I think I got what I paid for..... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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GlockSupremacy
10-17-2010, 20:48
So I bought a 100ft ethernet cable off ebay to run in my apartment thinking a wired connection would be faster than a wireless card.... (I paid 8 bucks instead of 50 for the cable)

Today I got a old buffalo pci wireless card from a buddy. Turns out according to speedtest.net that the wired connection is 8.XX mb/s while wireless is 11.5X mb/s. :(

Anyone else have this experience?

I am also wondering why I always have to test everything I own?

kc8ykd
10-17-2010, 21:38
have you tried another cable to try and determine if the problem is the cable or the new card?

also, you should double check your duplex/speed settings on your card to make sure they match whatever device it's connecting to.

Linux3
10-18-2010, 08:26
Really, all you are testing is the speed of your internet connection.
Roadrunner, ADSL, whatever, are usually in the 11 Mbit/sec. range and a good 802.11b will keep up.
If you have an 802.11g wireless connection, and based on the 11.5 Mb/sec. you do, that's all the speed you will get. I would guess your internet connection tops out at 11.5 Mb/sec.

As for the slower speed with a wired connection.
What kind of wire? Cat 4, cat 5 or what?
If you have too much cable did you loop it around something? That really slows down the connection speed.
How many bends do you have? Total in degrees.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable#Bending_radius

sdsnet
10-18-2010, 08:41
With the wired connection make sure that you do not have a duplex mismatch between the card and your switch/router. If both are set to auto negotiate the duplex one may have detected half duplex when the other is running full duplex which causes a reduction in performance. You can ensure this will not happen by hard coding the duplex to full on the switch/router as well as the interface installed in your pc. 100 mbit full duplex on each side will prevent a mismatch.

Another potential problem is a faulty cable. Replace it with a known good short one and move the pc closer for a quick test to determine if this is the case.

The other posters are correct, if your Internet connection is only 6 megabit and your wireless is G with 54 megabit then the bottleneck is the Internet connection and not your pc's connection. Even 802.11b wireless is good for 11 mbit/sec.

srhoades
10-18-2010, 09:38
Also make sure you have the latests drivers from the Buffalo website for the card.

kc8ykd
10-18-2010, 10:58
guys, let's remember that 802.11b is only ~5.5-5.8mb each way (minus encryption/protocol overhead).

and that 802.11g is only ~23-27mb each way (minus encryption and protocol overhead).

so, an 802.11b connection would not accommodate his (assumed) 11mb internet connection fully, but only about half.

Linux3
10-18-2010, 16:05
guys, let's remember that 802.11b is only ~5.5-5.8mb each way (minus encryption/protocol overhead).
and that 802.11g is only ~23-27mb each way (minus encryption and protocol overhead).
so, an 802.11b connection would not accommodate his (assumed) 11mb internet connection fully, but only about half.
In theory 802.11b is 11 Mb/sec but either way he said he was getting 11.5 Mb/sec so it's pretty safe to assume 802.11g which is 54 Mb/sec - distance.

Either way the issue is the problem with the cable. If he is getting 11.5 Mb/sec with wireless why even try to switch to cable. Is his internet access any faster?

You can have the world's fastest home network, I have 802.11n (sorta) but that doesn't matter for internet access. I still only get 11.5 Mb/sec from roadrunner.

kc8ykd
10-18-2010, 17:03
In theory 802.11b is 11 Mb/sec but either way he said he was getting 11.5 Mb/sec so it's pretty safe to assume 802.11g which is 54 Mb/sec - distance.

Either way the issue is the problem with the cable. If he is getting 11.5 Mb/sec with wireless why even try to switch to cable. Is his internet access any faster?

You can have the world's fastest home network, I have 802.11n (sorta) but that doesn't matter for internet access. I still only get 11.5 Mb/sec from roadrunner.

it's not theory, 11mb/s is the aggregate bandwidth for 802.11b. the upload or download speed is only 1/2 that.

the same goes for 802.11g, 54mb is the agg, ~1/2 that is the tx or rx speed.

these are easily testable, if you don't believe what i'm typing, please, test it for yourself.

it very well could be the cable due to a shoddy crimp or nicked sheathing of the individual cables. it's an easy component to rule out as being the problem as well. simply try another cable in place, or temporarily move the computer close to the switch/hub/router that will allow for the use of an existing known good cable.


i did not address whether switching to wired is a better solution to wireless for him, that's up for him to decide.

he also could have the scenario where he'd like to be able to move files between computers on his network at higher speed than his wireless setup would allow for, who knows.

Green_Manelishi
10-19-2010, 12:31
So I bought a 100ft ethernet cable off ebay to run in my apartment thinking a wired connection would be faster than a wireless card.... (I paid 8 bucks instead of 50 for the cable)

Today I got a old buffalo pci wireless card from a buddy. Turns out according to speedtest.net that the wired connection is 8.XX mb/s while wireless is 11.5X mb/s. :(

Anyone else have this experience?

I am also wondering why I always have to test everything I own?

Not all ethernet cables are created equally. Sometimes you get what you paid for; I once worked for a company that baulked when I began replacing dime-per-bag terminators and cheesy ethernet cable with top quality hardware; but he could not argue that the incidence of network problems decreased. But I have no idea if the best cable would be faster or slower than the best card.

Hauptmann6
10-19-2010, 16:15
There's a good chance that you have a 10 meg Ethernet card. With overhead and collisions, 8.something meg sounds about right. On top of a crappy cable.

GlockSupremacy
10-19-2010, 17:45
Really, all you are testing is the speed of your internet connection.
Roadrunner, ADSL, whatever, are usually in the 11 Mbit/sec. range and a good 802.11b will keep up.
If you have an 802.11g wireless connection, and based on the 11.5 Mb/sec. you do, that's all the speed you will get. I would guess your internet connection tops out at 11.5 Mb/sec.

As for the slower speed with a wired connection.
What kind of wire? Cat 4, cat 5 or what?
If you have too much cable did you loop it around something? That really slows down the connection speed.
How many bends do you have? Total in degrees.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable#Bending_radius

Thanks for the advice here guys! I feel special now that the problem is fixed...

Anyway Linux3 nailed it. The cat5e cable came in a nice 8in diameter so the extra cable I left coiled like this. I made about 3 foot loops and now I am seeing consistent 11.46mb/s.

Damn electricity for behaving like a fluid! Still don't know why i didn't think of this...Also all drivers were the most recent.

Turns out my china cable can hold its own this time!