WIRE STRIKE! I never saw those I hit.. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Skyhook
05-19-2010, 06:12
.. they were invisible right up until when they broke through the windscreen and were in the cockpit with me.

http://www.rotor.com/Publications/HAIVideosLibrary/SurvivingtheWiresEnvironment.aspx

gruntmedik
05-19-2010, 18:59
Thanks for posting that.

Skyhook
05-20-2010, 04:59
Thanks for posting that.

:cheers:

The scary part, for me is the amount to which those obstructions- legal and non-legal are popping up.:shocked:

gruntmedik
05-20-2010, 19:48
Ain't that the truth. I'm a Flight Paramedic, not a pilot, but that is one thing we as a crew are vigilant about, is "eyes out" on take-off and landings. It can be very nerve wracking to be landing at an LZ on a night scene. We have a good CRM system in place, and that really helps us when in the critical phase of flight.

dozing4dollars
05-24-2010, 16:29
Environment gets more congested and challenging each year for the low altitude helo drivers and the fast mover military pilots.

The towers themselves have always been a problem and updating or CHUMing your chart is critical to knowing where the newest structures are. More and more cell/comm towers, etc are being erected annually.

More difficult to see are the support or anchoring wires that support the structure. They are virtually invisible when you are smoking thru the weeds at 250-450 knots.

One of my former USAF students ejected out of an A-37 Dragonfly after a wire strike in a canyon in Arizona...never saw the guidewire as it came slicing thru the jet.

Tough flying environment and getting more difficult each year

Z1232K
06-02-2010, 21:07
Wow, scary as all you-know-what!!!

janice6
06-02-2010, 21:37
Too bad their isn't a coating for the wires (during manufacturing) that would interact with the strobe lights to show that something was there.

Careful guys.

TKM
06-02-2010, 22:13
edit..

sns3guppy
06-07-2010, 05:58
Too bad their isn't a coating for the wires (during manufacturing) that would interact with the strobe lights to show that something was there.

A number of coatings or reflective products exist which would do that very thing, but in most cases one has to consider the expense to the manufacturer, and the limited range at which one would see the wire, as well as the uselessness of that feature in daylight or low visibility daylight.

A product which enhances visibility to aircraft means little to non-aviation purchaser. Products which enhance visibility for wires are usually after-market and applied only in locations known to be hotspots for aircraft (near runways, cables crossing large chasms, etc.

Unless the aircraft is moving slowly, there's little or no reaction time for a reflective product to become visible and be identified, when closing on the wire. This means that simply making the wire more visible won't do much. It's not the wire one must watch, but the poles...and the dangerous ones are the long wire runs that have no poles for long distances.

I began flying ag (crop dusting) as a teenager, and have been involved in low altitude operations in various forms for much of my life. Much of that, in mountainous terrain. Wires are always a concern.

Another big concern with wires are guy wires around antennas, or support wires for various structures. These generally extend out at least as far as the structure is tall, and sometimes much farther. They're nearly invisible, nearly always unmarked, and very, very dangerous.

I've done a lot of my low-level flying in reduced or low visibility, often in smoke, sometimes in sand and ash, which means that the ability to see the wire is often very impaired. Visually acquiring the wire in time to take evasive action is often nearly impossible.