I am all set up and ready for my press... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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KiloBravo
05-08-2010, 14:10
I built my work bench this morning entirely out of scrap wood and drywall screws I had laying around. That makes the last two projects I put together cost exactly $0.00. I don't like buying material for that type of stuff unless I absolutely have to.

I made it just over 3' wide and 31" tall. I wanted to be able to sit and load if I so choose. I built in an extra shelf that allows me to fit my tumbler, bullets, primers, powder, etc.

The only thing I have on top is a pen, notepad, calculator, and loading manuals. I left the rest of the top counter space empty. I should have plenty of room to mount the press on the right side, and to leave my scale and stuff out all the time.

The only thing left to do now is wait until the main stuff comes in sometime this coming week. Bring it home, bolt it down, and get to work making my own ammunition. :supergrin: I wanted to make sure I had everything else taken care of before the day came for me to go pick it all up.

I just wanted to say thanks to everybody who has helped me out in getting this far along in the process. It def. does not happen overnight, LOL. It is greatly appreciated. :wavey:

I am sure I will have many more questions, and will continue to post them up as I think of them. Thanks again!

Colorado4Wheel
05-08-2010, 16:37
Build a shelf at eye level for you scale. Oh and post some pictures of the black dotted $0 devil.

Zombie Steve
05-08-2010, 18:52
The only thing I have on top is a pen, notepad, calculator, and loading manuals.


Can I suggest you get a 6-pack of different colored Sharpie markers? When you start working up batches, it makes it easy to color code the primers for different charge weights. Very helpful if you go out to the range and drop a box of ammo on the ground (ask me how I know :embarassed:).

Congrats on the setup. Looking forward to reading the "Shot my first reloads" thread.

robin303
05-08-2010, 21:16
I buy those Avery labels you can get at a office supply store and mark the powder that I'm using and put it on the powder measure. It helps me out when your doing several powders. Our friend Jack should chime in soon on the proper location for the wide screen TV and wet bar and the proper distance for the ashtray for your cigars. :supergrin:<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>

Twisted Steel
05-08-2010, 21:52
Ain't it cool!!!!

KiloBravo
05-09-2010, 05:39
Build a shelf at eye level for you scale. Oh and post some pictures of the black dotted $0 devil.

Thanks a lot! I will do just that. I took a few last night of it. Will upload them this morning.

KiloBravo
05-09-2010, 05:40
Can I suggest you get a 6-pack of different colored Sharpie markers? When you start working up batches, it makes it easy to color code the primers for different charge weights. Very helpful if you go out to the range and drop a box of ammo on the ground (ask me how I know :embarassed:).

Congrats on the setup. Looking forward to reading the "Shot my first reloads" thread.

Thanks a lot. I will make sure to pick up a pack the next time I am at the store! :wavey:

KiloBravo
05-09-2010, 05:49
Here are some pics. Please excuse the horrible lighting. The sun was coming though the window and bouncing off of the top of the bench. It is nothing special by any means, but is rock solid and should work just fine.

In case anybody was going to ask, the block of wood I screwed to the front left corner is for me to have something to smack my bullet puller against when I screw something up, LOL. I should also add that I plan on building a shelving unit that will come up behind and mount to the back of it. It will give me a lot more storage space to accumulate even more crap.

http://i379.photobucket.com/albums/oo232/DeerPredator/0508101558.jpg

http://i379.photobucket.com/albums/oo232/DeerPredator/0508101558a.jpg

GioaJack
05-09-2010, 10:28
My hearty congratulations, you are well on your way to entering the warped world of reloading. Life as you once knew it is about to end... as they say in NASCAR, reach down and pull those straps tight one more time... you're in for a hell of a ride.

There are some finer points of loading that you should be aware of that are not completely covered in either the ABC's of loading or the manuals. (This is an obvious shortcoming of both the writers and publishers which I attribute to their time spent in the public school system. If this lackadaisical attitude continues we will soon be no more than a second rate reloading nation.)

One of the more important attribute of effective loading is size and placement of the flat screen television. This is often overlook by the less informed and can result in a less than optimal loading experience.

Experience has shown that a 32 inch screen, (measured on the diagonal) fits the vast majority of loading room configurations. Any larger and you feel like you're loading at the drive-in movies and any smaller and you lose the fine, yet important detail in the higher class porno flicks. It goes without saying that the tv should be hooked up to a high definition DVR so you can replay unusually interesting segments that you missed while re-filling your powder measure or wiping ketchup off your chin from you mid-loading hamburger snack.

Placement of the tv is equally important. Newer loaders tend to mount the tv on the wall directly behind the press... this is a mistake. It causes the loader to be constantly looking up, putting undo strain on the neck muscles resulting in a nagging headache after a long loading session. The tv should, instead, be mounted off to the side on a swivel and tilting wall mount which can be easily aimed in the direction of any of your six presses. A 5.1 channel audio receiver is mandatory in the event there is nothing worth watching on the 200 satellite channels a Serious or XM radio country station can be tuned in. This serves a dual purpose, it provides for a pleasant diversion while actually loading ammunition or allows for practicing your two and three step while waiting for the tumbler to finish cleaning brass. (Don't trip over the dog or the cat.)

Many less than astute loaders are quick to offer suggestions on placement of the wet bar... this is an obvious sign of lack of class and maturity. There is no reason to have a wet bar in a loading room, or anywhere else. Why would one defile expensive liquor with water and ice. A true loader drinks his panty removing nectar neat and straight up. Beware of these obviously rookie suggestions and simply stick to five or six bottles of either fine scotch or blended whisky. (No tiny umbrellas or fruit slices are required.) Keep it simple, there is no reason to clutter-up your loading room.

Although I truly enjoy Rocky Patal Vintage 1992 and Padron Churchill cigars I am fully cognizant of the health hazards of smoking and would never suggest that someone develop the habit. It is not an absolute requirement for loading... it simply makes the activity much more enjoyable. Besides, at $12 and $15 apiece prudent financial expenditures pretty much limit the average loader to no more that 4 or 5 a day... some money must be allocated for primers and powder.

As you travel down the path of reloading we'll continually offer more suggestions to help you reach the level of the 'old guys' but for now these rudimentary tips should start you well on your way.

Good luck and happy loading.

Jack

KiloBravo
05-09-2010, 10:39
My hearty congratulations, you are well on your way to entering the warped world of reloading. Life as you once knew it is about to end... as they say in NASCAR, reach down and pull those straps tight one more time... you're in for a hell of a ride.

There are some finer points of loading that you should be aware of that are not completely covered in either the ABC's of loading or the manuals. (This is an obvious shortcoming of both the writers and publishers which I attribute to their time spent in the public school system. If this lackadaisical attitude continues we will soon be no more than a second rate reloading nation.)

One of the more important attribute of effective loading is size and placement of the flat screen television. This is often overlook by the less informed and can result in a less than optimal loading experience.

Experience has shown that a 32 inch screen, (measured on the diagonal) fits the vast majority of loading room configurations. Any larger and you feel like you're loading at the drive-in movies and any smaller and you lose the fine, yet important detail in the higher class porno flicks. It goes without saying that the tv should be hooked up to a high definition DVR so you can replay unusually interesting segments that you missed while re-filling your powder measure or wiping ketchup off your chin from you mid-loading hamburger snack.

Placement of the tv is equally important. Newer loaders tend to mount the tv on the wall directly behind the press... this is a mistake. It causes the loader to be constantly looking up, putting undo strain on the neck muscles resulting in a nagging headache after a long loading session. The tv should, instead, be mounted off to the side on a swivel and tilting wall mount which can be easily aimed in the direction of any of your six presses. A 5.1 channel audio receiver is mandatory in the event there is nothing worth watching on the 200 satellite channels a Serious or XM radio country station can be tuned in. This serves a dual purpose, it provides for a pleasant diversion while actually loading ammunition or allows for practicing your two and three step while waiting for the tumbler to finish cleaning brass. (Don't trip over the dog or the cat.)

Many less than astute loaders are quick to offer suggestions on placement of the wet bar... this is an obvious sign of lack of class and maturity. There is no reason to have a wet bar in a loading room, or anywhere else. Why would one defile expensive liquor with water and ice. A true loader drinks his panty removing nectar neat and straight up. Beware of these obviously rookie suggestions and simply stick to five or six bottles of either fine scotch or blended whisky. (No tiny umbrellas or fruit slices are required.) Keep it simple, there is no reason to clutter-up your loading room.

Although I truly enjoy Rocky Patal Vintage 1992 and Padron Churchill cigars I am fully cognizant of the health hazards of smoking and would never suggest that someone develop the habit. It is not an absolute requirement for loading... it simply makes the activity much more enjoyable. Besides, at $12 and $15 apiece prudent financial expenditures pretty much limit the average loader to no more that 4 or 5 a day... some money must be allocated for primers and powder.

As you travel down the path of reloading we'll continually offer more suggestions to help you reach the level of the 'old guys' but for now these rudimentary tips should start you well on your way.

Good luck and happy loading.

Jack

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

Jack...This was absolutely classic. It should almost be its own sticky! :supergrin:

Thanks very much for the tips. I will heed every one of your warnings and keep them in mind since I am starting out as a total novice.

Jon_R
05-09-2010, 10:40
Make sure it is plenty heavy and if feasible secure it to the wall. I am not sure what press you are getting and how it will be mounted but if you are on the front edge of the table you will be putting a lot of torque on it. You can also just pile lots of heavy stuff on the bottom shelf.

I went a head and made mine heavy and secured it to the wall but I am working in my finished garage so it was not that big of a deal.

I also went with a 550 with the strong mount so I could move the press back a decent amount from the edge of the table. My setup is very solid I load standing up. I also raised it up higher by putting it up on some bricks and added a cheap counter top from lowes to give it a more finished look.

Hope you get your stuff soon so you can get loading. My loading has stopped for a bit while I wait for Powder Valley or my local store to get some more Win 231 in. I load in big batches so I am still good on everything so not in a big hurry.

robin303
05-09-2010, 14:24
:rofl:Thanks Jack, I knew you would give us some feed back on the finer points of reloading. :supergrin:

tlafrance
05-09-2010, 15:11
I commend Jack on his choice of tobacco selection. Although I prefer the robusto sized smokes and a maduro wrapper, I can enjoy a less full bodied smoke when amongst friends.

I admit I made the mistake of mounting my TV above the press back in the day (my neck still pains me from time to time), I've since moved it off to the side, sage advice. Once I've relocated to the frozen wasteland of NE at the end of the month, I have plans to upgrade my 20inch CRT to a 32in HD, I can hardly wait.

I do suggest you invest in a mini fridge or kegerator to help keep your choice of carbonated beverages cold and close at hand.

Tom

Zombie Steve
05-09-2010, 16:13
I've also found that mounting a small light on the press helps you see the powder charge in the case. Then I replaced the knob on the end of the handle with a small disco ball. It really sets the mood for playing with your lever. :whistling:







Jack - should we tell him about the nitrous oxide yet, or let him get a few batches under his belt first?

KiloBravo
05-09-2010, 16:21
Jack - should we tell him about the nitrous oxide yet, or let him get a few batches under his belt first?

Please do tell! :supergrin: :whistling:

harleyfx69
05-09-2010, 16:55
your not going to want to run the tumbler in the same room / part of the house your in,

do it in a garage, outside, or in a vacant room with a window open,

they are stinky, dirty, noisy, and can be hazardous to your health if you breath in the fumes it produces from the chemicals and cases your tumbling

IndyGunFreak
05-09-2010, 18:01
My hearty congratulations, you are well on your way to entering the warped world of reloading. Life as you once knew it is about to end... as they say in NASCAR, reach down and pull those straps tight one more time... you're in for a hell of a ride.

There are some finer points of loading that you should be aware of that are not completely covered in either the ABC's of loading or the manuals. (This is an obvious shortcoming of both the writers and publishers which I attribute to their time spent in the public school system. If this lackadaisical attitude continues we will soon be no more than a second rate reloading nation.)

One of the more important attribute of effective loading is size and placement of the flat screen television. This is often overlook by the less informed and can result in a less than optimal loading experience.

Experience has shown that a 32 inch screen, (measured on the diagonal) fits the vast majority of loading room configurations. Any larger and you feel like you're loading at the drive-in movies and any smaller and you lose the fine, yet important detail in the higher class porno flicks. It goes without saying that the tv should be hooked up to a high definition DVR so you can replay unusually interesting segments that you missed while re-filling your powder measure or wiping ketchup off your chin from you mid-loading hamburger snack.

Placement of the tv is equally important. Newer loaders tend to mount the tv on the wall directly behind the press... this is a mistake. It causes the loader to be constantly looking up, putting undo strain on the neck muscles resulting in a nagging headache after a long loading session. The tv should, instead, be mounted off to the side on a swivel and tilting wall mount which can be easily aimed in the direction of any of your six presses. A 5.1 channel audio receiver is mandatory in the event there is nothing worth watching on the 200 satellite channels a Serious or XM radio country station can be tuned in. This serves a dual purpose, it provides for a pleasant diversion while actually loading ammunition or allows for practicing your two and three step while waiting for the tumbler to finish cleaning brass. (Don't trip over the dog or the cat.)

Many less than astute loaders are quick to offer suggestions on placement of the wet bar... this is an obvious sign of lack of class and maturity. There is no reason to have a wet bar in a loading room, or anywhere else. Why would one defile expensive liquor with water and ice. A true loader drinks his panty removing nectar neat and straight up. Beware of these obviously rookie suggestions and simply stick to five or six bottles of either fine scotch or blended whisky. (No tiny umbrellas or fruit slices are required.) Keep it simple, there is no reason to clutter-up your loading room.

Although I truly enjoy Rocky Patal Vintage 1992 and Padron Churchill cigars I am fully cognizant of the health hazards of smoking and would never suggest that someone develop the habit. It is not an absolute requirement for loading... it simply makes the activity much more enjoyable. Besides, at $12 and $15 apiece prudent financial expenditures pretty much limit the average loader to no more that 4 or 5 a day... some money must be allocated for primers and powder.

As you travel down the path of reloading we'll continually offer more suggestions to help you reach the level of the 'old guys' but for now these rudimentary tips should start you well on your way.

Good luck and happy loading.

Jack

:rofl:

Jack, did the butler forget to unlock your medicine cabinet? I think your system is running low today... :)

IGF

GioaJack
05-09-2010, 18:08
Dear Deerpredator: (sounds a bit redundant doesn't it.)

As you might recall, I cautioned against accepting advice from less than true professional reloaders... it appears that my cautions were indeed well timed.

Take for example Tom's suggestion of installing a kegerator in your loading room... pure folly at best, at worst... squib. Every loader who has more than a box of bullets under his belt knows full well that 'beer belches' are one of the quickest ways to contaminate and nullify the ignition properties of smokeless powder. I am shocked that he would even make such a rookie suggestion given the experienced loader that he is... however, should one really take seriously advice offered by someone who has yet to master the fine art of growing hair?

Another example of neophyte advice is that proffered by Zombie Steve, a well meaning fellow Coloradan. Install a Disco ball... indeed. Apparently his calendar subscription expired at the end of the last century. Although, as with Tom, his advice is most assuredly well meaning should you heed it you will be instantly transported back to a time when only two powders were known to pistol caliber loaders... Bullseye and Unique. By law you will be forced to replace all of you semi-automatics, (except your 1911's of course) with revolvers as well as replace your entire wardrobe with bellbottom pants, madras shirts and for those extra special formal occasions, lime green leisure suits.

On the other hand, the nitrous oxide is something you should definitely look forward to.

Your humble servant,
Jack

tlafrance
05-10-2010, 10:21
A point of clarification. At no time did I mention the consumption of carbonated beverages during the reloading process. Since my loading room is also my MAN cave, I occasionally retire to this fortress of solitude for a moment of peace and quiet. It's at these times, should the mood strike, that I may also enjoy a chilled beverage. My only other avenue for escape involves porcelain and an exhaust fan.

Regarding the carbonation issue: I do my part to increase my carbon footprint at every opportunity, just to piss off the liberal progressives. In addition the the "release" of captured carbon dioxide (loudly I might add), I also contribute to greenhouse gasses via the alternative southern route.

Tom

ETA: Follicly challenged by choice

KiloBravo
05-11-2010, 17:09
:rofl:You guys are awesome. This is def. funny and not what I expected for advice on reloading. :supergrin:

This week has seemed to last forever so far. That anticipation is killing me. I just want it so I can get started already. :whistling: