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CourtCop
10-17-2010, 10:03
My wife just bought me a Remington 870 Synthetic and as I am new to shotguns I would like to know how all of you keep yours loaded for that "bump in the night" scenario.

Should it be:
A)chamber loaded, magazine loaded, safety on
B)chamber loaded, magazine loaded, safety off
C)chamber empty, magazine loaded, safety on
D)chamber empty, magazine loaded, safety off

I am leaning toward "C"

I should mention I will also be using a trigger lock until I can pick up a better means of securing it from my two little girls. The Mossberg Lock Box, ShotLock and TufLoc are all possibilities. Anybody have a preference there?

Thanks in advance guys.

Havasu
10-17-2010, 10:10
I'm a "D". Living alone matters.

KK40384
10-17-2010, 10:25
D as long as you don't have kids snooping around that could get a hold of it.

bklynpete
10-17-2010, 11:07
OK, I've never owned a HD shotgun, actually the only one I have is a Stoeger that I used for Cowboy action shooting. I would think choice A, but I see alot of keeping the chamber empty on posts. Why? I wouldn't think of keeping my HD weapon with an empty chamber. Just want to know the reasoning behind this. I of course don't have kids in my home.

Pete

aippi
10-17-2010, 11:07
D - I kept weapons this way for my entire adult life. I never used a trigger locking device as we kept the Master bedroom door locked and had a lock on the bedroom closet. These were quality dead bolt locks. Our children were not allowed in our bedroom and the door was locked when we were not present as was the closet. Both of us carried and my duty weapon was hanging on a peg in a duty belt in the closet. Of course when home at night the doors were unlocked as a weapon is of no use if it can not be deployed when needed.

Everyones situation is different and some laws require those devices in some states. Having a stay at home mom helped later as the kids got older. We had no concerns about ours but as they got older they had other kids in the housing visting and that was a concern. You have to do what is right for your situation.

spyder1969
10-17-2010, 11:54
C- That is how I roll, but I train that way, so I can do it while sleep walking.

Havasu
10-17-2010, 12:02
OK, I've never owned a HD shotgun, actually the only one I have is a Stoeger that I used for Cowboy action shooting. I would think choice A, but I see alot of keeping the chamber empty on posts. Why? I wouldn't think of keeping my HD weapon with an empty chamber. Just want to know the reasoning behind this. I of course don't have kids in my home.

Pete
I do it partly for safety, but I also want anyone snooping around my home in the middle of the night to hear the shotgun rack. I suspect I will be home alone right after that happens.

mixflip
10-17-2010, 12:09
D. I keep it that way in my safe because I have kids. But if I lived alone or with no kids it would be that way in my closet if I didnt own a safe yet.

Z71bill
10-17-2010, 14:01
First I make sure chamber is empty on my Remington 870

Then I load up the magazine

Take safety off - and pull the trigger (dry fire)

Store it in my bedroom safe which gets unlocked before bed - but is locked all day.

This way if I need the gun - all I need to do is pump the action - since I dry fired the gun - I do not need to mess with finding / pushing the action button or turn safety off.

I do not have small kids - daughter is 21 - but IMHO it is a bad idea to leave a loaded shotgun in the closet WHEN YOU ARE NOT HOME.

I know if I store a loaded gun in the closet before bed I would forget to put it back in the safe.

No way I want to come home and get shot with my own gun - keeping it is the safe at least gives me some margin of safety.

Glockdude1
10-17-2010, 14:05
D.

:thumbsup:

Eyescream
10-17-2010, 14:16
I use the first option.

Hedo1
10-17-2010, 15:01
D is the way I keep mine. I download 1 in the magazine and have a side saddle so I can choose the first round if necessary. (Buck or slug).

KalashniKEV
10-17-2010, 15:12
A and tell the kids not to touch it.

Esp if you're going to use the trigger lock.

southernshooter
10-17-2010, 17:46
First I make sure chamber is empty on my Remington 870

Then I load up the magazine

Take safety off - and pull the trigger (dry fire)

Store it in my bedroom safe which gets unlocked before bed - but is locked all day.

This way if I need the gun - all I need to do is pump the action - since I dry fired the gun - I do not need to mess with finding / pushing the action button or turn safety off.

I do not have small kids - daughter is 21 - but IMHO it is a bad idea to leave a loaded shotgun in the closet WHEN YOU ARE NOT HOME.

I know if I store a loaded gun in the closet before bed I would forget to put it back in the safe.

No way I want to come home and get shot with my own gun - keeping it is the safe at least gives me some margin of safety.

Thats what I do too. May be considered over concern about the hammer spring but I keep all of my guns that I can hammer down.

JK-linux
10-17-2010, 17:53
First I make sure chamber is empty on my Remington 870

Then I load up the magazine

Take safety off - and pull the trigger (dry fire)

Store it in my bedroom safe which gets unlocked before bed - but is locked all day.

This way if I need the gun - all I need to do is pump the action - since I dry fired the gun - I do not need to mess with finding / pushing the action button or turn safety off.

I do not have small kids - daughter is 21 - but IMHO it is a bad idea to leave a loaded shotgun in the closet WHEN YOU ARE NOT HOME.

I know if I store a loaded gun in the closet before bed I would forget to put it back in the safe.

No way I want to come home and get shot with my own gun - keeping it is the safe at least gives me some margin of safety.

Same here. No kids so I'm good with this set up.

Jon_R
10-17-2010, 18:35
My primary defensive tool is my handgun but I keep a shotgun in the keypad safe in close to C from the options.

I keep one shotgun chamber empty, hammer cocked, magazine tube full minus one shell, on safe. I like hammer cocked so I know the bolt won't move around with out deliberate action. The mag tube down by one allows me to pump in a slug easily if I need to and may be easier on the spring but that is often debated. The shotgun has a 6 shot side saddle with 2 slugs and 4 00Buck. Giving me a total of 9 00 buck and 2 slugs as my grab if time allows weapon. If I am awake I have a Pistol on or next to me. At night that one is laying on the floor next to the bed with another in a push button lock box in the bedroom.

If a hurricane is bearing down possibly leading to social order issues I might ready more stuff or locate it differently but in my area I don't think it will be an issue.

swinokur
10-17-2010, 18:40
D.

It is also called "cruiser ready" as cops call it. In the middle of the night and half asleep you do not want to fool with a safety or worse forget it's on.
The simpler the manual of arms the better

my .02

dc2integra
10-17-2010, 19:10
I use option A

sambeaux2249
10-17-2010, 22:11
My wife just bought me a Remington 870 Synthetic and as I am new to shotguns I would like to know how all of you keep yours loaded for that "bump in the night" scenario.

Should it be:
A)chamber loaded, magazine loaded, safety on
B)chamber loaded, magazine loaded, safety off
C)chamber empty, magazine loaded, safety on
D)chamber empty, magazine loaded, safety off

I am leaning toward "C"

I should mention I will also be using a trigger lock until I can pick up a better means of securing it from my two little girls. The Mossberg Lock Box, ShotLock and TufLoc are all possibilities. Anybody have a preference there?

Thanks in advance guys.

All my "defense" shotguns are stored in condition D. Two of them are in Mossberg Loc Boxes, which requires having the action open. I highly recommend the loc box. It's one of the cheapest, is very secure, and reasonably fast to open. There are some caveats, however. You cannot have a sidesaddle on your gun if you're using a loc box. In many cases, you can't even have a butt cuff on the shotgun ( if you have a baseboard ).

Sam

El_Ron1
10-18-2010, 01:41
It's a D thang. Know your respective gun's controls by feel and touch in the dark. Otherwise, you might find yourself pressing the safety on instead of off.

Slayer
10-18-2010, 05:35
I am in Condition 1 always. Locked and Loaded at all times.

Aceman
10-18-2010, 06:43
C

Is it me or have there been no "b" takers yet....

Jon_R
10-18-2010, 06:55
C

Is it me or have there been no "b" takers yet....

I would not do B myself. I only would have a handgun loaded manual safeties off if it was contained in a good holster protecting the trigger. On all my shotguns taking it off of safe is trivial and I do it all the time in training classes and matches. It would worse for me to not have it on safe as I would be wondering why the safety is stuck not letting me move it.

alexanderg23
10-18-2010, 07:08
C......

whenmonkeysfly
10-18-2010, 08:12
A. Me and the wife, NO KIDS, have four very large dogs and live out in the country.

MrMurphy
10-18-2010, 08:58
When i had a shotgun, D. My rifles stay in this state generally too (depending on the rifle of course) but a pistol is my "need it right NOW" weapon, if I have a few seconds for the long gun, i have time to chamber.

bklynpete
10-18-2010, 10:32
When i had a shotgun, D. My rifles stay in this state generally too (depending on the rifle of course) but a pistol is my "need it right NOW" weapon, if I have a few seconds for the long gun, i have time to chamber.


I still don't understand this reasoning. A handgun is less cumbersome, so it would be faster to rack it's slide. If you are surprised with a shotgun, why spend the extra time with racking it? You want to scare the intruder with the sound of racking a slide?? I guess that would work if you are fortunate enough to hear the intruder before hand, but if he bursts into your bedroom, then what? It doesn't make sense with a handgun and shouldn't with a shotgun either. As far as keeping the safety off, then I guess not many people have 1911's by their bedsides cock and locked. Everyone should know and practice with the weapon used for HD, so there shouldn't be any surprises with the manual of arms. When I was in Nam, my weapon was locked and loaded at all times. It just makes more sense to me to have all weapons chambered at all times with the safety on if it has one, whether it's a handgun or long gun.

David Armstrong
10-18-2010, 11:57
First I make sure chamber is empty on my Remington 870
Then I load up the magazine
Take safety off - and pull the trigger (dry fire)
Same here. That is the cruiser ready status used by me over 20 years in LE, and what I'm most used to. Nothing to really think about, just pump it and be ready to go.

F_G
10-18-2010, 11:58
C, but that's the way I train and am intimately familiar with my shotgun.

Jeff82
10-18-2010, 12:24
A and tell the kids not to touch it.

Esp if you're going to use the trigger lock.

Never use a trigger lock on a fully loaded weapon, especially a rifle or shotgun.

solocanoe
10-18-2010, 13:04
Same here. That is the cruiser ready status used by me over 20 years in LE, and what I'm most used to. Nothing to really think about, just pump it and be ready to go.

me too. handguns are different - fully C1 with no safeties - but this makes best sense for us for our SD 870.

Z71bill
10-18-2010, 17:21
If I have a round chambered in a stored SD/HD gun - then it is IN A HOLSTER.

Since I don't have a holster for my 870 :upeyes:I do not keep a round chambered.

My SD/HD hand guns are the same - I have a few pistols in my safe - full mag - empty chamber - NOT in a holster.

I have 3 guns I carry (one at a time) - when not being carried they are in a safe - all with a full mag - one in the chamber - but they stay in their holsters.

This keeps it simple & consistent - which - no matter how you decide to keep your guns is a good idea.

MrMurphy
10-18-2010, 23:06
The pistol is loaded and chambered in a holster, 24/7/365, it's a carry gun.

Rifle is chamber empty full mag because that is the way "I" trained with it during my time in, heading into a situation, chamber a round. We were not in a warzone in a hot situation. I don't need to keep an M4 locked and loaded constantly, i have a pistol within arms reach. If I have time to retrieve the rifle, i have time to chamber and don't care who hears it.

WoodenPlank
10-19-2010, 03:20
My 590 is stored in a locked safe in my bedroom closet, with a full magazine, empty chamber, and safety off. Grab it, pump it, and engage the threat.

jp 19
10-20-2010, 21:45
First I make sure chamber is empty on my Remington 870

Then I load up the magazine

Take safety off - and pull the trigger (dry fire)

.

may i suggest doing your dry fire before you load the tube. Please.

jp 19
10-20-2010, 21:51
It's a D thang. Know your respective gun's controls by feel and touch in the dark. Otherwise, you might find yourself pressing the safety on instead of off.

huh??? pressing the safety on.... what?! that just doesnt make sense unless
you never handled the shotgun before the incident...

captdreifus
10-21-2010, 01:35
E. Chamber empty, magazine loaded, safety off, hammer down.

turbodieseli4i6
10-21-2010, 06:01
I pick D;
Mine is two feet from me by my night stand, with 10 rounds of centurian muti-defence buckshot and 10 rounds of 00 Buck in the drum.

B Coyote
10-21-2010, 08:37
My 870 is kept full magazine, empty chamber, safety on. I do not dry fire before storage.

bc

Z71bill
10-21-2010, 13:57
may i suggest doing your dry fire before you load the tube. Please.


:dunno:

Not a big difference either way -

If a person is careless enough to load the mag - pump one into the chamber and then pull the trigger

They are careless enough to

Dry fire and empty gun - load the mag - pump one into the chamber and pull the trigger.

I can't say your way is bad or wrong - next time around I may give it a try -

IIRC I will need to keep the action manually closed - don't think I can load the mag tube if the action is open - even a little bit.

Reminds me of this -

Two of the loudest sounds you will ever hear --

The sound of a shot being fired when you knew the gun was unloaded before you pull the trigger

and

The click sound an empty gun makes when you pull the trigger - of a gun you are using to defend your life.

Thankfully I have never head either sound.

tx787
10-21-2010, 14:45
D, cruiser ready.

CTfam
10-21-2010, 17:58
B)chamber loaded, magazine loaded, safety off

B. Pointed at the door. With fishing line going from the trigger to the door knob. :supergrin:


Really though, D. I used to keep it cocked and locked but I handled it too much and it made me uncomfortable.

mattyd123
10-21-2010, 20:27
C. Lots of time behind that little remington safety. I'm the lightest sleeper on the planet, sleep with my bedroom door locked, and have 3-4 dogs in the house at all times. I'm assuming I'd have enough time to make ready with the 870 sitting against my headboard. If that doesn't work I'll have to resort to the g19

Eyescream
10-21-2010, 21:44
D)chamber empty, magazine loaded, safety off

Those of y'all that keep the gun in condition Ddo you keep the action open, too?

El_Ron1
10-21-2010, 23:47
That'd be looney.

Big Time
10-21-2010, 23:57
D, Just the wife and I these days

Eyescream
10-22-2010, 08:00
That'd be looney.

I thought so too, but I was curious canuse I have to hit the release to get the slide to actuate if a round's not been fired. Same difference to me as hitting the safety.

Z71bill
10-22-2010, 08:14
I thought so too, but I was curious canuse I have to hit the release to get the slide to actuate if a round's not been fired. Same difference to me as hitting the safety.

That is why I take the safety off & dry fire before I store the gun - so I do not need to mess with little buttons & levers in a high stress situation.

Once the 870 has been dry fired even if you close the action it does not lock closed - so when I pick up the gun all I need to do is pump a round in.

I do store the gun with the action closed - just to keep dirt / dust out.

Eyescream
10-22-2010, 08:35
That's a good idea, I didn't think of doing that. Hm.

KalashniKEV
10-22-2010, 13:13
Never use a trigger lock on a fully loaded weapon, especially a rifle or shotgun.

I thought of that after... I've never used a trigger lock but I suppose they can be slid back if they aren't tight or the weapon type permits it.

I don't really like that option anyway...

Unistat
10-22-2010, 14:52
I thought of that after... I've never used a trigger lock but I suppose they can be slid back if they aren't tight or the weapon type permits it.

I don't really like that option anyway...

I have never seen a trigger lock tight enough that this cannot happen if one is determined enough. Trigger locks are absolute garbage imho. If I need to lock one of my firearms, I use a cable lock.

Keep my 870 in "D", btw. Just me, my wife, and our 2 month old daughter in the house. Mr. Shotgun is locked up during the day and next to the bed at night.

goldwing1555
10-22-2010, 15:20
http://www.santacruzgunlocks.com/setups/completehome.html

This is what i am using for my rem 870.

chfltft
10-22-2010, 19:25
D.
Besides, the sound of loading the shotgun, whether auto or pump, is really a deterrent in itself. I've seen it freeze even well trained professionals in place long enough for it not to matter that the weapon wasn't in condition 1.
Never use a trigger lock on a weapon with a round chambered. Too much of a chance you can cause an inadvertent discharge while removing it.

G21FAN
10-22-2010, 20:13
870 Mag loaded, chamber empty, safety off, action locked by being cocked. Slight edge of safety. Only adults in house.

Robalero
10-24-2010, 06:27
Option D

Empty nesters here, so my 1100 Tactical is loaded with one in the chamber. When I had kids in the home, not a chance at all, although my Glock was always close. However, as we get older, we become more "prey" like to the bad guys. Yeh, bad guys don't want a real fight, they want easy, prey like individuals that will not fight back. Not in my home!

unit1069
10-24-2010, 06:42
Option D

That seems the best combination for safety and readiness to me.

Mofeen
10-24-2010, 07:49
I will chime in with option B.

If there is a bump in the night, i need it ready. Don't want to be fumbling around. Just my wife and I in the house, and we are both adept at firearms.

Just always treat your firearm as loaded and keep your finger off the trigger and muzzle pointed in a safe direction until you are to blast away.

Unless there are kids in the house, I see no real good reason for any of the other options.

Eyescream
10-24-2010, 08:19
That is why I take the safety off & dry fire before I store the gun - so I do not need to mess with little buttons & levers in a high stress situation.

Once the 870 has been dry fired even if you close the action it does not lock closed - so when I pick up the gun all I need to do is pump a round in.

I do store the gun with the action closed - just to keep dirt / dust out.

Okay I did this. Way better than the retarded way I was trying to do it. :patriot:

1 old 0311
10-24-2010, 11:32
As with ALL weapons B

Z71bill
10-24-2010, 15:25
Okay I did this. Way better than the retarded way I was trying to do it. :patriot:

I wish I could give the person that told me about it the credit - it was someone on GT - So whoever you are THANKS!

I was worried I would have a hard time finding the action button on the 870 - in a SD situation - it is in a different location than the Winchester I had been shooting for 40 years - this solved my problem.

Sometimes it is the simple things - after you know about them - it is so obvious - makes me understand the old - Why didn't I think of that?

Murgatroy
10-24-2010, 15:32
Option D.

I have a small child in the house. The shotgun stays out of her reach, and she has been raised that she doesn't touch a gun without Daddy there. That is how all children should be raised, not relying on locks and hiding.

MacG22
10-24-2010, 22:33
I have a young daughter in the house. I keep it in "A". Every night it goes into my room with me, and every morning it goes into the home office with me (which is locked and my daughter does not come in). It's definitely a personal decision and contingent upon your context...what your space is like, what your kid(s) are like, etc. For me, this has worked.

#5xbr
10-25-2010, 18:18
mossberg 5500 semi-7+1 condition A.

Ljay
10-25-2010, 22:49
A for me no kids, Winchester 1300 Defender, #4 Buck, Rem 870 20Ga. Slug barrel, I dont wanna have to rack mine, It might scare the bad guy off, :whistling:

9mmtupperware
10-25-2010, 23:13
OK, I've never owned a HD shotgun, actually the only one I have is a Stoeger that I used for Cowboy action shooting. I would think choice A, but I see alot of keeping the chamber empty on posts. Why? I wouldn't think of keeping my HD weapon with an empty chamber. Just want to know the reasoning behind this. I of course don't have kids in my home.

Pete

Because the sound of a shell being racked into a shot gun will send the perps running the other way thus saving you the trouble of cleaning him off of or replacing your walls,... and all of the other other imperial entanglements that these type of events generate.

LASTRESORT20
10-25-2010, 23:18
C Foe me...

ElectricZombie
10-26-2010, 00:42
D although I've used B in the past. I became a bit paranoid about something hitting the trigger.

I generally don't use safeties. I also live alone and don't allow children in my home. My shotgun or rifle is secondary to my pistol.

G23c
10-26-2010, 05:27
C- That is how I roll, but I train that way, so I can do it while sleep walking.

"C" for me. same as spyder, although I don't roll, train or sleepwalk.

Minnow
10-26-2010, 18:31
Option D, with the hammer down.

BrianJ786
10-27-2010, 00:41
Condition A. I live alone. 7 is better than 6 :cool:

Airsprint
10-27-2010, 02:59
D, my mossberg is within arms reach from my bed I dont want to accidentaly set it off or something if I kept it in a or b, + the sound of a pump action shotty getting ready to go would scare the **** out of me If I heard it so maybe if im pumpin one into the chamber someone will think twice and they wont have to get shot.

ET.
11-02-2010, 07:46
"D" for me.

I would rather pump once and shoot. That is the action I will use after my first shot. It's kind of like pumping the football slightly before that "hell mary" pass into the end zone. I don't want to remember to find the safety and push it as I'm stumbling over my wife's shoes in the floor. One action & one action only. "Pump & shoot, pump & shoot". Plus if someone happens to pick up the shotgun first they probably will assume it's ready to fire. SO while they are figuring out why it doesn't go "boom" I get the chance to take them out. AND it is harder for a kid to kill their playmates with the chamber empty. JMHO

Glockdude1
11-02-2010, 08:32
"D" for me.

I would rather pump once and shoot. That is the action I will use after my first shot. It's kind of like pumping the football slightly before that "hell mary" pass into the end zone.

You mean a HAIL MARY pass....... :rofl:

swinokur
11-02-2010, 08:51
You mean a HAIL MARY pass....... :rofl:

Especially if you are looking down the barrel of a 12 gauge..


:wow:

mitommy
11-04-2010, 09:03
D is the way I keep mine. I download 1 in the magazine and have a side saddle so I can choose the first round if necessary. (Buck or slug).

+1

This method allow for ammo choices. This is how I was taught and I've never had a reason to change.

ramrunnr
11-06-2010, 01:01
The only problem with "A" and "B" is that most shotguns are not drop safe. I know we aren't planning to drop our shotties, but crap happens. There is a reason police departments call "D" cruiser ready. The shotguns usually don't have a firing pin block like rifles and pistols.

I have tested this with some of the shotguns I have and have access too. (pump and semi autos by Mossberg, Remington, Browning, and Maverick) Loaded a "empty" shell (no gunpowder) with a live primer and dropped the shotguns butt first onto a bath towel (keep dirt out of the recoil pads and to simulate carpet) and every shotgun tested fired the primer in the shell. Also tested a side fall, butt on ground and fall sideways onto folded towels, I got about a 60% fire rate. Of course, like anything your mileage may vary. This is just my opinion and I keep mine in "D"

#5xbr
11-07-2010, 21:27
all these drop test were with safties on/off?

JK-linux
11-07-2010, 21:28
Nothing quite as useless as an unloaded gun.

Jeff82
11-08-2010, 14:48
all these drop test were with safties on/off?

Long arm safeties such as the cross-bolt don't do anything to prevent "drop" events from causing the gun to fire. They simply stop rearward trigger movement but don't lock up sear engagement/disengagement. You need to check your specific gun to identify exactly what kind of safety you have and to see what it exactly does/doesn't do.

FireForged
11-10-2010, 19:22
- d -

den888
11-22-2010, 22:00
D, cause the racking sound will scare the crap out of any intruder that hears it.