What if... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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NEOH212
05-09-2010, 21:59
I was reading another thread and it made me think of something that I never really thought of before. With all of the preparation, training that I have taken, and scenarios that I have run through, there is a issue that really hasn't been addressed. What is the proper thing to do if I, the armed civilian has to draw my firearm on a perp (assuming that I'm justified in doing so) and he gives up? So much time is spent in training learning gun manipulation, retention, failure drills, ect that I don't ever recall this question ever coming up. So I ask the expert, what would be the proper thing for the armed citizen to do in this instance? Also, should this occur, besides calling 911, what are my legal responsibilities in a instance like this? As always, thank you for making your expertise available to all of us here. We appreciate having you on the forum. :wavey:

Mas Ayoob
05-11-2010, 04:24
Classic example of a short question requiring a long answer! :supergrin: As you saw in the thread you mentioned, this topic elicits divergent advice, in that thread ranging from solid logic to some incredibly stupid and dangerous fantasy.

In my classes, well over an hour is spent on the subtleties of taking dangerous people at gunpoint, because it's actually much more complicated than shooting them. Elements of communication (between you and suspects, others present, responding officers, etc); reading of body language; intimidation factors; control of access/egress lanes, and more that is not usually present in an exchange of gunfire. Obviously, there isn't room here to go into detail on all of it.

Basic rules: if he FLEES (as opposed to an obvious movement toward cover with a gun in his hand), let him go. The reverse crucifixion position (face down, arms out to sides palms up, ankles crossed) is certainly the best, but the trick is getting him to comply with your ordering him into position. NEVER attempt to tie him up or handcuff him. Maintain the maximum distance possible that allows you to watch the hands, still keeping watch for accomplices, and having some cover between you and the perpetrator if you can maneuver to such a position. You want to stay on the line to 911 throughout (make sure you've practiced your one-handed gun work!), and keep your finger out of the trigger guard until you are in the very act of intentionally firing the weapon. This will be a high-stress situation, and there is a high likelihood of something triggering a startle response. Be in a position where you can see the incoming officers in time to holster your weapon, to help prevent a mistaken identity shooting situation.

Short answers to complicated questions are not my forte, but I hope this is of some help.

best,
Mas

NEOH212
05-12-2010, 02:08
Thanks Mas. Don't worry. You did fine and don't feel bad. Short answers aren't my specialty either! Take care sir.