My advice was not targeted to the OP, but to another specific post which I directly quoted. My point about the Gordian knot is that you take statements completely out of context. Yes, I did hijack the thread indirectly when responding to that guy, but it seems like everybody but you realized that. And thus to an extent put words in my mouth (as if I was telling the OP to do that, which I wasn't).


I don't tend to buy powder in large lots either.


It depends on how you reload. Sounds like you may reload multiple calibers, and use different powders for each? And possibly don't shoot a lot with any of them (as in, 20,000 per year a lot) ?

I am reloading *only* for 9mm, and I've reloaded 15,000+ just since last July. In that time, I've gone through TWO one pound cannisters (one of Universal Clays and one of Solo 1000), and just about to finish up an EIGHT pound cannister of the Solo 1000. If you shoot like I do, and have a powder you like, buying it in 8 lb cannister "increments" is going to be WAAAAAAAYYYYY cheaper than buying 8 1lb cannisters. I don't see how that can be considered "tying up cash with powder sitting on the shelf".

I like to shoot (obviously), and trying to do it as affordably as I can. Primers 10,000 at a time, and 8lb cannisters of powder at a time. Bullets in the largest amount I can afford, where I get the rate break, which at MG is 3000.

Your shooting/reloading habits and needs may well be different. But for me... I'm certain I'm doing it the way that is cheapest for me, with my current budget.