Trigger question? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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ctfireman
08-02-2010, 21:56
I've always heard about Springfield GI triggers being pretty bad. Either mine is a freak & is great or my loaded Springfield trigger sucks. The break & weight literally feels the same. The metro arms american classic II trigger is better than both, how can that be? Is the trigger on the loaded model adjustable? Seems weird to me. Hopefully you guys get what i'm trying to say.

Jim S.
08-02-2010, 22:07
The loaded is roughly around 5 to 6 lbs.
So is the Mil-spec and G.I. models.
That's why they feel the same.
The loaded has an adjustable trigger for over travel. Not for how heavy it pulls.
I have a Mil-Spec that has a pretty decent trigger. Not great but not bad either.

ctfireman
08-02-2010, 22:12
Ahh ok. I thought the loaded was supposed to be 4-5 & the GI 5-6.

ctfireman
08-02-2010, 22:13
Next question, what do you guys recommend for a super slick trigger set up for my loaded?

CMG
08-03-2010, 02:31
Nothing flat! :supergrin:

I rework my own, so I can't really comment on the various drop-in sets.

rsxr22
08-03-2010, 06:24
Super slick? SVI and EGW's E, and STI make more modernized triggers. wilson, 10-8, EB, etc make more classic looking trigger are all good depends on what look your going for .

Quack
08-03-2010, 07:22
get some stones, sear jig and feeler gauge's and do your own trigger work.

if you are looking for the trigger itself, there are plenty to choose from.

i say join the flat revolution!!!

Quack
08-03-2010, 07:22
Nothing flat! :super-grin:



Hater :tongueout:

ctfireman
08-03-2010, 08:25
I actually like the flat look. As far as re-working it, i have no experience so i'd have someone do it.

BayouGlocker
08-03-2010, 08:35
Just to jump in here with questions of my own, how far do you need to go with a trigger job? Just get the trigger and bend/pull on the factory springs? Or for a novice, would it be better to get an "action" or "trigger pull" set?

Also how hard is it to install a "tactical" or ambi mag release or a beavertail?

I'm looking at the Midway catalogue and they say triggers, hammers, and all sorts of stuff require gunsmith installation....

FLIPPER 348
08-03-2010, 08:44
I've always heard about Springfield GI triggers being pretty bad. .


you hear lots of goofy things on the internet

Quack
08-03-2010, 09:04
Just to jump in here with questions of my own, how far do you need to go with a trigger job? Just get the trigger and bend/pull on the factory springs? Or for a novice, would it be better to get an "action" or "trigger pull" set?

Also how hard is it to install a "tactical" or ambi mag release or a beavertail?

I'm looking at the Midway catalogue and they say triggers, hammers, and all sorts of stuff require gunsmith installation....

Drop-in beavertails won't look like the fitted ones.
Trigger jobs require jig, stones, file and feller gauges.
You can have 2 guns with 4# triggers, but feel different. The one that feels lighter is the one with the better sear/hammer engagement.

Ambience safety isn't hard to do, most just need file/stoning where the safety blocks the sear.

Trey83
08-03-2010, 10:25
Drop-in beavertails won't look like the fitted ones.
Trigger jobs require jig, stones, file and feller gauges.
You can have 2 guns with 4# triggers, but feel different. The one that feels lighter is the one with the better sear/hammer engagement.

Ambience safety isn't hard to do, most just need file/stoning where the safety blocks the sear.

Isn't that close to $200 worth of tools?

Quack
08-03-2010, 10:53
It'll be less than $100

Trey83
08-03-2010, 10:59
That isn't too bad.

CMG
08-03-2010, 16:02
Ed Brown makes an inexpensive jig for stoning sears, and it works great.

Hammers are a bit easier to do without a jig, but a good jig makes it a breeze (unfortunately those jigs aren't inexpensive). I have a Powers Series II setup that works great, but stoned quite a few hammers using a good vise, and more care.

If you don't want to do all that, several parts makers offer hammer/sear kits that replace both parts with already stoned re-placements. Again, I have no experience with any of them, but have read many folks get good results that way.

Most triggers require a very small amount of fitting (if any at all). The bow may need a bit of stoning to fit the track in the frame and move smoothly. Many triggers drop right in with not fitting at all. Others require the rear contact surface be stoned to fit as well as the bow.

Good luck.

DRAGON1970
08-04-2010, 06:21
get some stones, sear jig and feeler gauge's and do your own trigger work.

if you are looking for the trigger itself, there are plenty to choose from.

i say join the flat revolution!!!


+1....get the tools and do it yourself. You will learn alot.

CMG
08-04-2010, 08:49
+1....get the tools and do it yourself. You will learn alot.

If you do, in order to alleviate a source of frustration, order two sears and two hammers, just in case the learning curve causes you to crash the first time! :supergrin: