Touching Primers.. [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Touching Primers..


Bello
08-03-2010, 16:03
is there a real big deal about touching primers? is it bad to do it?

usmc4641
08-03-2010, 16:08
some will say that you can cause an oily buildup which may cause the primer to not function properly. I would say that minimal handling would be ok

DoctaGlockta
08-03-2010, 16:09
is there a real big deal about touching primers? is it bad to do it?
http://a5.vox.com/6a00cdf7ed27ab094f010980c4625d000b-500pi

Hammer says no.

Seriously, I have personally touch many and lived to tell the tale. Don't make a habit of it but if one falls on the floor or bench I pick it up.

Memnok
08-03-2010, 16:10
I do it as little as possible, but a little light petting will not hurt them. I wouldn't put one in my mouth and chew it though. :shocked:

GioaJack
08-03-2010, 16:14
Obviously it depends on the age of the primer and if the touching is consensual.


Jack

Memnok
08-03-2010, 16:20
Obviously it depends on the age of the primer and if the touching is consensual.


Jack

:rofl::rofl:

Bello
08-03-2010, 17:06
believe it or not i used to only read general glocking and log off but what others dont know is in the reloading forum we got a bunch of fun guys hiding out...best kept secret so far on glocktalk lol.. my question was for i have a lee single stage press and i picked up a lee auto powder measure for it so i was kinda figuring expand my cases and drop powder and then bring down and prime but my thots got me scared thinking if i overprimed id bring my face down so i re thot and was like maybe ill pick up a primer press prime it and up stroke the expand and drop powder

Memnok
08-03-2010, 18:03
...i was kinda figuring expand my cases and drop powder and then bring down and prime ...

You can't drop powder before you seat the primer unless you want the powder to leak out of the primer pocket.

Olivers_AR
08-03-2010, 18:14
Yes you can actually even seat the bullet with powder dropping out. :brickwall:

A public service announcement, wear eye protection when you reload. :cool:

ETA: Use a set of tweezers and you won't have to touch then directly. A little handling of the outside cup is ok, similar to when you load a round in a magazine.

You can't drop powder before you seat the primer unless you want the powder to leak out of the primer pocket.

DWARREN123
08-03-2010, 18:18
I touch them as little as possible. Use common sense and have a nice day.

rg1
08-03-2010, 19:20
Hope it's ok because I've handled and touched thousands since starting loading in the early 80's. I pick up from my primer flipper tray and set the primers in the primer punch cup. I do have primer tubes and use them when priming large lots but see no issues picking up primers and placing them in the primer seating cup. I do have clean hands, no case lube on the fingers, plus no sweating and my skin oils are not acidic. Some peoples skin oils or perspiration are acidic. It's not easy to "kill" a primer even when trying to do so with oils etc. and I can't see any concern by handling them. Don't drop powder before priming!!!

WiskyT
08-03-2010, 19:34
Yes you can actually even seat the bullet with powder dropping out. :brickwall:

A public service announcement, wear eye protection when you reload. :cool:

ETA: Use a set of tweezers and you won't have to touch then directly. A little handling of the outside cup is ok, similar to when you load a round in a magazine.

Fine powders like Bullseye WILL leak out of a flash hole if there is no primer in place.

Touching primers is okay. I load 30-06 on a single stage and touch every single primer. I tried to miracle them into the primer seater, but it didn't work.

HAMMERHEAD
08-03-2010, 21:44
I've touched all of mine for the past four years (prime on press without a tube). I try to make sure my hands are clean and dry.
Never had a problem, but it might be more of an issue for long term storage.

fredj338
08-03-2010, 23:09
I've touched all of mine for the past four years (prime on press without a tube). I try to make sure my hands are clean and dry.
Never had a problem, but it might be more of an issue for long term storage.
DING, DING! We have a winner! I wouldn't clean my guns or change the oil in my car & then reload w/o washing my hands. If you wash your hands before reloading, there will be little to no oils left to contaminate primers. I do it all the time, drop a primer here or there, no issues.:dunno:

Memnok
08-03-2010, 23:24
Fine powders like Bullseye WILL leak out of a flash hole if there is no primer in place.

Touching primers is okay. I load 30-06 on a single stage and touch every single primer. I tried to miracle them into the primer seater, but it didn't work.

BL-C(2) will too. I know from experience. :supergrin:

john58
08-04-2010, 05:13
If you do touch them, don't tell your wife she might have a jealousy issue.:supergrin:

Gunnut 45/454
08-04-2010, 08:46
GioaJack
I guess I'm a primer perv then cause I handle all my primers while reloading!! Us single stage guys are kind of weird that way! And I don't ask if it's ok!:rofl:

BuckyP
08-04-2010, 08:50
My automatic primer loader (AKA, my wife) uses her finger to flip them over if they didn't flip properly in the flip tray. So far I've had no issues. However, when I load the tubes, I use the corner of the tube to flip them.

GioaJack
08-04-2010, 09:20
In actuality you stand a better chance of reading a Korean newspaper than you do contaminating a primer with your hands.

This is not to say that you should make a habit of carrying a pinch of them between you cheek and gum but in all likelihood they would still go off... just maybe not when you want them to.


Jack

unclebob
08-04-2010, 09:45
Back in the days when Jack thinks I was walking around with Mosses. I picked up every primer and put it in the Lee hand-priming tool. No trays or tubes too put primers in etc. Every thing I read said not too use the press for priming. So the next best thing at the time was the Lee hand priming tool. I never had one that would not go off.
Put a couple of primers in WD40 and everyday put one in a case and fire it. It takes a couple of days before it well not fire. And that is soaking it in the stuff.
So picking up the primers by hand, as long as you wash your hands before doing so you should not have any problem.

November Sunrise
08-04-2010, 09:48
Is it safe to re-seat the primer after finishing the round if you find the primer isnt all the way seated? Common sence tells me no but then again i am new to this.

unclebob
08-04-2010, 10:04
Is it safe to re-seat the primer after finishing the round if you find the primer isnt all the way seated? Common sence tells me no but then again i am new to this.


Put it this way what would happen if you set off the primer? I know someone is going too say they do it all the time and nothing has happened. But then they never have set off a primer in doing so. Common since says you do not do it.

GioaJack
08-04-2010, 10:06
Is it safe to re-seat the primer after finishing the round if you find the primer isnt all the way seated? Common sence tells me no but then again i am new to this.


Can it be done, of course. Is it safe, probably not any more safe than those whacko's in India who lean in and kiss a King Cobra on the top of the head.

Why would you do it, to save a few cents? What's your deductible for an emergency room visit, or at the very least the cost of a new pair of underwear? (If you go commando we don't want to hear about it.)

If you use a hand prime method do you really want a round igniting while your thumb and fingers are just below it? If you're priming in a press and a die is just above the round you have created a quasi pressure barrel where, depending on the proximity can replicate the barrel of your gun. Not really the ideal situation.

If the primer didn't seal correctly the first time there is a good chance the pocket is irregular, (partial crimp remaining, piece of tumbling media between web and primer, any number of scenarios) and will take above normal pressure to finish seating it. Let me see, what do you call a piece of metal applying enough pressure to ignite a primer... oh yeah, a firing pin.

If budget is so tight that you can't afford to tear down a problem round you might consider taking up a cheaper hobby, such as bird watching or in lieu of that have one of your ex-wives reseat your primers. :whistling:


Jack

unclebob
08-04-2010, 10:22
Take a single burner electric hot plate. Put a round standing up on it put a cardboard box over it, then plug it in. Then see if you still want too reseat a primer.
Like what Jack said. Why did it not go in the first time?
It does not always take a sharp blow to set off the primer.

dsmw5142
08-04-2010, 10:36
I swish them around in my mouth to see if they are magnum or not :rollingeyes:

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 11:06
Is it safe to re-seat the primer after finishing the round if you find the primer isnt all the way seated? Common sence tells me no but then again i am new to this.

Common sense tells me that if the primer didn't go off when priming the case initially, the odds of it going off when pressing on it again to seat correctly are pretty slim. Be careful and wear protective glasses just in case.

glockaviator
08-04-2010, 11:10
I would take the round apart and start over. A primer going off with powder and bullet in it while I am working on it? Man, there goes a hand or eye. At least it's POSSIBLE for a bad one. Play it safe. Don't do it. If you don't have a bullet puller, get one.

unclebob
08-04-2010, 11:36
Common sense tells me that if the primer didn't go off when priming the case initially, the odds of it going off when pressing on it again to seat correctly are pretty slim. Be careful and wear protective glasses just in case.


Based on what common since? If the primer did not go in the first time, did you ask yourself why it did not go in? There is some reason why. Like a piece of media.
Of all of loading the primer is the sensitive and dangers of all the other components in loading

PCJim
08-04-2010, 16:07
November, your common sense is telling you correctly - never try to reseat a primer on a live round.

Pssst... Since no one else told you this, I'll be the first - attempting that feat will immediately nominate you for the current year Darwin Awards.

unclebob
08-04-2010, 16:25
Then you have people wonder why there are so many warnings and disclaimers on reloading components. Because they have on control of how people well use their products. If they didnít have it someone would sue and come up with the excuse that no one told them. I guess now dayís common since does not play in the equation.

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 18:43
November, your common sense is telling you correctly - never try to reseat a primer on a live round.

Pssst... Since no one else told you this, I'll be the first - attempting that feat will immediately nominate you for the current year Darwin Awards.

No, it won't. At most you might get some scratches and possibly something in your eye if you aren't wearing safety glasses but you aren't going to be killed by it.

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 18:46
Based on what common since? If the primer did not go in the first time, did you ask yourself why it did not go in? There is some reason why. Like a piece of media.
Of all of loading the primer is the sensitive and dangers of all the other components in loading

It's sense, the word is sense, not since.

If anything it could be seated short because the operator didn't give a full pull.

GioaJack
08-04-2010, 19:17
It's sense, the word is sense, not since.

If anything it could be seated short because the operator didn't give a full pull.


You want to get personal with our friend... I'll play your game.

You based your original statement on 'common sense', indicating that if a primer didn't ignite while initially seating it wouldn't ignite while trying to reseat it.

It's common sense like this that causes people to starve to death if you lock them in a Safeway overnight.

'Common sense' would tell you that loaders rely, either consciously or sub-consciously, on muscle memory, the ability to detect that an often performed activity is requiring more or less force than normal.

It would be perfectly normal for a loader to cease trying to seat a primer if muscle memory tells him, or her, that it is taking more pressure than normal to complete the operation.

A loader with 'common sense' would investigate the cause of the problem and either rectify it and continue or decide that any action would not be cost or time effective and toss the case.

A decapping pin that has become loose in it's collet will wobble, possibly resulting in it scraping the side of the flash hole and producing a small protrusion of brass into the underside of the flash hole. That simple act, which would probably only be detected through muscle memory is enough to keep a primer from being seated fully.

In your scenario it's damn the torpedos, full speed ahead. A smart and conscientious loader uses intellect and 'common sense' instead of brute force and ignorance to correct the problem.


Jack

n2extrm
08-04-2010, 19:35
No, it won't. At most you might get some scratches and possibly something in your eye if you aren't wearing safety glasses but you aren't going to be killed by it.


Actually you are dead wrong here. The case is not in any way able to contain the pressure inside of a case if it is not in the chamber. In fact it is the chamber that contains and supports the pressure the brass is only pressed against it to seal it. Not to mention if the bullet was released you have no idea what direction any pieces are headed and what fragments will come off of what parts and head in unknown directions. If you think for a moment that a leather glove, or safety glasses are going to save you, I would rethink the forces in motion here.

As for the logic that "if it did not go off the first time it won't the second time." Well I guess that would mean it would not go off when fired by that logic.

It makes no sense to try and save 50 cents and push a primer into a loaded case.

Colorado4Wheel
08-04-2010, 19:38
Is it safe to re-seat the primer after finishing the round if you find the primer isnt all the way seated? Common sence tells me no but then again i am new to this.

I have done a lot of stupid things in my life. That is not one of them I am willing to attempt.

unclebob
08-04-2010, 19:40
Boy Jack you must be bored.
Since or sense did you know what I meant? I well assume you did. At 64 years old I donít really give a rats you know what. In someone tell me how too spell. Tell some one else who give you know what. I was never good at spelling and I donít think that I well change. Not in this life time at least.
Iím bored too. Just loaded 200 rds of 12 gauge. Today the EPA closed down our skeet range, again.

n2extrm
08-04-2010, 19:46
Bello

I (as others have stated) touched primers all the time. I load alot of rifle on a single stage and pick up every primer and place it in the cup. I just shot some stuff Sunday that was loaded 2 years ago that way and every one was fine. I Do was my hands and dry them before I handle primers.

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 19:47
Jack, I wasn't saying to just ram away. Just that it's not likely to cause it to go off. There would have to be something on the priming punch that could create the pressure necessary to set off the primer. Primers don't just go off on their own.

I'm not just talking out of my butt, either. I had the same concerns after a factory round exploded while sitting in the factory carton as the primer had been hit by a case that had just ejected from my pistol at the shooting range. To satisfy my curiosity about possible mishaps while loading my own ammo, I did some tests to see if there was much to worry about. I was quite satisfied that nothing happened and proved to me that primers are tough little buggers except when hit by firing pins, sharp objects and sucked into vacuum cleaners some times.

Learning is fun :)

unclebob
08-04-2010, 19:48
Lets see if I played Russian Roulette 100 times. With that logic I guess some people might thank. Well I did 100 times and nothing happened. It must be okay for another 100 tryís
God gave you gray matter use it..

390ish
08-04-2010, 19:49
i pour them into my hand 20 at a time, then feed them into the top of my forster as needed. been doing it this way for years.

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 19:52
Actually you are dead wrong here. The case is not in any way able to contain the pressure inside of a case if it is not in the chamber. In fact it is the chamber that contains and supports the pressure the brass is only pressed against it to seal it. Not to mention if the bullet was released you have no idea what direction any pieces are headed and what fragments will come off of what parts and head in unknown directions. If you think for a moment that a leather glove, or safety glasses are going to save you, I would rethink the forces in motion here.

As for the logic that "if it did not go off the first time it won't the second time." Well I guess that would mean it would not go off when fired by that logic.

It makes no sense to try and save 50 cents and push a primer into a loaded case.

Actually, I'm probably the only one here that knows for a fact what happens when a live round is set off while it's sitting in the box next to them :rofl:

The bullet isn't going anywhere more than a few inches from the exploded casing.

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i126/BadAndys5oh/Guns/S7300427.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i126/BadAndys5oh/Guns/S7300435.jpg

FYI, there's a HUGE difference between a priming punch that's as wide as the primer being pushed with a little bit of pressure and a firing pin that makes a significant mark in the primer from the spring loaded force.

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 19:56
Lets see if I played Russian Roulette 100 times. With that logic I guess some people might thank. Well I did 100 times and nothing happened. It must be okay for another 100 tryís
God gave you gray matter use it..

Comparing Russian roulette to pressing on a primer more than once? Quit being childish.

Colorado4Wheel
08-04-2010, 19:57
So if you throw a live round in a fire and it explodes are you in danger?

If I get a .22 in my smelting pot and it cooks off am I in danger?

n2extrm
08-04-2010, 20:02
Actually, I'm probably the only one here that knows for a fact what happens when a live round is set off while it's sitting in the box next to them :rofl:

The bullet isn't going anywhere more than a few inches from the exploded casing.

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i126/BadAndys5oh/Guns/S7300427.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i126/BadAndys5oh/Guns/S7300435.jpg

FYI, there's a HUGE difference between a priming punch that's as wide as the primer being pushed with a little bit of pressure and a firing pin that makes a significant mark in the primer from the spring loaded force.


I am not going to argue with you or your pictures. The logic that an ejected case can set off a primer and a seating punch cannot is enough for me.

You got lucky in your case that you did not get hurt.

I can tell you I have never seen anyone set off a round while repirming a case. I also know how much potential energy is inside a case full of fast burning gun powder. I can also say that in 10+ years as a paramedic I have seen people injured in unspeakable ways by less. It usually is not the one the thing that goes wrong, its when 3 line up that things get real sticky.

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 20:05
The fire would have to be hot enough first and one round isn't going to hurt you unless you're in the fire with it...and at that point you should be more concerned about being on fire. A loose round of ammo isn't a stick of dynamite, hand grenade or even close to it.

If I had a smelting pot, I would put a .22 in it just to find out for you.

unclebob
08-04-2010, 20:06
Granted the bullet is not going very far. But look at the case. Is all of the case there and where is the primer?
And no you do not need a firing pin too set off a round.
We use too throw 4 round clip of 40MM form the trailer too someone inside the door of the aircraft. One night a round came out of the clip and went off. Not a thing anywhere around that could be used as a firing pin was around. The ladder is flat and round and the tarmac is flat.

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 20:07
I am not going to argue with you or your pictures. The logic that an ejected case can set off a primer and a seating punch cannot is enough for me.

You got lucky in your case that you did not get hurt.

I can tell you I have never seen anyone set off a round while repirming a case. I also know how much potential energy is inside a case full of fast burning gun powder. I can also say that in 10+ years as a paramedic I have seen people injured in unspeakable ways by less. It usually is not the one the thing that goes wrong, its when 3 line up that things get real sticky.

Does your seating punch do this to primers? If so, you should look into getting it fixed.

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i126/BadAndys5oh/Guns/S7300431.jpg

jdavionic
08-04-2010, 20:10
If you're married, make sure others are in the room when you touch them to ensure you have witnesses to your appropriate actions. Generally though, it's a bad idea. It all starts with a touch...next thing you know, you've got one in your bed.

Remember though...if you do go down that path, wear protection. Take no chances...gloves, goggles,...

Colorado4Wheel
08-04-2010, 20:12
http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i126/BadAndys5oh/Guns/S7300431.jpg

Admit it, you fired that out of a Glock.

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 20:12
Granted the bullet is not going very far. But look at the case. Is all of the case there and where is the primer?
And no you do not need a firing pin too set off a round.
We use too throw 4 round clip of 40MM form the trailer too someone inside the door of the aircraft. One night a round came out of the clip and went off. Not a thing anywhere around that could be used as a firing pin was around. The ladder is flat and round and the tarmac is flat.

That's the whole case. The bullet barely moved and it was in that spot because I moved it there after pulling out the rest of the ammo from that carton. I heard it go off about 2' away from my right side. It sounded like a weak firecracker with my ear muffs on.

My point was that you need pressure on the primer in a certain way to set it off. The seating punch is the same size as the primer. It's a completely flat surface pushing on the primer.

BadAndy
08-04-2010, 20:14
Admit it, you fired that out of a Glock.

Steyr M40-A1, actually :tongueout:

That happened because the old style extractor was throwing brass straight up out of the pistol and it was throwing them hard. One piece ricocheted off the metal part of the ceiling and hit the primer at just the perfect spot.

Colorado4Wheel
08-04-2010, 20:15
My point was that you need pressure on the primer in a certain way to set it off. The seating punch is the same size as the primer. It's a completely flat surface pushing on the primer.

That is not always true. They can go off in a primer tube by tapping it hard enough. A Grand Master Lost a finger doing just that. It does not need a firing pin.

unclebob
08-04-2010, 20:27
I have set off 3 primers in my 650 press by just seating the primer using the primer seating punch. I know a person that has set off all of the primers in the primer magazine by seating primers. So donít tell me a primer punch is not going too set off the primer.


Sorry Jack just had too do it.

GioaJack
08-04-2010, 20:39
BadAndy:

Although primers are designed to be ignited by a firing pin, or striker if you're a plastic sissy gun kind of guy, that is by no means the only stimuli that will cause ignition, detonation if you will.

The below picture depicts the detonation of a single primer with resulting sympathetic detonations of subsequent primers. The bottom most primer, the first detonation was not struck by a firing pin or anything that resembles one nor was it struck on the flat portion of the cup. Rather, it was struck on the 'side' of the cup and with relatively little force supplied by a small spring attached to the primer slide pick-up on a C and H inline progressive.

Is it hard to set off a primer without a direct firing pin strike? No, not at all. For many, many years, beforE ATF lost their sense of humor we regularly, and intentionally turned our 1911's into full auto by seating high primers. A normal round is loaded on top of high primer rounds. Rack the slide, take a normal shot and hold on for the roller coaster ride. Does the firing pin detonate the rest of the rounds, no, it merely takes the breech face closing into battery to detonate the primer. No firing pin, no sharp pointy object... a flat piece of metal. Actually very similar to applying too much force to a primer punch.

Throw a round into a fire, no big deal, great fun actually, unless it rolls between two tightly packed bricks that are in there to maintain heat. Now instead of a 'pop' you've created a pressure barrel. Enough to replicate a gun barrel, no, unless you're the unluckiest guy on earth but certainly enough pressure to raise velocities to a dangerous level.

Oh, BTW, if you're going to drop a .22 into a pot of molten lead you're going to need one of two things, a lot of distance from the pot or really good health insurance because you're going to have a volcano of skin searing material.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_4096.jpg?1280974439

Jack

Max1775
08-04-2010, 21:19
That is not always true. They can go off in a primer tube by tapping it hard enough. A Grand Master Lost a finger doing just that. It does not need a firing pin.

Yep. He's not the only one to do it either. Respect the primer...

Cobra64
08-04-2010, 23:52
is there a real big deal about touching primers? is it bad to do it?

:upeyes:

BadAndy
08-05-2010, 05:51
Tapping it hard enough with what? And how hard do you really need to tap the tube?

Jack, I'm not dumb enough to drop anything into a pot of any kind of molten metal! Except more of what's already in there of course. He said into a smelting pot, nothing about it being full of lead :)

Colorado4Wheel
08-05-2010, 07:20
Tapping it hard enough with what? And how hard do you really need to tap the tube?


I think anything past 6.8lbs. :rofl:

Seriously, what difference does it make. You simply don't do it.

unclebob
08-05-2010, 08:27
Tapping it hard enough with what? And how hard do you really need to tap the tube?


Evidently hard enough too set off a primer. In turn sets off the rest of the primers.

BadAndy
08-05-2010, 08:34
That's why I asked how hard and with what. I've accidentally hit my full primer tube with my steel target stand pretty hard and nothing happened other than making me worry that it might have bent the tube.

unclebob
08-05-2010, 08:53
That's why I asked how hard and with what. I've accidentally hit my full primer tube with my steel target stand pretty hard and nothing happened other than making me worry that it might have bent the tube.


Just because you hit the target stand, does not mean a thing. You could hit it again with half as much force but at a different angle and it goes off. You can drop it on the floor 100 times and nothing happens. 101 and it goes off. There are just too many variables in why they can go off. That is what I was trying too get at with the Russian roulette.

BadAndy
08-05-2010, 09:04
I see what you're saying.

Colorado4Wheel
08-05-2010, 09:32
Thats why I said 6.8 lbs jokingly. It might take a 20 lb hit one time and one way and a 3 lb hit would set it off another way. You just don't know and simply don't risk it.

PCJim
08-05-2010, 09:42
to get this thread back on the OP's topic.....

I plan to run an experiment with a few primers, soaking two lots of them - one in water and the other in WD-40 for up to a week. I've read other's test reports that neither water or WD-40 will neutralize a primer once the primer has dried back out. I plan to test this and put it to rest....

unclebob
08-05-2010, 09:43
I see what you're saying.

Apology accepted for calling me childish. But then I guess Iím in my second childhood.

unclebob
08-05-2010, 09:46
to get this thread back on the OP's topic.....

I plan to run an experiment with a few primers, soaking two lots of them - one in water and the other in WD-40 for up to a week. I've read other's test reports that neither water or WD-40 will neutralize a primer once the primer has dried back out. I plan to test this and put it to rest....
I did that test about 2 or 3 years ago using WD40. Did not try water.

PCJim
08-05-2010, 10:05
I did that test about 2 or 3 years ago using WD40. Did not try water.

Bob, care to give us your results with the WD-40?

What I've read regarding water is that if the primer is wet, it will not fire. Once the primer has dried out, it will fire as though it was never wet.

unclebob
08-05-2010, 10:50
If I remember right. The first day was about no change. I tried them about every 2 hours when I was awake. The second day they were weaker but still fired. The third day they did not fire. Took them out of the WD40 and put them on a paper towel. The second day they fired but weak. The third day they were about or back too normal. This is just by going by the sound that they were making. Might add I have terrible hearing and memory.
They also varied from what brand of primers that were being used. What ever the brand is that has a red coating over the primer took a little bit longer.
Like I said it has been a couple of years that I did this, And Iím going from memory.
Try it and see if you come up with the same results.
I put the primers in a jar and sprayed WD40 on them until they were completely covered.

PCJim
08-05-2010, 11:06
Based on your test, you obtained the same results as what I've read would occur with water immersion. I had meant to begin the soak last night but was more concerned with some brass storage problems and didn't get around to the test. I'll set a reminder in my electronic brain to get that test started tonight.