How precise should the powder throw be? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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wrx04
10-23-2010, 18:51
I just sat down to load a small batch of test bullets for the range tomorrow, and i was planning on loading 5.9gr of unique for 230FMJ. I set up the dispenser, and the first couple measurements came out at 5.9, 6.0, 5.7, 5.9, 6.1....basically there was a .2gr error range. Is this normal?

I decided to back down a little just in case, and my random test measurements were between 5.6 and 5.9. Should be OK, right?

Secondly, is there any trick to get the spent primers to land IN the catch tray? I swear half of them go flying onto the floor.

Finally, I had TWO rounds out of 50 that didnt fit in the case gauge.....they stick out [I]slightly[I] They were the first two rounds i made tonight. OAL is normal (1.25) and i ran them through the seating and crimping dies twice, but still no-go. The only thing i know could have caused this was there was a spent primer UNDER the shell plate (another that missed the damn bin), but that shouldn't have anything to do with the seating/crimp, but maybe they didnt get resized since the primer blocked the shellplate from reaching the full downward position?:dunno:


And no.....i don't have an ex-wife that can test fire those two F'ed up rounds:supergrin:

bob98247
10-23-2010, 19:03
On small charges you are going to have some variation.

Sometimes the cases have a burr on the rim that keeps them from dropping into the case gauge. I have found that if I put the round in the gauge rim first and give a twist it knocks down the burr. I have also had a few cases that seem to have been a little off center when resizing like the burr held the base of the case offset to the press a few thousanths and these take a file to the rim to get them to drop in the gauge.
Just something to think on

Bob

ron59
10-23-2010, 19:06
Those that stick out *slightly* will still fire fine in your gun.

When I am creating ammo for competition, however, those would get "weeded" out, I would use them for practice only. Only rounds that easily slide into and out of the gauge are ones that I will use for competition.

WiskyT
10-23-2010, 19:19
I think your powder throws are a bit too far off. What measure and scale are you using?

BC Dan
10-23-2010, 19:26
I quit using Unique in my progressive because of the same issue. I found Win231 works a lot better at throwing consistant weight charges.

GioaJack
10-23-2010, 19:30
How in the world do you expect to become an experienced loader with no ex-wives to test fire your work up loads? What do you want to do, kill yourself? Fine, have it your way.

Now, to your question about the powder variance. As much as it pains me, I have to disagree with Wisky on this one and we all know how I almost always agree with him.

It is not unusual, nor detrimental to have a .02 grain variance when throwing Unique as long as you're not loading max or over max loads. (You shouldn't be anyway... especially over published max loads on a progressive.)

If you have a powder baffle make sure it's installed. When you add powder to the hopper tap the side a few times to make sure it's settled and throw several charges before you actually start to load.

Do all that and you'll be fine. Short of clamping the gun in a Ransom Rest you'll never see or be able to tell the difference.

Now get to work on that ex-wife thing... or do you always want to be a rookie?


Jack

wrx04
10-23-2010, 19:31
Bob and Ron, thanks for the advice. I will see if there is a burr.

Nemesis Lead
10-23-2010, 19:34
How in the world do you expect to become an experienced loader with no ex-wives to test fire your work up loads? What do you want to do, kill yourself? Fine, have it your way.

Now, to your question about the powder variance. As much as it pains me, I have to disagree with Wisky on this one and we all know how I almost always agree with him.

It is not unusual, nor detrimental to have a .02 grain variance when throwing Unique as long as you're not loading max or over max loads. (You shouldn't be anyway... especially over published max loads on a progressive.)

If you have a powder baffle make sure it's installed. When you add powder to the hopper tap the side a few times to make sure it's settled and throw several charges before you actually start to load.

Do all that and you'll be fine. Short of clamping the gun in a Ransom Rest you'll never see or be able to tell the difference.

Now get to work on that ex-wife thing... or do you always want to be a rookie?


Jack

Yeah--I agree. Unique does not meter as well. .2 grains is about the most variance you should accept, however. Beyond this, you have a problem. Make sure you run a powder checker.

I usually get .1 grains of variance with Unique but do get the occasional .2 grain variance.

wrx04
10-23-2010, 19:34
I think your powder throws are a bit too far off. What measure and scale are you using?

This was the next "variable" i was unsure of, and may actually be the problem. I am using the digital scale that came with the "best" reloading package from brian enos. I put the charge on the scale and it reads 5.6....wait for it....then jumps to 5.8 a couple seconds later. Hmmmm....:whistling:

wrx04
10-23-2010, 19:41
How in the world do you expect to become an experienced loader with no ex-wives to test fire your work up loads? What do you want to do, kill yourself? Fine, have it your way.

Now, to your question about the powder variance. As much as it pains me, I have to disagree with Wisky on this one and we all know how I almost always agree with him.

It is not unusual, nor detrimental to have a .02 grain variance when throwing Unique as long as you're not loading max or over max loads. (You shouldn't be anyway... especially over published max loads on a progressive.)

If you have a powder baffle make sure it's installed. When you add powder to the hopper tap the side a few times to make sure it's settled and throw several charges before you actually start to load.

Do all that and you'll be fine. Short of clamping the gun in a Ransom Rest you'll never see or be able to tell the difference.

Now get to work on that ex-wife thing... or do you always want to be a rookie?


Jack

Cool. Thanks for the reply. I'm staying pretty low in the load range, so i should be OK. I was gonna jump up to 6.0 grains for this batch, but since there is a .2 variance and the max published load is 6.6, i think i'll stay with my pansy 5.6-5.8 range until i get a better feel for this stuff.

I'm working on the rookie thing. I'm probably gonna be popping the question on the FIRST future ex-wife in a few months here. I've got a long way to go to catch up to your old ***.:rofl:

WiskyT
10-23-2010, 19:41
This was the next "variable" i was unsure of, and may actually be the problem. I am using the digital scale that came with the "best" reloading package from brian enos. I put the charge on the scale and it reads 5.6....wait for it....then jumps to 5.8 a couple seconds later. Hmmmm....:whistling:

Jack is right in the sense that as long as you are far enough away from max, the variation shouldn't cause any problems. But, you are looking at an extreme spread of 0.4 grains, which is a bit much IMO. I do not like digital raloading scales, I don't rust them. Good digital scales can cost $2,000.00. I just don't trust a $75.00 digital scale, certainly not more than a $75.00 beam balance.

wrx04
10-23-2010, 19:42
Yeah--I agree. Unique does not meter as well. .2 grains is about the most variance you should accept, however. Beyond this, you have a problem. Make sure you run a powder checker.

I usually get .1 grains of variance with Unique but do get the occasional .2 grain variance.

Thank you, sir.:wavey:

WiskyT
10-23-2010, 19:43
Oh, and I have no problem staying within +/- 0.1 grain with Unique and the Lee disc measure checked with a beam balance.

wrx04
10-23-2010, 19:45
Jack is right in the sense that as long as you are far enough away from max, the variation shouldn't cause any problems. But, you are looking at an extreme spread of 0.4 grains, which is a bit much IMO. I do not like digital raloading scales, I don't rust them. Good digital scales can cost $2,000.00. I just don't trust a $75.00 digital scale, certainly not more than a $75.00 beam balance.

That was my thinking as well.....a beam is pretty cut and dry. The one that i got was an "upgrade" probably just to take more of my money. The thing LOOKS cheap....kinda like one of those scientific calculators you can buy for five bucks. Maybe i should just buy a beam scale.

PastorDan
10-23-2010, 20:17
**Disclaimer - Everything writen is by a rookie***
I have had the same variation when loading Unique (I will probably change powders when this pound is used up) but I was at the range today and there is no way to tell if one was off a little bit and nothing blew up.
I did the digital scale thing but I can't say that I like the variance of .2 grains that is seems to have even when calibrated everytime I turn it on. I still use it though to get the powder thrower close and then the beam to hone it in. I would not use it only and never with my rifle rounds but I am working in some of the higher load range with them.

IndyGunFreak
10-23-2010, 20:27
I do not like digital raloading scales, I don't rust them. Good digital scales can cost $2,000.00. I just don't trust a $75.00 digital scale, certainly not more than a $75.00 beam balance.

Totally agree.

When everyone started raving about that scale over on Brianenos.com, I had serious misgivings... I'm sure it's a nice scale, but I have two issues. 1. I generally dislike electronic scales and 2. I will not use an electronic scale that does not have an external power supply. Batteries can be weak, dirty contacts, etc.. all can cause fluctuations, etc.. just don't like it at all.

Personally, I'd have nuked the Electronic scale he sells, and replaced it w/ the $59 Dillon Beam scale... but that's neither here nor there now.

As others have said.. My experience w/ Unique has been less than positive on my LCT. It just didn't meter all that well.. 231 meters almost flawlessly.

PCJim
10-23-2010, 21:12
For test rounds, you should be trickle charging those cases. At least that's what I do. There is NO variance in my charges, which is what you should be seeking for establishing the test levels. You can still use the progressive for sizing, priming and final bullet seating. This is especially easy to do on the 550b.

Once you've determined the preferred charge, then set your powder dispenser.

wrx04
10-23-2010, 21:16
For test rounds, you should be trickle charging those cases. At least that's what I do. There is NO variance in my charges, which is what you should be seeking for establishing the test levels. You can still use the progressive for sizing, priming and final bullet seating. This is especially easy to do on the 550b.

Once you've determined the preferred charge, then set your powder dispenser.

Thats the problem....even if i do trickle the charges and know exactly what i want, the powder measure has a variance of +/- (.2).

PCJim
10-23-2010, 21:27
If you are trickle charging into the pan on a beam scale, you will not have a variance. I've tried an electric scale, albeit a cheap one, and will stay with the 5-0-5. Call me old school...

Sonnytoo
10-23-2010, 21:30
I quit using Unique in my progressive because of the same issue. I found Win231 works a lot better at throwing consistant weight charges.

It will make a big difference what powder you're using. IIRC, ball powders run better from a powder-drop than flake powder.
I'm using Win 231 also, along with Bullseye, and have no trouble maintaining about 5 or 6 grains with 0.1grain variation in either direction. I wouldn't be happy with +/- 0.2 grains with these small loads.
For that matter, even when I'm loading up to 20+ grains for my big long colt revolver loads with H110, I still get within +/- 0.1 grains.
I'm using a Dillon 550B loader with Dillon powder measure that I've had for 20 yrs or so.
Sonnytoo

ilgunguygt
10-24-2010, 00:45
Thats not bad, its about like using 700x through a measure, it just doesnt work great. I have found that with unique and 700x the .2gr variation usually doesnt affect accuracy. In fact, with 700x and autoloaders I have found that any charge that is below max and cycles the slide is usually accurate. Unique I just load working my to max until I dont have as much dirt in the gun when I am done. Its usually pretty damned close to max before it cleans up. I dont like it for those reasons, mainly its metering. Anymore I use AA#2 in target loads, because it meters so darn good.

fredj338
10-24-2010, 01:14
I can get consistant 0.1gr throws w/ my Dillon measure & Unique. Make sure the return rod is snug, use the same pressure when pushing the handle. You can take the hopper off & polish the interior w/ some 600g paper, helps some. If you are off the max, it won't matter much. As for the dig scale, IMO, you can't get a good one for less than $100, at least I haven't seen one yet. The Dillon Term is a great scale, better than the cheaper one Brian is selling. It doesn't wonder, always zeros & is always accurate withing 0.1gr.

ki4dmh
10-24-2010, 02:44
I quit using Unique in my progressive because of the same issue. I found Win231 works a lot better at throwing consistant weight charges.
I LOVE 231!! I have never had a metering issue with it. It seems like 99% of the other powders very by a 1/10 or so every time. I have never had that issue with 231. Tite Group meters almost as well for me.
Scott

dudel
10-24-2010, 03:20
Oh, and I have no problem staying within +/- 0.1 grain with Unique and the Lee disc measure checked with a beam balance.

Same here with a Dillon powder measure. Unique works fine there.

IndyGunFreak
10-24-2010, 04:37
Same here with a Dillon powder measure. Unique works fine there.

I'll leave open the fact it might have been a user malfunction, as Unique was the first powder I tried a few years ago. It didn't work well for me in the Auto Disk. Ultimately, thats why I switched to 231, and it's been quite good for me.

Dillon really needs to rework the primer catcher on the 550... it's actually one of the things turning me off from that machine. There's some fixes/hints over on BrianEnos.com in the 550 forum though....

IGF

gforester
10-24-2010, 08:42
I used to get varying readings with my Dillon powder throws when using a Hornady electronic scale. It would only measure to the nearest .2 grains. That just isn't accurate enough for my tastes. If you are between say .2 and .4 it would flit back and forth. Essentially you could only be within a .2 grain range with it.

I then purchased a PACT elecronic scale that runs off 110V instead of a battery. It measures to the nearest .1 grain. I seldom if ever get a varying reading now. I've also found that you have to have a VERY SOLID table top and no fans blowing across the bench to insure consistent readings.

tac_driver
10-24-2010, 09:23
I just sat down to load a small batch of test bullets for the range tomorrow, and i was planning on loading 5.9gr of unique for 230FMJ. I set up the dispenser, and the first couple measurements came out at 5.9, 6.0, 5.7, 5.9, 6.1....basically there was a .2gr error range. Is this normal?

I decided to back down a little just in case, and my random test measurements were between 5.6 and 5.9. Should be OK, right?

Secondly, is there any trick to get the spent primers to land IN the catch tray? I swear half of them go flying onto the floor.

Finally, I had TWO rounds out of 50 that didnt fit in the case gauge.....they stick out [I]slightly[I] They were the first two rounds i made tonight. OAL is normal (1.25) and i ran them through the seating and crimping dies twice, but still no-go. The only thing i know could have caused this was there was a spent primer UNDER the shell plate (another that missed the damn bin), but that shouldn't have anything to do with the seating/crimp, but maybe they didnt get resized since the primer blocked the shellplate from reaching the full downward position?:dunno:


And no.....i don't have an ex-wife that can test fire those two F'ed up rounds:supergrin:
1. As from Brian Enos site you throw 5 charges or more to allow the powder to settle.
2. You should be taking an average of 5 throws in your case for 5.9 5 throws should come out to 5x5.9 = 29.5grs. Everytime you adjust the powder measure throw 5 charges to let the new change settle then throw another 5 charges to measure for a total of ten charges everytime you make an adjustment.
3. I didn't like the way Unique metered in my 550B so i installed a baffle from UniqueTek (http://www.uniquetek.com/site/696296/product/T1278)

I put a piece of duct tape on my primer catch cup to deflect the spent primers into the cup. I also removed the cotter pin for the swinging ramp and put in a piece of paper clip. I also polished the sides of the ramp with my Dremel tool.

You can use your barrel's chamber to check the rounds they should drop in and fall out with no resistance.

Happy reloading and stay safe.

chris in va
10-24-2010, 09:29
FWIW, I just flat don't like Unique...and I use dippers. It's just difficult to use. Bullseye is like dust and sticks to everything.

My favorite so far is Universal. It has the consistency of sand and is very workable.

PCJim
10-24-2010, 11:54
If you are trickle charging into the pan on a beam scale, you will not have a variance. I've tried an electric scale, albeit a cheap one, and will stay with the 5-0-5. Call me old school...

I suppose I should have been a bit more specific. I manually trickle charge all my test rounds using a much older, metal version of this:

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=317787

dudel
10-24-2010, 12:02
I suppose I should have been a bit more specific. I manually trickle charge all my test rounds using a much older, metal version of this:

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=317787


That't the one I use to trickle powder. 20 years old, and still works great. I dump a charge half grain short of what I want into the case, dump the powder from the case to the pan, then twist the green knob until the beam scale centers on my target weight. Return powder to the case with a funnel and continue on. Charge weight is spot on every time.

I used to start with an empty pan, but the trickler feeds powder almost a granule at a time. Even with light loads it took a lot of twisting to get the charge up.

Another use I found for the trickler is to trickle shot when building up 38 Spl shotshells. I trickle #9 shot into the scale to get the shot charge just right. Works great.

PCJim
10-24-2010, 12:15
Dudel, we use the exact same procedure. I use a Lee dipper to get close, then finish off with the trickler.

I had to read your post twice, as it gives a bit of confusion when speaking of powder charges measured in grains: I used to start with an empty pan, but the trickler feeds powder almost a grain [granule of powder] at a time.

dudel
10-24-2010, 12:39
Dudel, we use the exact same procedure. I use a Lee dipper to get close, then finish off with the trickler.

I had to read your post twice, as it gives a bit of confusion when speaking of powder charges measured in grains:

Good point. I fixed it. Grain being a unit of weight and also a description of a flake of powder! English can be a nasty language. :embarassed:

Boxerglocker
10-24-2010, 13:34
Secondly, is there any trick to get the spent primers to land IN the catch tray? I swear half of them go flying onto the floor.



Dillon really needs to rework the primer catcher on the 550... it's actually one of the things turning me off from that machine. There's some fixes/hints over on BrianEnos.com in the 550 forum though....

IGF



I put a piece of duct tape on my primer catch cup to deflect the spent primers into the cup. .

This is the common band aid fix for most that have problems with the primer catch bin. I've read alot about it and found the concensus that most primer feed problem with a Dillon on any of the machines including the used primer catch cup can be attributed to the stability of the press mounting itself, a strong mount helps which I know the OP has. But if I were him I would seriously consider bracketing the bench he has to the floor or bolt the back to stud in the wall with a lagbolt. My 650 is mounted on a 2 inch maple butcher block top of my snap on tool box. The unit weighs upwards of 2500 pounds, solid as a rock with zero flex. Knowing the above stated, the only time used primers miss the cup is when I neglect to push the bin completely within the bracket rails.

WiskyT
10-24-2010, 13:55
This is the common band aid fix for most that have problems with the primer catch bin. I've read alot about it and found the concensus that most primer feed problem with a Dillon on any of the machines including the used primer catch cup can be attributed to the stability of the press mounting itself, a strong mount helps which I know the OP has. But if I were him I would seriously consider bracketing the bench he has to the floor or bolt the back to stud in the wall with a lagbolt. My 650 is mounted on a 2 inch maple butcher block top of my snap on tool box. The unit weighs upwards of 2500 pounds, solid as a rock with zero flex. Knowing the above stated, the only time used primers miss the cup is when I neglect to push the bin completely within the bracket rails.

If you want a quick and effective way to secure a bench, sheetrock screws work just as well as lag bolts. Drill pilot holes and shoot them into the wall studs through the bench lumber. Also, you can shoot them diagonally through the legs and into the floor if you have a plywood/OSB floor. That's waht I did, right through the carpet, padding etc. It drew the bench tight against the floor compressing the carpet. You'll never find the holes in the pile if you take the screws out, but the pile may never bounce back if the bench is left there for any period of time. Anyway, sheetrock screws work real well and they are a lot cheaper than lag botls. Most of us have sheetrock screws around anyway, but they need to be 3" long.

Boxerglocker
10-25-2010, 17:58
I don't rust them. Good digital scales can cost $2,000.00. I just don't trust a $75.00 digital scale, certainly not more than a $75.00 beam balance.

Totally agree.

When everyone started raving about that scale over on Brianenos.com, I had serious misgivings... I'm sure it's a nice scale, but I have two issues. 1. I generally dislike electronic scales and 2. I will not use an electronic scale that does not have an external power supply. Batteries can be weak, dirty contacts, etc.. all can cause fluctuations, etc.. just don't like it at all.

Personally, I'd have nuked the Electronic scale he sells, and replaced it w/ the $59 Dillon Beam scale... but that's neither here nor there now.



I personally like the convenience of a digital scale, use the Dillon one. I've had it tested by a friend at our precision tool calibration lab at work. It's on par in regards to all commerical aerospace requirements, so I'm happy with it.
I have a used Dillon beam that I picked up for a back-up at $35....
regardless of what scale you use, IMHO either is useless unless you have a set of these:
http://media.midwayusa.com/ProductImages/Large/493216.jpg

WiskyT
10-25-2010, 18:18
I personally like the convenience of a digital scale, use the Dillon one. I've had it tested by a friend at our precision tool calibration lab at work. It's on par in regards to all commerical aerospace requirements, so I'm happy with it.
I have a used Dillon beam that I picked up for a back-up at $35....
regardless of what scale you use, IMHO either is useless unless you have a set of these:
http://media.midwayusa.com/ProductImages/Large/493216.jpg

My issue with digital scales isn't the accuracy, I think any of the name brand scales are accurate and that can be verified with the check weights. My issue is how do you know it's working right? So you check it with check weights, and adjust your measure with several throws and everything comes up 5.0 grains. I think that's reliable. An hour later you verify everything is still at 5.0 and I think it's safe to say that you are truly throwing 5.0 grains. It would take a series of unlikely events, like your measure wandering, and your scale being inaccuratethe same amount and direction as your measure wandering, etc so the digital is good to go for that kind of use.

Where I don't trust them is for wighing individual charges like trickling. Your scale could be "accurate" and checked with weights, but it could have a momentary glitch while you are trickling and how would you know. It could stick etc and how would you know? With a beam, you can see it work. You can physically see it settle out.

Maybe this isn't a good analogy, but it's what comes to my mind. My work truck has a Diesel engine that is totally controlled by computers. There are random pauses in power, under acceleration. The pauses last a fraction of a second. There is some ghost in the machine that makes it stumble.

Anyway, maybe the scenarios I wory about are very unlikely. Maybe there are things that can go wrong with a mechanical scale that I haven't considered. My opinion isn't based on any type of professional experience or academic training, just my gut opinion.

texas 48
10-26-2010, 21:56
I used to get varying readings with my Dillon powder throws when using a Hornady electronic scale. It would only measure to the nearest .2 grains. That just isn't accurate enough for my tastes. If you are between say .2 and .4 it would flit back and forth. Essentially you could only be within a .2 grain range with it.

I then purchased a PACT elecronic scale that runs off 110V instead of a battery. It measures to the nearest .1 grain. I seldom if ever get a varying reading now. I've also found that you have to have a VERY SOLID table top and no fans blowing across the bench to insure consistent readings.

I find my PACT powder dispenser and electronic scale to be very accurate. 90 drops out of 100 are exact on to programed weight 9 are within .1gr usually light side rarely more that .2 off. Double check against a beam scale and RCBS digital 1st 10 drops and the PACT is right on.

ron59
10-28-2010, 05:35
Wrx04 - you mentioned that when you put the charge on to weight it, it would read one value, then change.

Where are you reloading? Is there a fan nearby or maybe a heating or A/C vent? I ask, because that is indicate of an air current. The instructions explicitly state that you must be away from air currents, these babies are THAT sensitive. That's not just THIS digital measure, but all (I think?).

I reload in the garage, and I've had the same thing happen with me with nothing but the garage door open. I couldn't even *feel* a breeze, but what you described happened to me. I closed the door (got hot, but oh well), and that situation stopped. Don't blame the scale if you're not using it properly.

wrx04
10-28-2010, 09:26
Wrx04 - you mentioned that when you put the charge on to weight it, it would read one value, then change.

Where are you reloading? Is there a fan nearby or maybe a heating or A/C vent? I ask, because that is indicate of an air current. The instructions explicitly state that you must be away from air currents, these babies are THAT sensitive. That's not just THIS digital measure, but all (I think?).

I reload in the garage, and I've had the same thing happen with me with nothing but the garage door open. I couldn't even *feel* a breeze, but what you described happened to me. I closed the door (got hot, but oh well), and that situation stopped. Don't blame the scale if you're not using it properly.

I'm pretty sure it wasnt air current, but there is a window in the room that i *may* have had open....dont really remember. I am aware of how sensitive these things are. I used some VERY sensitive high $$ scales in chemistry labs during undergrad.

ron59
10-28-2010, 09:47
I'm pretty sure it wasnt air current, but there is a window in the room that i *may* have had open....dont really remember. I am aware of how sensitive these things are. I used some VERY sensitive high $$ scales in chemistry labs during undergrad.

It doesn't even take much of a "detectable" air current. As I mentioned, it was only a few weeks ago that I was working up a load for some moly bullets. It was Saturday afternoon, garage door was up so wife could go in/out as was working outside.

I noticed my scale reading was wandering as you described. I lowered the door... it immediately stopped and did not occur again.

I've used that scale off/on for 6 months now (working up a few loads with different powders/bullets). It has been very accurate and dependable when used properly. Note, with my 550B, once I have my powder measure set where I want, I don't even bother to verify my throws anymore... the thing is dead nuts accurate. I just throw 5-10 loads (putting thrown powder back into hopper) at beginning of session and then go to work.

ursoboostd
10-31-2010, 09:29
I have the digital scale from Brian's site and I don't trust it at all. I've ran tests with it against my Dillon beam scale and they don't agree at all. Just the mear fact that the digital scale will go up and down .2gr before it finally settles at a measurement greatly concerned me in the 1st place. I can take the same exact item and weigh it back to back on that dig. scale and it will read different. Usually within .2gr -Wade-

WiskyT
10-31-2010, 12:18
I have the digital scale from Brian's site and I don't trust it at all. I've ran tests with it against my Dillon beam scale and they don't agree at all. Just the mear fact that the digital scale will go up and down .2gr before it finally settles at a measurement greatly concerned me in the 1st place. I can take the same exact item and weigh it back to back on that dig. scale and it will read different. Usually within .2gr -Wade-

I think there are people who realize this, and the rest who blame "that dang unique". "It won't meter I tell ya!":upeyes:

Sonnytoo
10-31-2010, 14:12
On my Dillon 550B, I throw 20 or 30 charges, then dump them back into the top. Then I weigh a few, and adjust slightly as necessary. Then, when I start putting powder into the cases, it's throwing the charge within +/- 0.1 grain, and averages even closer than that. My Dillon has been doing this for 30 yrs or so.
Sonnytoo

Bello
10-31-2010, 14:41
I have the digital scale from Brian's site and I don't trust it at all. I've ran tests with it against my Dillon beam scale and they don't agree at all. Just the mear fact that the digital scale will go up and down .2gr before it finally settles at a measurement greatly concerned me in the 1st place. I can take the same exact item and weigh it back to back on that dig. scale and it will read different. Usually within .2gr -Wade-



its just a really sensitive scale you have to let it settle a sec i mean if you wave your hand over the enos scale slowly it will actually take a reading you just have to be slow and perfect with it i love the enos scale and i have a dillon and lee bar scale as backup