Pregnancy and shooting? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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emt1581
08-24-2010, 19:20
I figure this would be better to ask here than at the OB/GYN. But for those with any experience, is it ok to shoot when you're pregnant? I'm thinking the two main issues would be the noise and the recoil (or long guns).

Are trips to the range put on hold when there's a bun in the oven?

Thanks!

-Emt1581

Glockin26
08-24-2010, 22:27
Do not under any circumstances shoot a gun while pregnant. Its a combination of noise and the shockwave from shooting. You are also exposed to lead and other harmful contaminates in the air as well as loading ammunition. Put the guns up for a while and focus on whats important.

You can do serious damage to your unborn child!

Mrs.Cicero
08-25-2010, 06:06
Do not under any circumstances shoot a gun while pregnant. Its a combination of noise and the shockwave from shooting. You are also exposed to lead and other harmful contaminates in the air as well as loading ammunition. Put the guns up for a while and focus on whats important.

You can do serious damage to your unborn child!

Where are the scientific studies that show any statistically significant risk from the noise or "shockwave" ?

I stopped shooting indoors when I was pregnant because of the potential lead issue. Mr.C cleaned all my guns and reloaded all my ammo. But I still shot outside... in fact, I went on an elk hunt in AZ early in my first pregnancy. Both of my children are normal, healthy little girls w/o health issues of any kind.

The directive to "put up the guns and focus on [motherhood]" as if we haven't the brains to think about anything else while pregnant is both condescending and insulting.

Mrs.Cicero

fuzzy03cls
08-25-2010, 07:21
Don't know, but there was a pregnant woman at the outdoor range I went too about a few weeks ago. She didn't seem to have any issues. Her husband didn't seem to mind either. They had a .308 & some handguns.

Mrs. Tink
08-25-2010, 09:45
My friend who was expecting two years ago inquired with her doctor if she could join our big shooting trip with work colleagues. He told her that the lead exposure and the noise made it inadvisable.

vafish
08-25-2010, 10:13
http://iweb.tntech.edu/cpardue/pregnant.html

Just one little quote from the article:

Numerous studies demonstrate that exposure to noise during pregnancy,has been linked to such disorders as miscarriage, intrauterinegrowth retardation, premature delivery (less than 37 weeks), decreased birth weight, hearing loss in babies and children, altered immune response in the fetus and hypertension during pregnancy (a potentially severe disorder). Interestingly, one study showed that a combined exposure to noise and lead seemed to have an increased toxicity,causing heart lesions, which was not observed for either of those agents in isolation. The question again, is "how relevant are the studies to our very specific question?" The answer again, is "we just don't know." Is it something we want to chance?


As a firearms instructor I advise pregnant women not to take my classes.

Fundamentals
08-25-2010, 10:57
I have had information from a Firearms Instructors Manual from a Federal
Agency (U.S. Secret Service), on Firearms and Exsposure To Lead. I quote
from the manual section on "Special Risks": Pregnant women are vunerable
to rapid absorption of lead, along with calcium from the blood into the bone. This is a result of hormonal changes caused by pregnancy. In pregnant women, lead passes unimpeded through the placenta to the fetus, potentially causing birth defects or miscarriage: Now to what degree
of exposure is minimal and high can only be determined by blood test on
a regular basis for the amount of shooting the individual is actually engaged in. I would hedge on to the side of caution and cease the
shooting activity as my wife did for her two times she was pregnant. Also
her doctor advised to cease. I was a very active PPC competitor and at
some matches the wives and girlfriends would shoot the Powder Puff
Matches, which I felt the exsposure to lead was far more risky than say
a casual visit to a range one time. What is the old saying, "An ounce of
prevention is worth more than a pound of cure". If I remember correctly,
the Half Life of lead dose absorbed into human bone is approximatley
20 years.

Mrs.Cicero
08-25-2010, 11:37
http://iweb.tntech.edu/cpardue/pregnant.html
Just one little quote from the article:


Another quote from the same article...Unfortunately, there are no definitive studies that clearly answer this question. I can cherry-pick, too.

If you are personally concerned, take a bit of time and Google the topic. I did this and discovered that the two studies I could find referenced that concerned humans in utero, were concerned with long-term exposure to loud noises - that is, daily factory work, and living next to an airport. These were NOT experimental designs, just retrospective reporting by the mothers. I could find no studies that referenced an occasional hour shooting by pregnant women. There is a large number of studies on babies in NICU and what noise exposure does to them, but again, they are about constant exposure, the babies aren't healthy to start with, and they are obviously NOT in utero, which provides some noise barrier and significantly alters the babies' stress hormone levels. (Basically, I find shooting relaxing. Others may find it stressful. In this case it is not the activity so much as the mother's reaction to it that will directly affect the baby).

Here is the American Pediatric Assoc take... http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/100/4/724
from 1997 - I could find no updates in the last 13 years.

My thinking is this... YOU have to decide what info you need to make a decision. You have to decide if the info you find is real info, or fear mongering, or opinion posing as info. You have to comprehend how science is "done" today, how journalists "report" it, and you need to understand statistics. Which is riskier, driving while pregnant or flying while pregnant? Drinking caffeine or taking any drug (Rx or illicit) while pregnant, or NOT taking Rx while pregnant? Shooting or not while pregnant? Gardening or not while pregnant? Eating seafood or NOT eating seafood while pregnant, Exercising or NOT exercising while pregnant? Or just laying in bed doing nothing for an entire pregnancy?
Just to use the seafood thing for example- Mercury exposure in utero is bad, but so is lack of fish oil. Can you choose the right seafood in the right amts to avoid both bad outcomes? Gardening may expose you to toxoplasmosis (just like changing the kitty's litterbox), but if your garden is the only affordable organic produce in your diet, should you chance that, or chance the pesticide exposure in store-bought fruits/veggies? Do you drink the morning cup of green tea knowing it contains caffeine in addition to its health-promoting contents? Do you practice shooting to qualify to keep your job and health insurance? Do you shoot because your environment is risky? Do you just plink for fun? Is that the only fun you have, the only stress relief you get... because maternal stress hormone levels have been demonstrated to have many negative effects on babies in utero- another statement that should be fact-checked.

Then you have to consider if you are confident enough in your own decision to base your own actions upon it. That's a kicker.

Mrs.Cicero

cpelliott
08-25-2010, 13:46
All the indoor ranges around here prohibit pregnant women on the range. I have no idea if noise, shock and lead from shooting are really an issue for pregnant women. If you live in an urban area your doctor may get a horrified look on her face if you mention guns. It is becoming common for pediatricians to interrogate children about their parents' guns.

Silent_Runner
08-26-2010, 09:21
Do not under any circumstances shoot a gun while pregnant. Its a combination of noise and the shockwave from shooting. You are also exposed to lead and other harmful contaminates in the air as well as loading ammunition. Put the guns up for a while and focus on whats important.
You can do serious damage to your unborn child!
It may be that you can only focus on one thing at a time for months on end but please stop assuming that we ladies can't do better than that. I assure you that we can.

Misty02
08-26-2010, 19:55
I will attempt to contribute with an entirely personal opinion that has absolutely no scientific backing. I wish I had been a shooter during my pregnancies, my hormones were all over the place; nearly everything I liked was evaluated for risk factors and I gave most of it up temporarily. That made my life more difficult than it should have been and I imagine intolerable for those around me. One of my sources of stress relief and fun became eating dark chocolate ice-cream; obviously, that was bad too!<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
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If that was now I would opt for ranges in the open to reduce the exposure to lead, wear long sleeves so there is less skin exposed and enjoy myself. Those around me might be thankful for it too. :supergrin:<o:p></o:p>
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Keep in mind that going outside and breathing the air (unless you live in the country) is bad too.<o:p></o:p>

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vafish
08-31-2010, 11:18
Another quote from the same article...Unfortunately, there are no definitive studies that clearly answer this question. I can cherry-pick, too.



....

Then you have to consider if you are confident enough in your own decision to base your own actions upon it. That's a kicker.

Mrs.Cicero

I wasn't cherry picking I included a pretty comprehensive snippet of the article without quoting the whole article, which would have violated Eric's rules, the last line of my quote was:

The question again, is "how relevant are the studies to our very specific question?" The answer again, is "we just don't know." Is it something we want to chance?

The question is: "Should pregnant women shoot guns?"

The answer is: We don't know, do you want to risk it?

My personal advice to women who want to take a firearms class from me is to not do it. However there may be extenuating circumstances such as female LEO's that must qualify to keep their jobs or maybe a pregnant woman who is being threatened by an abusive ex who needs to learn to defend her self with a fire arm or take a class to get her CCW permit. In those cases then you should take steps to minimize the risks as much as possible. Shoot on an outdoor range, shoot quieter guns, and limit the handling of ammunition and gun cleaning.

There are lots of things that pose a risk to unborn babies in the womb. Plenty of women still smoke when they are pregnant, plenty of women still drink alcohol when they are pregnant, the amount that they do varies as does the effects on their children.

Every woman (and I think her partner as well) should educate herself as much as possible on the various risks during pregnancy and make her lifestyle changes accordingly.

A pregnancy lasts about 9 months, that's less then 1% of the life expectancy of a woman in America.

PEC-Memphis
08-31-2010, 13:37
As I remember, Julie Golab elected to not shoot during her pregnancy, although she did dryfire practice. All things considered, she believed that it is better to error on the "safe side", than take a risk - however small. This is a risk (again - however small) that could effect your life and the life of your child for the rest of both lives.

As you know, shooting is not just a recreational sport to Mrs. Golab - it is her job.
(I guess S&W was Ok with it - as she is back shooting for the team).

Does an occasional glass of wine effect an unborn child? The risk is pretty small; however, every woman I know gave up alcohol during pregnancy. Temporarily giving up shooting is similar. It seems to be a higher risk (long term) outcome than the (short term) benefit.

emt1581
09-06-2010, 23:34
I appreciate all the replies. I think to be safe she'll steer clear of the range for a while.

Another question...did you switch guns during your pregnancy? I figured I'd get her a small .380 that is less than half the weight of her G19 just to make it a little lighter for her. I have no idea if that will make a difference, just trying to help out where I can.

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks!

-Emt1581

vafish
09-07-2010, 05:58
Here's an article about a woman worried about the noise of jack hammers effecting her baby.

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n75/vafish/Funny/jackhammernoise.jpg :rofl:

Mrs.Cicero
09-07-2010, 08:07
The difference between the two is negligible for your purpose. Weight that can be carried in one hand isn't going to matter. The problem is the bump getting in the way of carrying heavy, awkward weight that requires two hands - Hold a 30# weight with your elbows bent and the weight resting against your body, then straight arm it away from you - that's the trouble.

I carried an HK USPc thru both pregnancies, but had to switch to purse-carry after the belt wouldn't fit. It's the same gun I carried for 10 years.

Mrs.C

emt1581
09-07-2010, 09:21
The difference between the two is negligible for your purpose. Weight that can be carried in one hand isn't going to matter. The problem is the bump getting in the way of carrying heavy, awkward weight that requires two hands - Hold a 30# weight with your elbows bent and the weight resting against your body, then straight arm it away from you - that's the trouble.

I carried an HK USPc thru both pregnancies, but had to switch to purse-carry after the belt wouldn't fit. It's the same gun I carried for 10 years.

Mrs.C

That's what she does now. She has a Coronado.

Thanks!

-Emt1581

Yellowfin
09-14-2010, 11:43
What you need to mitigate the problem of shooting while pregnant is very simple: a good suppressor. The shockwave is almost totally gone and the noise significantly reduced. Only catch is you need to get the forms in ASAP because the process takes a while to get one b/c of the NFA regulation of them.

Yellowfin
09-14-2010, 11:44
Here's an article about a woman worried about the noise of jack hammers effecting her baby.

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n75/vafish/Funny/jackhammernoise.jpg :rofl:I suppose the cigarette doesn't concern her very much... :upeyes:

emt1581
09-14-2010, 13:22
What you need to mitigate the problem of shooting while pregnant is very simple: a good suppressor. The shockwave is almost totally gone and the noise significantly reduced. Only catch is you need to get the forms in ASAP because the process takes a while to get one b/c of the NFA regulation of them.

Oh I've got a bunch of suppressed guns. Only problem is they are all .22lr. Good thinking though to eliminate the noise factor.

Thanks!:)

-Emt1581

JeepnGrl99
09-21-2010, 04:05
I'm 15.5 weeks pregnant and were wondering the same thing. I've just gotten my CPL, so I'm starting to carry it. Haven't needed to use it yet thankfully. Haven't gone to the range since I found out I was pregnant either. I figure if anything this'll get me used to carrying concealed. But now I'm wondering, should I even carry at all? Is just having a gun ON me going to harm the little one?

Lone_Wolfe
09-21-2010, 07:13
I couldn't imagine a gun on you doing anything to hurt your unborn baby unless it was to go off somehow. I would clean it before carrying it, but you probably do that anyway.

Hauptmann6
09-21-2010, 13:27
Oh I've got a bunch of suppressed guns. Only problem is they are all .22lr. Good thinking though to eliminate the noise factor.

Thanks!:)

-Emt1581

I would worry about the lead and smoke as much as the noise. I've shot in places that didn't have the best ventilation for a half hour and was blowing black stuff out my nose for 2 days. That CAN'T be good for you. Even with really good ventilation you are still breathing some of it.

bfg1971
09-21-2010, 16:18
My wife came to pick me up at the range I was working at and the noise really irritated my unborn daughter. She kicked and punched like mad while there. My wife didn't come back until after she was born. As far as we can tell there was no harmful effect from the shots.

I would still carry concealed if I had done so prior to getting pregnant. Dry fire practice as much as you want. Live fire how much does it irritate your child. I would suggest outdoor ranges or ranges that have above average ventilation.

DrBob
09-21-2010, 17:08
I would advise a pregnant patient that the lead exposure and the sound wave exposure could cause serious harm to the fetus. Ask yourself it is worth it to you and your child...

Roering
09-22-2010, 18:02
I figure this would be better to ask here than at the OB/GYN.

Really????

emt1581
09-22-2010, 19:18
Really????

We'll find out.

-Emt1581

crsuribe
10-15-2010, 15:51
Pregnant women can't even take x-rays.

Misty02
10-15-2010, 17:12
Pregnant women can't even take x-rays.

You’re right, not unless they’ve had some medical training.

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