Anyone try to cycle hulls through their 1911? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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glock2740
06-04-2010, 22:08
I have a several that will feed 50%. Mostly alloy frames. Since those are my CC 1911's. Question #1...does it hurt/damage the feed ramp? #2...Does it help to polish the hell out of the feed ramp to make the gun feed hulls?

glock360
06-04-2010, 22:42
No idea, Iíve never had a reason to try it.

Why do you want to feed empty cases, for drill purposes?

glock2740
06-04-2010, 23:13
If your gun will feed empties, it'll feed anything.

MD357
06-05-2010, 02:10
Nope, it means nothing either way by my experiences.

Rinspeed
06-05-2010, 04:29
I always thought is was a goofy practice to say the least.

paul45
06-05-2010, 07:36
A foolish internet tale. It means nothing.

tjpet
06-05-2010, 07:53
If your gun will feed empties, it'll feed anything.


Yup, I've read the same thing many times over the years. The only two of my seven 1911s that'll do it: Les Baer Premier II, Taurus PT 1911.

glock2740
06-05-2010, 08:27
The bottom line is that if your gun will cycle empties, I doubt it will ever fail to cycle a live round of any kind.

MD357
06-05-2010, 09:36
The bottom line is that if your gun will cycle empties, I doubt it will ever fail to cycle a live round of any kind.

Just be careful of this philosophy for carry or relaying it to others. I've seen proof otherwise. Mostly, with JHPs but nonetheless, it proved nothing. One should shoot several rounds of what they intend to carry as a surefire way of determining reliability.

jhooten
06-05-2010, 10:01
Had a customer's box stock Charles Daly feed a full mag of empties several times the other day when the dummy rounds went missing.

glock2740
06-05-2010, 10:38
Just be careful of this philosophy for carry or relaying it to others. I've seen proof otherwise. Mostly, with JHPs but nonetheless, it proved nothing. One should shoot several rounds of what they intend to carry as a surefire way of determining reliability.
Probably so, but it just seems that if a gun would run empties, it would feed anything :dunno:It's just a thought I had after seeing some video on you tube.

El_Ron1
06-05-2010, 11:34
Seems like makin' VROOM ROOM! noises on a bicycle to me.

BOGE
06-05-2010, 15:21
Deleted.

RMTactical
06-05-2010, 15:36
Seems like makin' VROOM ROOM! noises on a bicycle to me.

What's wrong with that? I used to do that all the time when I was little. :supergrin:

farscott
06-05-2010, 16:06
My experience has been that if a 1911 will feed empty cases, you now know it will feed empty cases. However, it does not tell you how it will feed any loaded round. I have seen a gun that would cycle empties just fine choke with the first two rounds of the old Speer "flying ashtray".

HAIL CAESAR
06-05-2010, 16:44
Nope, it means nothing either way by my experiences.

A foolish internet tale. It means nothing.

My experience has been that if a 1911 will feed empty cases, you now know it will feed empty cases. However, it does not tell you how it will feed any loaded round. I have seen a gun that would cycle empties just fine choke with the first two rounds of the old Speer "flying ashtray".

Well, you fella's have it pretty well covered.:wavey:

craig_o
06-05-2010, 17:32
If you can dodge a wrench...

SouthpawShootr
06-05-2010, 18:58
There was somebody over at one of the 1911 boards who was propagating the myth that this actually means something. One guy tried it with a Kimber CDP and ended up with having the edges of the brass cut into his feed ramp. The OP got a tongue lashing over it.

1time
06-05-2010, 19:00
A foolish internet tale. It means nothing.

+1
I have a Norinco and an older SA Loaded. Neither will feed a whole mag of any type of ammo I can find. They both feed empties just find. If I could get them to shoot empties I would be on top of the world, imagine the savings. Instead I have two paper weights.

ancient_serpent
06-05-2010, 19:32
The frontal profile of an empty case is markedly different than any bullet profile that I'm aware of. How could anyone reach the conclusion that feeding "empties" means it will feed any cartridge?

Rinspeed
06-05-2010, 20:29
One guy tried it with a Kimber CDP and ended up with having the edges of the brass cut into his feed ramp.




:rofl:

SouthpawShootr
06-05-2010, 20:58
:rofl:

Oh, I wouldn't laugh. Kinda hurts to do something stupid that damages an $1100 gun. I didn't see the point in trying it, since I'm not about to carry ammunition in a pistol without having tried a good amount through it to make sure it runs reliably.

1canvas
06-05-2010, 21:01
30 years ago that is what the thinking was. the two 1911s i had worked on would and would eat anything. my objective was to reliably feed the flying ashtrays [200 grn speers], and they did that 100% of the time. the combat commander that i still have is one of them.

Rinspeed
06-05-2010, 21:02
Oh, I wouldn't laugh. Kinda hurts to do something stupid that damages an $1100 gun.





If you're going to be dumb you gotta be tough.

glock2740
06-05-2010, 22:52
There was somebody over at one of the 1911 boards who was propagating the myth that this actually means something. One guy tried it with a Kimber CDP and ended up with having the edges of the brass cut into his feed ramp. The OP got a tongue lashing over it.
Good point. I was wondering about frame damage to an aluminum frame.

Edmo01
06-06-2010, 06:35
Good point. I was wondering about frame damage to an aluminum frame.

I knew I got a steel frame for a reason...

I'm covered in case I get the urge to cycle empty cases!

Edmo

Fire_Medic
06-06-2010, 07:00
I haven't seen anyone mention this so from a reloaders perspective here's my $0.02:

If the "empty" shells were ones that were previously fired, then it's not a good indicator of anything. Depending on the weapon it was fired from, even if from the same one you're now trying to cycle them through, the brass will be larger in diameter or just deformed compared to a brand new round. When the shells are fired they expand, that's why the first step in reloading is in a sizing die, to bring the brass back to proper specifications for each given caliber.

All that aside, I just don't see how even cycling brand new unfired brass through a gun is indicative of anything at all. You only have half the equation. The projectile is the other half. You could have perfect brass and the rounds be loaded too long and they won't chamber right. The projectile is what will hit the feed ramp, enter the chamber, and sit towards the front of the barrel.

My humble $0.02 :wavey:

faawrenchbndr
06-06-2010, 07:09
F_M makes a darn good point,........

glock2740
06-06-2010, 07:22
I haven't seen anyone mention this so from a reloaders perspective here's my $0.02:

If the "empty" shells were ones that were previously fired, then it's not a good indicator of anything. Depending on the weapon it was fired from, even if from the same one you're now trying to cycle them through, the brass will be larger in diameter or just deformed compared to a brand new round. When the shells are fired they expand, that's why the first step in reloading is in a sizing die, to bring the brass back to proper specifications for each given caliber.

All that aside, I just don't see how even cycling brand new unfired brass through a gun is indicative of anything at all. You only have half the equation. The projectile is the other half. You could have perfect brass and the rounds be loaded too long and they won't chamber right. The projectile is what will hit the feed ramp, enter the chamber, and sit towards the front of the barrel.

My humble $0.02 :wavey:

F_M makes a darn good point,........
Yes he does.

rargos
06-06-2010, 08:50
Why do you want to feed empty cases, for drill purposes?

My Sig P226 will feed empties all day long. It's a great way to test if a shooter is flinching : load a mag with a few randomly placed empties and see if the gun moves when the shooter pulls the trigger on an empty case. The vast majority of people I've tried this with will swear they don't flinch, and then you'll see the gun bob downwards when they pull the trigger.