Trigger Technique [Archive] - Glock Talk

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CCF
05-22-2010, 17:53
Two questions. I've gotten in the habit of staging the trigger of my Glock. When target shooting, I first take up the slack before starting my slow trigger pull. Is there anything wrong with this practice? I realize a gunfight will be different, but I've been wondering if I should practice something different when at the range.

My other question is regarding what part of your finger goes on the face of the trigger. I naturally use less of my finger (meaning more towards the end of my finger) than most people. I'm a pretty good ways from the "crease" of my finger. Should I be using more of my finger (towards the crease)?

Mas Ayoob
05-23-2010, 07:33
Lots of different theories on this.

Every stage of trigger press takes a little more time as you transition beween the subtly different movements. This is why most champions who run the Glock seem to have gravitated to a single-stage pull.

Many "ride the link" of the sear-plate's reset. That is, they take the trigger three-eighths of an inch from its "at rest" position to the break of the first shot, then allow it to come forward only until it clicks into the reset position, a much shorter distance. There is now only one stage of uniform pressure left to release for each subsequent shot, and less forward and back finger movement, which at least in pure time-and-motion theory is faster.

However, that theory doesn't always pan out. "Riding the link" is a very tactile thing, that requires an educated trigger finger that can feel subtle changes. That sense of touch gets impaired under stress to where sometimes, we can't feel that tiny "tick" of the reset. (Under stress, we experience vasoconstriction, a redistribution of blood flow from the extremities to other parts of the body, impairing the sense of touch.) This can lead to failure to reset, a situation in which the gun will no longer fire.
Fatal to speed scores, and potentially fatal for real to the user in a self-defense situation.

For that reason, many of us have gone to running the Glock trigger as if it was a short double action revolver pull. A single smooth, uninterrupted, straight-back press takes the trigger through its full length of pull each time. It can be done very rapidly with practice, and guarantees that the trigger always resets. Start slow fire, then gradually accelerate your shooting speed, and soon it will become second nature.

Finger placement? On an average size male hand, with a proper grasp of the gun, the pad of the finger (where your fingerprint is) should sit naturally on the face of the trigger. This gives good tactile control for precision shooting, but not necessarily the best leverage for extreme rapid fire. The distal joint of the trigger finger on its palmar surface, if centered on the trigger, will give you that leverage. However, if you have to turn your hand on the gun to get you there, it will leave you in the so-called "h-grip" with just the base of your thumb in line with the gun instead of the whole forearm, and that can compromise recoil control and even reliability.

If you don't have long fingers, you can get closer to that distal joint sweet spot by going with a Glock that has less grip circumference -- the G36, the Gen 4 in its basic form with no spacers attached, the SF series, or a grip trim -- which is one reason why so many experienced Glock shooters like those particular models.

Best of luck,
Mas

CCF
05-23-2010, 11:44
Lots of different theories on this.

Every stage of trigger press takes a little more time as you transition beween the subtly different movements. This is why most champions who run the Glock seem to have gravitated to a single-stage pull.

Many "ride the link" of the sear-plate's reset. That is, they take the trigger three-eighths of an inch from its "at rest" position to the break of the first shot, then allow it to come forward only until it clicks into the reset position, a much shorter distance. There is now only one stage of uniform pressure left to release for each subsequent shot, and less forward and back finger movement, which at least in pure time-and-motion theory is faster.

However, that theory doesn't always pan out. "Riding the link" is a very tactile thing, that requires an educated trigger finger that can feel subtle changes. That sense of touch gets impaired under stress to where sometimes, we can't feel that tiny "tick" of the reset. (Under stress, we experience vasoconstriction, a redistribution of blood flow from the extremities to other parts of the body, impairing the sense of touch.) This can lead to failure to reset, a situation in which the gun will no longer fire.
Fatal to speed scores, and potentially fatal for real to the user in a self-defense situation.

For that reason, many of us have gone to running the Glock trigger as if it was a short double action revolver pull. A single smooth, uninterrupted, straight-back press takes the trigger through its full length of pull each time. It can be done very rapidly with practice, and guarantees that the trigger always resets. Start slow fire, then gradually accelerate your shooting speed, and soon it will become second nature.

Finger placement? On an average size male hand, with a proper grasp of the gun, the pad of the finger (where your fingerprint is) should sit naturally on the face of the trigger. This gives good tactile control for precision shooting, but not necessarily the best leverage for extreme rapid fire. The distal joint of the trigger finger on its palmar surface, if centered on the trigger, will give you that leverage. However, if you have to turn your hand on the gun to get you there, it will leave you in the so-called "h-grip" with just the base of your thumb in line with the gun instead of the whole forearm, and that can compromise recoil control and even reliability.

If you don't have long fingers, you can get closer to that distal joint sweet spot by going with a Glock that has less grip circumference -- the G36, the Gen 4 in its basic form with no spacers attached, the SF series, or a grip trim -- which is one reason why so many experienced Glock shooters like those particular models.

Best of luck,
Mas

Mas,

I really appreciate the detailed responses. Great info.

BTW, I should've mentioned I have big hands, but still tend to place the trigger more towards my fingertip than the joint. That was my concern (whether I need to get more of my finger in it because I have the size to do it).

Thanks, again.

Mas Ayoob
05-23-2010, 14:42
You might want to try 500-1000 rounds at various speeds, then, with distal joint finger placement centered on the trigger. Get back to us if you could, and let us know how it worked for you.

best,
mas

CCF
05-23-2010, 20:42
You might want to try 500-1000 rounds at various speeds, then, with distal joint finger placement centered on the trigger. Get back to us if you could, and let us know how it worked for you.

best,
mas

will do...thanx