Storage info... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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utah
08-12-2010, 19:58
How important is it to keep reloading components (powder and primers) in a climate controlled area? I ask because I have a lot of equipment and components (I could start my own store) and Iím thinking about purchasing a pre-built shed and making that my reloading area. Was also thinking about putting a small climate unit in if and this is a BIG if the cost isnít too high. I think I can get all of it in a 12x12 and have a lot of room left. Yes I know it would have to be insulated and wired. Also any idea what the floor loading is for one of those? Worst case if it burns Iím only out whatís in it and not my house

Colorado4Wheel
08-12-2010, 20:21
Virginia? What part? Water is a real issue out there. It's not unusual to build it on blocks and let it breath below the shed. You need treated otherwise it will rot. Better option would be to pour a small slab and put it on a slab. Make sure it's elevated and has good drainage away from the slab. 6" in 10 feet the least you want all the way around it.

PCJim
08-12-2010, 21:10
Problem is that if you pour a slab, you are required in most jurisdictions to pull a permit which will in turn cause the shed to become a taxable unit. If placed on 6x6 PT or creosoted ties you escape the permit requirement. Power can be in the form of a permanent line or heavy duty 12/3 extension cord. I've done both on the electrical side.

OP, if you install a window shaker a/c unit, you should have adequate heat and humidity control for the summer. Winter should not pose a problem as the humidity drops significantly. Insulation will be required to keep energy costs under control and to provide a comfortable area for reloading.

Back when I began reloading in '82, I reloaded in a backyard shed. No a/c made summer reloading a hot event and a small fan was a blessing. Other seasons were quite comfortable. Even with primers and powder in the shed, I never had a problem with failing components.

Colorado4Wheel
08-13-2010, 11:41
So your solution to not pulling a permit is to make it even less safe? None of this is really that hard. You will pay under $3 a ft for concrette. Undergound conduit is not hard to run. Running that to your circuit breaker should not be that hard. As the home owner you are allowed to pull these permits your self.

No matter what I would pour some sort of footers below frost depth to prevent the thing from moving around. I would run some perment power underground in a safe fashion. I would insulate it with R13 on the walls and as much as you can get in the cealing. OR depending on design the entire shed might just need to be conditioned space (still put as much insulation under the shingles as possible). Don't forget to properly vent the attic if you end up with one.

GioaJack
08-13-2010, 12:58
So your solution to not pulling a permit is to make it even less safe? None of this is really that hard. You will pay under $3 a ft for concrette. Undergound conduit is not hard to run. Running that to your circuit breaker should not be that hard. As the home owner you are allowed to pull these permits your self.

No matter what I would pour some sort of footers below frost depth to prevent the thing from moving around. I would run some perment power underground in a safe fashion. I would insulate it with R13 on the walls and as much as you can get in the cealing. OR depending on design the entire shed might just need to be conditioned space (still put as much insulation under the shingles as possible). Don't forget to properly vent the attic if you end up with one.


Ifyou did all that wouldn't it be called... ah, oh yeah... CABELAS.


Jack

unclebob
08-13-2010, 13:02
If you think a 12X12 well be big enough. If you are like the rest of us or most of use itís not. That is about the size of my reloading room in the house and it is in no way big enough.

PCJim
08-13-2010, 13:47
My first "reloading shed" was stick built (2x4"s with T111 siding) as opposed to the cinder block/poured walls that I am so now familiar with in the hurricane belt. Self designed and built, and yes, I pulled a permit (it was VERY conspicious from the street). The 4" slab was 10x16, with the building 10x12 and a 4' overhang front for appearance. A 10' workbench on opposing sides provided plenty of working room. I used a heavy, construction grade 12/3 extension cord for power before I installed the underground line.

Then again, what works for one does not always work for another.

Colorado4Wheel
08-13-2010, 14:38
It works. I just don't think it's a good plan to use a extension cord to run the power. Especailly just laying it on the ground.

IndyGunFreak
08-13-2010, 15:08
It works. I just don't think it's a good plan to use a extension cord to run the power. Especailly just laying it on the ground.

I agree w/ this... at if you need to bury the conduit, and pull the proper wire through(a knucklehead could do that), and call an electrician to do the rest.