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sawgrass
09-14-2010, 13:20
I'm kicking around the idea of developing a class for women.
There has to be women who wonder about doing mechanical
things they haven't done. I'm thinking along the lines of piping,
changing oil, using a drill press, changing an outlet, changing a light
switch, maybe a little welding and torch use. I might add backing a
trailer, and having a general contractor as well as a true trades union
representative come in. There are so many ways to make a nice
living that I think women are afraid of, because they haven't been
exposed to it. Would you like to know how to change out a toilet,
or repair a leaking drain, repair a faucet?

What do you think? What would you like to know how to do?
Do you tend to think that evening hours or day hours would
be better? Weekdays or Saturdays?? I'm thinking around two
weeks long.

So how about a little feedback before I take my idea to the powers
that be.

Thanks,
sawgrass

ExxoticOne
09-14-2010, 16:22
Double post.

ExxoticOne
09-14-2010, 16:24
While I don't personally have any interest in doing that stuff I think a general awareness of "how stuff works" would be useful so that as a consumer the ladies won't be taken advantage of. I would also suggest a course on how to actually use some tools. You might be surprised how many women don't know how to use a drill or power saw.

sawgrass
09-14-2010, 16:35
Thanks ExxoticOne, it will be "hands on", taught in a lab environment.
I believe more women would enter the trades if they had an accurate
perception of what to expect. At the least they will leave this class
with a few helpful skills.

MrsKitty
09-14-2010, 16:38
Hang wallpaper, patch drywall, lay ceramic tile/linoleum/carpet, change a tire, prep/pour/dress concrete, repair a few loose shingles, hang windows/doors, replace cabinets and countertops...

I don't know when would be better. Some schedules favor weekends while other people are busier on the weekend than during the week. That will be a toss up.

sawgrass
09-14-2010, 16:45
Thanks Mrs.Kitty,
I appreciate the feedback. This is step one in the process.
Determining need and desire.

Mrs. Tink
09-14-2010, 17:48
Try a Level I and Level II class. If I were a total newbie and saw that a class would be teaching me how to replace a toilet, I would find it sufficiently daunting and would stay away. However, if "Level I" covered things like how to operate a drill, how to replace a taillight, how to repair a broken rod in your window frame... and "Level II" covered replacing a toilet, using a soldering iron, electrical work, etc. then that might be better.

Can you offer two classes, say one on weekday nights and one on weekends?

WWJGD
09-14-2010, 18:41
I think it's a great idea, sawgrass. As a single homeowner, I often attempt DIY repairs. Sometimes they go well. :supergrin: I'd love to know more about some basic mechanical and electrical things. Aside from my own home and car repairs, I wouldn't mind having skills for extra jobs during the summer.

Anyway, I'd sign up, and I know many of my gal friends would as well. Go for it, and keep us posted! :wavey:

sawgrass
09-14-2010, 21:21
Thanks everyone!

As I mentioned this is in the early planning stages.
I appreciate the replies. I think there might be two
markets. One for female homeowners and another
for an introduction to a career in a skilled trade.

Zonny
09-14-2010, 21:42
I'd go for that. I just asked GT how to access my brake light compartment. :wavey:

And, I'm proud to say...ta da...I did it!!! :courtsie:

sawgrass
09-14-2010, 22:09
I'd go for that. I just asked GT how to access my brake light compartment. :wavey:

And, I'm proud to say...ta da...I did it!!! :courtsie:

Zonny by the time I saw that thread, you had it fixed!
Congratulations!

The other female involved in this idea teaches auto mechanics and
used to be a trainer for Ford. She is AMAZING!

Zonny
09-14-2010, 22:42
Well...I think it's fixed. I tried to get one of the dogs to sit on the brake peddle so I could check it. They weren't going for it. :rofl:

sawgrass
09-14-2010, 23:19
You might be surprised how many women don't know how to use a drill or power saw.

No, not a bit. That's what I would like to help change. It isn't as hard as
many women perceive it to be. What I actually find is that young men these
days haven't been exposed to a lot of tools either. They spend their breaks
playing games on their phones.

Well...I think it's fixed. I tried to get one of the dogs to sit on the brake peddle so I could check it. They weren't going for it. :rofl:

I find that my 8 pound schnoodle isn't very helpful either. Sometimes cute
is enough!

ExxoticOne
09-15-2010, 06:15
No, not a bit. That's what I would like to help change. It isn't as hard a many women perceive it to be. What I actually find is that young men these days haven't been exposed to a lot of tools either. They spend their breaks playing games on their phones.

We have a thread in the GNG section about the essentials of a good first aid kit. Some type of "essentials" unit on a home tool box may be useful. I have all DeWalt stuff and I know how to use it all...even though I have no desire to create, build or repair anything.

Out of sheer impatience one weekend, I did install 3 ceiling fans. It was more out of my desire to finish decorating than anything else. I am very proud of that little feat. I will show you pics later.

sawgrass
09-15-2010, 08:55
We have a thread in the GNG section about the essentials of a good first aid kit. Some type of "essentials" unit on a home tool box may be useful. I have all DeWalt stuff and I know how to use it all...even though I have no desire to create, build or repair anything.

Out of sheer impatience one weekend, I did install 3 ceiling fans. It was more out of my desire to finish decorating than anything else. I am very proud of that little feat. I will show you pics later.


That's a good idea. Having the right tool makes all of difference in the world.
I have DeWalt tools as well. I really like them. I'm still using the original
18volt batteries after several years.

EO you are indeed a mystery...:cool: That's impressive. Friends and neighbors are always asking me to install or repair things. I'm getting better at saying
"no, sorry I don't do side work". I gave one of my pals a whole house humidifier for her bday. I do need to get myself over there before Winter
and install it. She catches a lot of colds, I'm hoping it will help.
I go as far as to carry a small bottle of saline and keep my nasal membranes
moist, mostly at work where there is very poor humidification. I rarely catch
a cold. Hey...I could add a little IAQ! (indoor air quality)

vafish
09-15-2010, 12:41
Not a lady,

But my dad is a retired shop teacher. He teaches adult education classes in home repair.

He has a series of classes that cover plumbing, electrical, wall board and roofing. He gets a lot of women taking his classes that own their own homes and want to be able to do simple repairs.

LilWolfess
09-15-2010, 14:29
My boss and I were discussing this topic a while ago...

I'd figure that most women should AT LEAST see how it is done. (Heck, even some men I know should take a class on these things). If I were in the area, I'd show up even though I do have some experience in these areas.

Lone_Wolfe
09-15-2010, 14:49
I have to go get on a plane and don't have time to give a good answer, but I think it's a great idea. I'll go more into what I'm thinking later if you like. :wavey:

sawgrass
09-15-2010, 21:53
My boss and I were discussing this topic a while ago...

I'd figure that most women should AT LEAST see how it is done. (Heck, even some men I know should take a class on these things). If I were in the area, I'd show up even though I do have some experience in these areas.

That would be fun!

I have to go get on a plane and don't have time to give a good answer, but I think it's a great idea. I'll go more into what I'm thinking later if you like. :wavey:

Of course I want to know what YOU think...silly.

BobbyT
09-15-2010, 22:48
I'd suggest maybe going a step back from the hardcore stuff (drill press, welding) and more toward the practical, home improvement type stuff.

I'm not sure what age you're targeting, but very few girls in my generation (early/mid 20s) have any interest in changing their own oil. Few of my guy friends do. You don't just notice one day you happen to need something welded.

But stuff like rewiring electrical outlets, replacing car fuses or bulbs, topping off fluids, finding a stud to hang a shelf...that's the type of general maintenance stuff that a very non-hands-on 23 year old girl (or 33, or 53) could pick up pretty quickly, and is likely to put to use.

sawgrass
09-15-2010, 23:17
I'd suggest maybe going a step back from the hardcore stuff (drill press, welding) and more toward the practical, home improvement type stuff.

I'm not sure what age you're targeting, but very few girls in my generation (early/mid 20s) have any interest in changing their own oil. Few of my guy friends do. You don't just notice one day you happen to need something welded.

But stuff like rewiring electrical outlets, replacing car fuses or bulbs, topping off fluids, finding a stud to hang a shelf...that's the type of general maintenance stuff that a very non-hands-on 23 year old girl (or 33, or 53) could pick up pretty quickly, and is likely to put to use.

Thanks for the suggestions. I don't know where this is going either, but these
replies are helping me see that there is likely two distinct markets. One the
general homeowner folks, the other the skilled trades career minded group.

ExxoticOne
09-16-2010, 10:55
But stuff like rewiring electrical outlets, replacing car fuses or bulbs, topping off fluids, finding a stud to hang a shelf...that's the type of general maintenance stuff that a very non-hands-on 23 year old girl (or 33, or 53) could pick up pretty quickly, and is likely to put to use.

I agree. Things like learning how to use a measuring tape (find studs) and a level to properly hang picures, how to install closet organizers, change a toilet seat, navigate around an electric panel, basic plumbing for toilet and washing machine common problems, changing plumbing fixtures like hardware and shower heads, how to hang ceiling fans and wall sconces, fix screens, etc.

After that you can work on larger projects like setting plumbing fixtures, cutting and laying tile or pavers, installing cabinets, etc.

Mrs.Cicero
09-16-2010, 12:11
I've done a bunch of minor house stuff - changing out the toilet, laying vinyl tile, installing elec outlets, installing faucets, etc. But I can't do squat with my current vehicle - nothing I learned on the '79 Mailbu I drove in HS applies to an '03 Caravan. I blew a fuse on the van a couple weeks ago and the radio/CD player/clock won't work now. My husband says it's an easy fix, but he doesn't have time to do it... I'm about to get annoyed enough to attempt it myself. Thank goodness for the internet...

I'd love to learn how to cut ceramic tile, how to weld (the growing steampunk motif around here is going to demand that, soon), and how to do minor work on my van. In about 5 years, I'm going to buy a car for my girls to restore - I figure that should give them a decent knowledge base, and me, too, in the process.

One of my three favorite classes in college was woodshop... but in one semester, you don't get to cabinetry, which I'd like to learn, too, cause the ones in this house need to go in the worst way...

I wish you lived closer, Sawgrass.


Mrs.Cicero

BobbyT
09-16-2010, 13:57
A car fuse is a 30 second fix...if you're looking in the right place.

Most cars have a main fuse box under the hood, generally with a 6-8" by 3-4" plastic cover, usually with a bunch of squares showing the proper fuse to use (5/10/25 amp).

A lot also have an additional smaller box either under the dash, or down by your feet. There are generally slots for spare fuses so you won't need anything--but replace the spares so next time they'll be there!

You can get a box of assorted fuses at AutoZone, Wal-Mart's automotive section etc, and often they include a nifty little grabber tool. If it has an LED on it, even better. The top of a blade fuse has 2 little openings

The little testers which are often built into fuse grabbers have prongs you can touch to the openings, and the LED will light up if the fuse works. This way if you don't know which specific fuse it is, you don't have to pull a dozen of them to see which is blown.

Mrs.Cicero
09-16-2010, 15:10
A car fuse is a 30 second fix...if you're looking in the right place.

Most cars have a main fuse box under the hood, generally with a 6-8" by 3-4" plastic cover, usually with a bunch of squares showing the proper fuse to use (5/10/25 amp).

A lot also have an additional smaller box either under the dash, or down by your feet. There are generally slots for spare fuses so you won't need anything--but replace the spares so next time they'll be there!

You can get a box of assorted fuses at AutoZone, Wal-Mart's automotive section etc, and often they include a nifty little grabber tool. If it has an LED on it, even better. The top of a blade fuse has 2 little openings

The little testers which are often built into fuse grabbers have prongs you can touch to the openings, and the LED will light up if the fuse works. This way if you don't know which specific fuse it is, you don't have to pull a dozen of them to see which is blown.

Thanks Bobby - as soon as the thunder stops here, I'm going out to find and fix this!

Mrs.C

sawgrass
09-16-2010, 15:30
Mrs.C.
I wished I lived closer too. I would happily teach you to weld if you took
me deer hunting!

If you need any more help with van send me make and model.
I can pull an electrical schematic and take a look.

For that matter automotive electrical (all of it, old and new) is
Wrencher's specialty! :)

SG

soldier615
09-16-2010, 21:04
Try a Level I and Level II class. If I were a total newbie and saw that a class would be teaching me how to replace a toilet, I would find it sufficiently daunting and would stay away. However, if "Level I" covered things like how to operate a drill, how to replace a taillight, how to repair a broken rod in your window frame... and "Level II" covered replacing a toilet, using a soldering iron, electrical work, etc. then that might be better.

Can you offer two classes, say one on weekday nights and one on weekends?

Mrs Soldier here. I agree with Mrs Tink. Too much info too fast would be overwhelming and may intimidate many women. I know I would be intimidated enough not to attend. But if you split it up into levels, that would work, IMO.

Also, depends on what you would be charging for this and where it would be held. My hubby can do most of these things and does so, but he is not a very patient teacher when it comes to me learning from him.

PATRICE
09-26-2010, 16:11
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