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dansjeep2000
08-28-2010, 08:35
First I would like to say THANK YOU for this fourm!

I am not only new to 10mm but new to reloading. The purchase of my G20 has made me realize reloading is the only way I can afford to shoot it.

What do you suggest for components to start out with? I am looking for both plinking and SD rounds. I just don't want to start out with a pile of the wrong stuff since I'm on a tight budget.

So far my research has pointed me to Starline brass for sure. Powder and bullet choice is alot harder with sooooo many variations out there.

Hogpauls
08-28-2010, 12:46
1st off welcome. :wavey: Like you I'm somewhat new to reloading and just came back to having a mighty 10 gun, the 20SF. Also like you I'm on a very strict budget so every buck has to count.

For reloading I use Starline brass, CCI primers, Berry's bullets and Unique for powder. Although Unique might not be the best for 10mm performance it does fine for plinking, and I use it for my .45 and .40 as well. For the nuclear backwoods round the 10 gets the Starline, Double Tap WFNGC 200 grn, CCI 350's and 800X.

I don't use the 20SF for HD duty, that gets relegated to the G30. But I have the Win Silvertips 175 grn. and Hornady 180 grn XTPs and they both perform pretty well.

_The_Shadow
08-28-2010, 15:14
Dansjeep2000, welcome to GlockTalk! I have been loading for the 10mm since the 1990's, I have used many pounds of Blue Dot for the 10mm with very accurate performance. It also allowed me to load 9mm, 38Spl, 357mag, 44 Spl & Mag, 40S&W, 357Sig, 9x25Dillon, 12ga, some 30-30Win...so with this spectrum it has been a mainstay for me.

Most of the mid range and slower pistol powders like the load to be fairly full to provide the best burn characterisics/performance. Another benifit to the fuller case of powder is usually if for some reason a double drop of powder is done it will overflow and more than likely be seen.

Other powders I work with & work well for the 10mm are...Alliant Power Pistol(great in the G-29) Accurate Arms AA#7 & AA#9. But there are many powders which will work.

As far as brass I have used everything from the range pick ups but the NEW brass has been Winchester and StarLine.

I like CCI and Winchester Primers but will use others too...
Best regards!

dansjeep2000
08-29-2010, 13:57
Well I went to the gun store yesterday and bought a Lee 4 hole turret press kit including a Lee Saftey powder scale, Auto powder, Chamfer tool, case trimmer, and primer pocket tool. I also bought a Lee Auto Prime, RCBS loading Block, 1K CCI 350's, 1# Blue Dot, 1# 800x, 100pcs Hornady 180gr XTP's. I had to order my brass, dies, and 155gr Hornady XTP's from Midway. That should be here Wednesday.

I am very excited about getting started!!

MinervaDoe
08-29-2010, 17:27
Welcome.

Which reloading manual did you get?

dansjeep2000
08-29-2010, 20:48
Welcome.

Which reloading manual did you get?


I got 2 1st is Modern Reloading 2nd edition by Richard Lee
2nd is kinda cheap looking book plastic binding, but very informative called One Book/One Caliber, It has nothing but info on .40 and 10mm. I sepnt a good part of today just reading the Modern Reloading book. Seems very informative.

MinervaDoe
08-29-2010, 20:53
One Book / One Caliber is actually a very helpful guide.

I think you will also want to get a good dial caliper so that you can check your cartridge overall length and outer diameter against your reloading manuals.

Taterhead
08-29-2010, 23:47
Well I went to the gun store yesterday and bought a Lee 4 hole turret press kit including a Lee Saftey powder scale, Auto powder, Chamfer tool, case trimmer, and primer pocket tool. I also bought a Lee Auto Prime, RCBS loading Block, 1K CCI 350's, 1# Blue Dot, 1# 800x, 100pcs Hornady 180gr XTP's. I had to order my brass, dies, and 155gr Hornady XTP's from Midway. That should be here Wednesday.

I am very excited about getting started!!

Welcome. You have components that will get you going just fine. I've used a number of pounds of Blue Dot and a decent amount of 800X. They both work well for many bullet weights with my preference being BD. You may find both to be less than suitable for SD applications due to high muzzle flash (particularly BD). The 180 XTPs are fine projectiles - especially for the price. They are very versatile and accurate.

I get better results from BD with the 180 XTPs than I do with 800X. CCI 350s have not worked well for me with 800X. Lots of pressure symptoms early. In fact, I prefer to run with standard primers for both of these powders - especially 800X.

For SD projectiles in 165 grains and higher, I prefer Accurate #9. It is clean, meters tremendously well, has minimal muzzle flash, and has attained better velocities than other powders I've tested. Accuracy is well within my abilities too. I also like Accurate #7 for mid-weight bullets for warm loads. Same metering and cleanliness as A9, but more efficient in terms of powder consumption. 800X is my least favorite powder. It has not performed as well in my testing as other powders, and it is a total pain to work with. But, it will do fine with the what you have. Hand weigh every charge please.

A word of caution: 800X and 180 XTPs have given me the single biggest "YIKES" to date. I experienced bad excess pressure symptoms at charge levels way below published maxes. I wouldn't push any loads since you are just getting going.

Have fun, work up slowly, and read your loading manuals about a thousand times.

Kegs
08-30-2010, 07:16
If economy is your main thing, start here:

1. Lone wolf aftermarket barrel, stock length.

LW are the cheapest decent aftermarket barrels out there. You need an aftermarket barrel with a tighter chamber (one that doesn't allow the brass to stretch like the Glock barrel does) so you can RE-load. You could shoot hand loaded rounds in your Glock barrel, but you may not be able to RE-load the brass you shoot out of it because that brass will be stretched out badly (so it becomes weakened). Weakened brass is a safety issue. Using brass only one time is an economic one. You can reload the brass in a 10mm many times if you use an aftermarket barrel. This saves you money in the long run.

2. Buy your brass in bulk. Google "top brass" - made by Scharch (this is quality brass and sometimes they have good prices - generally 500 or 1000 pcs.

3. Buy your bullets in bulk and pick a bullet that is cheap and fun to shoot. Sierra 190s would be a good choice - as would Nosler 135s. Check around on the internet using a search choosing reputable dealers (ask us if you question a dealer).

4. Choose a powder that goes a long way for the velocity you get. Decide on a bullet first, then look at the reloading charts and find a powder that propels the bullet to the velocity you want with the least amount of grains of powder necessary - your powder will go further, and since much of it is about the same price per pound, why not save some bucks via economy? Buy powder locally if you can and avoid the extra shipping time and $.

5. Remington large pistol primers are often cheaper and they work fine. Keep with name brand components and price shop and you'll do well.

6. For reloading components, just buy what you need - not one of those "kits" that are overpriced because you are buying a bunch of junk you don't need. A 3 die lee kit (comes with shell holder), a hand press, a powder scale (RCBS 5-0-5), a caliper (micrometer showing .0001" would be better actually for some applications). I like to hand seat my primers, so I have one of those tools. Look through the midway catalog and see what you can find in terms of equipment - you will save money if you only buy the stuff you need - no need to have a shell trimmer for 10 mil, etc.

That pretty much is all I have time for now.

Welcome to the club, keep it safe and have fun!

dansjeep2000
08-30-2010, 07:59
One Book / One Caliber is actually a very helpful guide.

I think you will also want to get a good dial caliper so that you can check your cartridge overall length and outer diameter against your reloading manuals.
I already own a nice Starrett caliper so I am covered there.

dansjeep2000
08-30-2010, 08:02
Welcome. You have components that will get you going just fine. I've used a number of pounds of Blue Dot and a decent amount of 800X. They both work well for many bullet weights with my preference being BD. You may find both to be less than suitable for SD applications due to high muzzle flash (particularly BD). The 180 XTPs are fine projectiles - especially for the price. They are very versatile and accurate.

I get better results from BD with the 180 XTPs than I do with 800X. CCI 350s have not worked well for me with 800X. Lots of pressure symptoms early. In fact, I prefer to run with standard primers for both of these powders - especially 800X.

For SD projectiles in 165 grains and higher, I prefer Accurate #9. It is clean, meters tremendously well, has minimal muzzle flash, and has attained better velocities than other powders I've tested. Accuracy is well within my abilities too. I also like Accurate #7 for mid-weight bullets for warm loads. Same metering and cleanliness as A9, but more efficient in terms of powder consumption. 800X is my least favorite powder. It has not performed as well in my testing as other powders, and it is a total pain to work with. But, it will do fine with the what you have. Hand weigh every charge please.

A word of caution: 800X and 180 XTPs have given me the single biggest "YIKES" to date. I experienced bad excess pressure symptoms at charge levels way below published maxes. I wouldn't push any loads since you are just getting going.

Have fun, work up slowly, and read your loading manuals about a thousand times.
Thanks for the warnings about 800x and XTP's, I plan to start at the bottom in 5 shot groups and work my way up. I will also make sure to measure every charge.

Kegs
08-30-2010, 15:35
I have shot 200gr. xtps with 800x and CCI 350 primers to 9.6 grains of powder which averages 1261 fps @ 15' out of my G29 and 4.45" barrel. I never saw a single sign of overpressure at all, but once I got up to around the 9 grain level, the 21# spring was outmatched by the recoil, but I think every single round shot through this gun of mine would outmatch this wimpy spring. That's why I'm ordering a 23 pounder this week. :-)

dansjeep2000
08-30-2010, 16:19
yea, I am looking at stiffer springs for mine as well.

_The_Shadow
08-30-2010, 17:39
I already have the 23lb spring from Wolff for my G-29, nice to have but quite frankly it is very stout...Too stout IMHO. Be careful!

I only use it for certain testing, other than that I use the 21lb.

dansjeep2000
08-30-2010, 21:15
What is the stock spring in a G20? 17#'s?