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XDRoX
10-09-2010, 19:07
I just got my birthday present in the mail. A full 223 conversion for the 550b with Dillon dies.

I'm interested in how you guys load 223 on a 550b.
I don't really see a point to use the sizing die because I figure the brass will be completely prepped before I load it on the 550b.

These were my thoughts.

Resize on a single stage.
Trim, deburr, and clean the primers pockets.
Tumble to get the lube off.
Take the prepped brass to the 550b to prime, powder drop, seat, and crimp.

So I figured I'd have stage one empty on the 550b.

Is this how you guys are loading 223 on a 550b?

n2extrm
10-09-2010, 19:17
XD,

If I am loading for the AR I do the first reloading by full sizing the brass, trimming to minimum, swage the primer pocket and any other primer pocket prep. Then I run it through like any pistol round.

I don't load over the top and found I can get a few loadings after the first trimming before I need to worry again. So I lube a few and resize and check the length, if the first few are good I lube the rest and just run them through like pistol rounds.

If they are close to too long or too long, size them trim them and run them through the press.

I use the Dillon case lube and just wipe them off quick as I do the final inspection and put them in boxes. I do use a case gauge in the final inspection.

GioaJack
10-09-2010, 19:22
Unless you're trying to develop bench loads there is no reason to trim or clean primer pockets every loading.

Start with a quantity of known brass, (the above steps) then use all of your stages in the 550. If you use a spray lube such as the Hornady you don't even need to worry about removing the lube.

Every three loading or so check a sample of your brass for length, etc,, just keep loading them until you get inconsistencies then trim, clean pockets or cull.

No sense having a progressive if you're not going to use it as a progressive.

Remember, this stuff isn't complicated, it's as simple as 2+2=5... or what ever the hell it is nowadays.


Jack

XDRoX
10-09-2010, 19:33
Thanks guys.
Currently I have a lot of brass that is already prepped. Would you just leave the sizing die out to to finish loading these?

I just don't want to have to lube if I don't need to. I order One Shot but I won't have it until next week.

XDRoX
10-09-2010, 19:38
Also, you don't expand the mouth on these right?
Is setting up the powder die tricky?

GioaJack
10-09-2010, 19:42
The sizing die has an expander button, it stretches the case neck just enough to apply the proper bullet tension.

If you use a lube in the case neck, (I use a dry mica but I would imagine the One Shot would work just as well), you'll reduce the drag on the brass and minimize stretching.

BTW... what's a 550B... isn't that one of Dillon's smaller, slower presses? :whistling:


Jack

n2extrm
10-09-2010, 19:46
The rifle die has an expander ball built into the decaping pin. You do not bell the case like a pistol round. You will find that boat tail bullets will make your life so much easier. If you have the die out you can leave it out, no reason to size them a secon time. Even if you did not fire the brass you still are working it every time it enters the die to some degree.

Powder is an issue not the adjustment. I use Varget and while it shoots well it meters questionably. Use the larger (rifle) bar. First set the powder die so a case fully operates the measure, but is not crushing the case or stressing the measure. I watched my friend snap a measure we think it was to tight an adjustment. Once you have that right weigh some charges. They are going to varry about .2 grains or so and that is the best you will get with a stick powder like varget.

n2extrm
10-09-2010, 19:50
Xd I appoligize I have obviously been talking to jack too long and I am repeating his answers.

At least it show I paid attention to him.


Jack I am glad to see you posting away!

XDRoX
10-09-2010, 20:02
The rifle die has an expander ball built into the decaping pin. You do not bell the case like a pistol round. You will find that boat tail bullets will make your life so much easier. If you have the die out you can leave it out, no reason to size them a secon time. Even if you did not fire the brass you still are working it every time it enters the die to some degree.

Powder is an issue not the adjustment. I use Varget and while it shoots well it meters questionably. Use the larger (rifle) bar. First set the powder die so a case fully operates the measure, but is not crushing the case or stressing the measure. I watched my friend snap a measure we think it was to tight an adjustment. Once you have that right weigh some charges. They are going to varry about .2 grains or so and that is the best you will get with a stick powder like varget.

Ya, I'm a little worried about knowing how to set the powder die when I'm not going to see the expansion. I'm using W748 so it should meter well. The stuff is like sand.

I'll read the instructions when I get home, hope it's not too hard.

n2extrm
10-09-2010, 20:15
I put the die in with the measure attached loosley to the die with no powder in it. Put a case in station two and raise the ram. Screw the die in and watch the powder bar. All it has to do is reach a full swing. Lock it all down. This is why you need consistent case lenghths to get a good charge. If you get a short case you will not get a full dump. There is a little room for error, just not alot. Once you see it in operation you will see how simple it is.

freakshow10mm
10-09-2010, 20:31
Is this how you guys are loading 223 on a 550b?
Lube
Size, prime
Charge with powder
Seat
Crimp
Tumble lube off

No need to trim or clean pockets unless you make your living shooting.

I put the die in with the measure attached loosley to the die with no powder in it. Put a case in station two and raise the ram. Screw the die in and watch the powder bar. All it has to do is reach a full swing. Lock it all down.
This is how I do it.

XDRoX
10-09-2010, 20:36
Interesting.
I'm all for skipping trimming if it means faster plinking rounds.
What are the I'll effects of not trimming besides inconsistent powder throws?

freakshow10mm
10-09-2010, 20:42
Placement of case mouth to cannelure.

Some things reloading manuals think are the gospel but seldom mean anything. Primer pocket cleaning is one of them. Trimming brass is the other.

XDRoX
10-09-2010, 21:01
Placement of case mouth to cannelure.

Some things reloading manuals think are the gospel but seldom mean anything. Primer pocket cleaning is one of them. Trimming brass is the other.

What if I load the cases over and over again? Won't they eventually be so long they'll cause feeding or jamming issues?

I hate trimming, so if I can skip it that'll be awesome.

freakshow10mm
10-09-2010, 21:09
.223 only grows so much, then stops. I've gotten a dozen or so loads out of a batch of brass that "needed" trimming.

.223 is the .45 of rifle brass.

EL_NinO619
10-09-2010, 21:15
I will stick to trimming, i have seen first hand the growth of rifle brass. Brass is like a child there grown up before you know it. I hate trimming but i i would hate stuck cases and feeding issues even more, And even a possible KB do to the brass pincing the lands and building pressure in a jiffy. Well at least that is what i have heard. You can skip trimming XD, But i will not shoot them, and will make sure i pick a lane a little further away..

sig2009
10-09-2010, 21:18
Buy the RCBS X-Dies and you only have to trim once. The best investment I ever made!

shotgunred
10-09-2010, 22:59
XD,

If I am loading for the AR I do the first reloading by full sizing the brass, trimming to minimum, swage the primer pocket and any other primer pocket prep. Then I run it through like any pistol round.

I don't load over the top and found I can get a few loadings after the first trimming before I need to worry again. So I lube a few and resize and check the length, if the first few are good I lube the rest and just run them through like pistol rounds.

If they are close to too long or too long, size them trim them and run them through the press.

I use the Dillon case lube and just wipe them off quick as I do the final inspection and put them in boxes. I do use a case gauge in the final inspection.

This is how I do it as well. But then again I learned how to do it here.:supergrin:

dudel
10-10-2010, 05:09
If you're tumbling to remove the lube, you could end up with media in the flashhole. In the case of rifle dies (to avoid having to retrim), I'd consider a universal decapper in the first station to make sure the flash hole is clear. I guess that's why I just wipe/tumble the lubed cases in a towel with mineral spirits.

fredj338
10-10-2010, 10:56
I put the die in with the measure attached loosley to the die with no powder in it. Put a case in station two and raise the ram. Screw the die in and watch the powder bar. All it has to do is reach a full swing. Lock it all down. This is why you need consistent case lenghths to get a good charge. If you get a short case you will not get a full dump. There is a little room for error, just not alot. Once you see it in operation you will see how simple it is.
Correct, this is how I load my 308. If you want to skip some steps, get the RCBS X die, trim your cases & then size in stn1 w/ the X & you should never have to size trim again. For blasting ammo, I don't worry much about cleaning primer pockets, so there isn't really anything left to do for case prep. I use HOS for case lube. Pretty straight forward.