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B_RAD
10-25-2010, 22:03
I know the 550b doesn't come with caliber conversion but it's only $10 more than the square deal. I know the square deal is progresive but why wouldn't you buy the 500?

http://www.dillonprecision.com/Dillon_Reloading_Machines-8-1.html

edward5759
10-25-2010, 22:08
Do you ever reload for a Rifle?
If yes get the 550

The square deal used non-standard dies and is for handgun only. :wow:

XDRoX
10-25-2010, 22:10
I know the 550b doesn't come with caliber conversion but it's only $10 more than the square deal. I know the square deal is progresive but why wouldn't you buy the 500?

http://www.dillonprecision.com/Dillon_Reloading_Machines-8-1.html


If you're only loading pistol and a little more speed is important and you don't mind the "Square deal only dies," then the SDB is a deal. These reasons are obviously why it isn't as popular as the 550b, but it still has it's place as a great press.

If I only reloaded a few calibers and really wanted that auto indexing, I'd consider a SDB, but I opted for the 550b, and really like it.

XDRoX
10-25-2010, 22:10
Do you ever reload for a Rifle?
If yes get the 550

The square deal used non-standard dies and is for handgun only. :wow:

Welcome to the forum:wavey:

goatroper2000
10-25-2010, 22:11
You also may want to check your price, the price you have on the 550 is without dies.

fredj338
10-25-2010, 22:19
If you're only loading pistol and a little more speed is important and you don't mind the "Square deal only dies," then the SDB is a deal. These reasons are obviously why it isn't as popular as the 550b, but it still has it's place as a great press.

If I only reloaded a few calibers and really wanted that auto indexing, I'd consider a SDB, but I opted for the 550b, and really like it.
I'm not sure the SDB is any faster than a 550B. The 550B does come w/ one caliber conversion, no dies though. The ability to use cheaper Lee dies is a slight advantage. The more robust construction is a slight advantage. IMO, auto indexing is a slight advantage for the SDB, but it's smaller size & operating window, Dillon only dies & no rifle calibers or 357sig are slight disadvantages.

IndyGunFreak
10-25-2010, 22:21
You also may want to check your price, the price you have on the 550 is without dies.

Yeah, I agree w/ the above.. there's a bigger price difference than $10.

If the SDB used standard dies, I'd get it.. unfortunately, if for some reason Dillon stopped production on SDB stuff.. you're stuck.... Not saying they will, just saying it could happen. I don't load rifle, and really have no intention of loading rifle.. so I could make a SDB work..

IGF

Boxerglocker
10-25-2010, 22:22
One or two handgun only calibers the SDB is a great machine for an easy production rate of 400-500 an hour.

If looking as possibly loading rife or shouldered handgun look for the 550.

IndyGunFreak
10-25-2010, 22:23
Do you ever reload for a Rifle?
If yes get the 550

The square deal used non-standard dies and is for handgun only. :wow:

:wavey:

Watch out for that GioaJack guy... ;)

IGF

fredj338
10-25-2010, 22:24
Yeah, I agree w/ the above.. there's a bigger price difference than $10.

If the SDB used standard dies, I'd get it.. unfortunately, if for some reason Dillon stopped production on SDB stuff.. you're stuck.... Not saying they will, just saying it could happen. I don't load rifle, and really have no intention of loading rifle.. so I could make a SDB work..

IGF
I had no intention of going to Africa or owning a buffalo rifle, but it happens. I had no intention of ever reloading bottle neck pistol rounds or wildcat rounds but it happened. The SBD will limit you. As long as you are ok with that, then buy one. The 550B is expandable, you can load just about anything you can get a shell plate for.

Boxerglocker
10-25-2010, 22:34
I would highly recommend buying a SDB used for the no BS Dillon warranty covers you forever.

http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=116181

VN350X10
10-25-2010, 23:11
I have both (along with a 650, 1050 & a Lee 1000), ALL have a place. I usually suggest that a beginner start with a 550, as it can be used like a turret press, loading 1 round at a time to gain experience.
ALSO, if you have large hands, the SDB is a real bear, it's physical size is much smaller than most "normal" presses.

uncle albert

Boxerglocker
10-26-2010, 00:22
ALSO, if you have large hands, the SDB is a real bear, it's physical size is much smaller than most "normal" presses.


I have no idea how/why everyone comes to this conclusion. I'm not a little guy, have XL size hands and have no problems loading on a SDB. My normal session load rate is 300 in about 40-45 minutes but have timed my max rate at over 450-500 a couple of times and that's not being reckless but looking inside every case and checking powder drops at 100 rounds as I reload the primer feeder. It's all about ergonomics to me, a strongmount, bullet tray and well placed elevated empty case bin make it a snap.

ColdShot
10-26-2010, 04:13
I would not buy any machine that was proprietary like a SDB,plus it looks really small
for the hands area

550 gets the vote

Bren
10-26-2010, 04:33
You also may want to check your price, the price you have on the 550 is without dies.

Which is good, because you'll want to order a set of Lee carbide dies for that - using Dillon dies has never even crossed my mind.

You can't use the Lee dies in a square deal B, far as I know.

If the 550 was $100 more, I'd still go 550. If I couldn't afford the 550, I'd buy another brand, instead of the SDB.

shotgunred
10-26-2010, 04:50
I own a 550. But If I knew what I know now when I bought it I would have gone with the LNL instead. They are both good presses but the LNL AP has an upgrade path with its case feeder. The 550 has a case feeder but it doesn't do rifle rounds and has issues with the 40sw.
I personally wouldn't buy a square deal new because its proprietary and you are limited on what you can load on it. I had no intention of loading rifle rounds when I bought my 550. But now I load 223 and will be loading 30-06 soon.

Bob2223
10-26-2010, 05:58
Yeah, I agree w/ the above.. there's a bigger price difference than $10.

If the SDB used standard dies, I'd get it.. unfortunately, if for some reason Dillon stopped production on SDB stuff.. you're stuck.... Not saying they will, just saying it could happen. I don't load rifle, and really have no intention of loading rifle.. so I could make a SDB work..

IGF

Indy
There are two kinds of loaders, those that load rifle and those that will load rifle. :whistling:


Bob :supergrin:



Bob

Bren
10-26-2010, 08:41
Indy
There are two kinds of loaders, those that load rifle and those that will load rifle. :whistling:


Bob :supergrin:

Bob

But, personally, I've never seen a need to load rifle on a progressive press. If I load rifle rounds it's for accuracy and involves hand weighing each powder charge and being as precise as possible with OAL, etc. I guess if you load .223 in bulk to save money it makes sense, but I've never done that.

GlockMonk
10-26-2010, 09:14
You will eventually have both, or more. So just get what you can afford right now, and be happy with it :supergrin:

By the way, that 550b for $379 does not even come with the conversion kit, plus you still need to buy the dies. So you're looking about $500 for the 550b.

GlockMonk

PS: If you're a rookie reloader, then get the SDB, as most of the die settings are already done at the factory for you.

Colorado4Wheel
10-26-2010, 09:32
I don't know were he found a 550 for $379. They are normally a little over $400 and they come with a conversion kit at that price. Conversion kit includes the powder die, powder funnel and buttons. You still need the dies which are from $30 and up.

Boxerglocker
10-26-2010, 09:34
I don't know were he found a 550 for $379. They are normally a little over $400 and they come with a conversion kit at that price. Conversion kit includes the powder die, powder funnel and buttons. You still need the dies which are from $30 and up.

Enos sells the 550 with no conversion for $379, but why you would buy one as hitting the $400 mark gets you free shipping?

GioaJack
10-26-2010, 10:09
:wavey:

Watch out for that GioaJack guy... ;)

IGF

Pay no attention to IGF, he's never loaded a round in his life... he spends all his time fishing so he can feed his pet penguin.

I have both (along with a 650, 1050 & a Lee 1000), ALL have a place. I usually suggest that a beginner start with a 550, as it can be used like a turret press, loading 1 round at a time to gain experience.
ALSO, if you have large hands, the SDB is a real bear, it's physical size is much smaller than most "normal" presses.

uncle albert

I have no idea how/why everyone comes to this conclusion. I'm not a little guy, have XL size hands and have no problems loading on a SDB. My normal session load rate is 300 in about 40-45 minutes but have timed my max rate at over 450-500 a couple of times and that's not being reckless but looking inside every case and checking powder drops at 100 rounds as I reload the primer feeder. It's all about ergonomics to me, a strongmount, bullet tray and well placed elevated empty case bin make it a snap.


Actually Uncle Albert and the Boxer are both correct when it come to the physical footprint of the SD.

It is considerably smaller than the 550 which could be a plus if you are severely limited on bench space. (It is not so small as to be inefficient or of lesser quality.)

For the average person, even with large hands its size really poses no problems, especially after one has become accustomed to the machine. I've had one for well over 15 years and never had a lick of problems until the last few years.

Just as Fred has no plans to travel to Africa and miss a shot on a world record bull elephant many of us had no plans to develop arthritis, in my case rheumatoid arthritis in our hands. This is where the smaller footprint of the SD becomes a deterrent. It can be very painful and result in clumsiness when trying to maneuver cases and bullets into the fairly tight confines. This is in no way the machine's fault, it's just one of those little things that happens in life that we sometimes give no thought to.

You've received excellent information in the preceding posts which hopefully will make your decision both easier and well informed. Your budget is none of my business but assuming you are willing and able to make the investment it would appear that you have three viable candidates from which to choose; the Square Deal, the 550 and the Hornady LNL. (All three machines come with exactly the same warranty and both companies take a great deal of pride in their customer service. I relate this from personal experience since I own and operate all three machines.)

Of the three machines the Square Deal offers the most operating restrictions and least amount of future loading options. Of the last two the 550 has the longest history, (a very good history) but for very little more money, (in the future or at initial purchase) a case feeder can be added to the LNL which pretty much puts it on par with the Dillon 650.

What ever machine you decide on you can't really make a mistake, you will simply be dictating which direction your short term loading career will take.

Good luck, have fun, don't blow nothin' up. :supergrin:


Jack

AJE
10-26-2010, 11:09
I bought a SDB. I didn't have much desire to load rifle rounds, or .357 SIG.

The only thing I don't care fore is the specific dies you have to use, but it doesn't bother me that much. I don't reload for precision really, I do it for volume and bulk prices.

You also can use the SDB to load one, or two at a time. I do that when loading testing rounds, both so I can weigh each powder charge, and keep a better eye on the OAL (the XTP doesn't match up too well with the seating stem on the die). I simply have the button out of the press at the bullet seating station, and only put a case in every other cycle.

Boxerglocker
10-26-2010, 12:20
I bought a SDB. I didn't have much desire to load rifle rounds, or .357 SIG.

The only thing I don't care fore is the specific dies you have to use, but it doesn't bother me that much. I don't reload for precision really, I do it for volume and bulk prices.

You also can use the SDB to load one, or two at a time. I do that when loading testing rounds, both so I can weigh each powder charge, and keep a better eye on the OAL (the XTP doesn't match up too well with the seating stem on the die). I simply have the button out of the press at the bullet seating station, and only put a case in every other cycle.

If your wanting consistent OAL in a SDB it's imperative that the shellplate is as snug as possible though rotates freely and that ALL stations are loaded when setting the seating stem.
I took my 9mm RN seating stem and broke the edge off with 800 grit wet/dry sandpaper followed by polishing with a dremel felt cone and flitz polish... it matched pretty much every bullet profile very nicely there on afterwards including the XTP. :supergrin:

AJE
10-26-2010, 12:34
If your wanting consistent OAL in a SDB it's imperative that the shellplate is as snug as possible though rotates freely and that ALL stations are loaded when setting the seating stem.
I took my 9mm RN seating stem and broke the edge off with 800 grit wet/dry sandpaper followed by polishing with a dremel felt cone and flitz polish... it matched pretty much every bullet profile very nicely there on afterwards including the XTP. :supergrin:

I don't think its a problem with the press. Every other bullet I load is great, and always withing a couple thousandths of an inch from each other.

Some of the XTPs will come out .01 longer than the other loaded rounds, and it will show a ring around them where they contact the stem and it compresses them.

I need to get an extra stem on my next order from Dillon to experiment with. There are always a small list of things I end up forgetting when I order :whistling:

Boxerglocker
10-26-2010, 12:43
I don't think its a problem with the press. Every other bullet I load is great, and always withing a couple thousandths of an inch from each other.

Some of the XTPs will come out .01 longer than the other loaded rounds, and it will show a ring around them where they contact the stem and it compresses them.

I need to get an extra stem on my next order from Dillon to experiment with. There are always a small list of things I end up forgetting when I order :whistling:

That deburr and polishing trick I described will fix this problem.

PCJim
10-26-2010, 15:00
Go with the 550b or LNL. Don't limit your options!

Bello
10-26-2010, 16:34
Yeah, I agree w/ the above.. there's a bigger price difference than $10.

If the SDB used standard dies, I'd get it.. unfortunately, if for some reason Dillon stopped production on SDB stuff.. you're stuck.... Not saying they will, just saying it could happen. I don't load rifle, and really have no intention of loading rifle.. so I could make a SDB work..

IGF


im still surprised no one has made some type of reducer bushings for the sdb to accept regular dies! id be all over one if that happened

B_RAD
10-26-2010, 17:02
Wow! Didn't expect this many replies. Thanks for all the comments. Let me tell y'all a little about my self. I've had a 550 but sold it. Stupid, I know. I had no problems with it but I have no urge to load riffle. All I want to do is load 9mm and .45 acp. Just going to start out with 9mm. I don't care that I can't use Lee or anyone elses dies. The link I posted had a 550 for $10 more than the square deal. It comes without caliber conversion but I thought the price for the 550 was more? Am I missing somethig? I know it's a little more for the dies and caliber conversion but for only $10(+dies and CC) I'm thinking 550. Though, the simplicity of the square deal is appealing to me.



http://www.dillonprecision.com/Dillon_Reloading_Machines-8-1.html

Colorado4Wheel
10-26-2010, 17:13
Price the SDB, 550 and LnL with Dies, caliber conversions etc. THEN, start pondering the options.

Brian Enos is the place to do that comparison on Dillon stuff because his site makes it so easy.

LnL you need to price the press, shellplate and dies. Look at Manventure Outpost and Midway USA. Manventure is cheaper.

thebriarman
10-26-2010, 17:32
Much more versatile and, if you ever decide to get out of reloading, they always seem to be in demand! Good luck!

shotgunred
10-26-2010, 18:23
Price the SDB, 550 and LnL with Dies, caliber conversions etc. THEN, start pondering the options.

Brian Enos is the place to do that comparison on Dillon stuff because his site makes it so easy.

LnL you need to price the press, shellplate and dies. Look at Manventure Outpost and Midway USA. Manventure is cheaper.

Ran the numbers just for fun.
650 at B.E. for 2 calibers.Purchase Total: $ 869.30
LNL AP at midway for 2 calibers $838.23 plus shipping $63.00 $902.23
LNL AP at Manventure for 2 calibers plus shipping $773.8.

Colorado4Wheel
10-26-2010, 18:37
Ran the numbers just for fun.
650 at B.E. for 2 calibers.Purchase Total: $ 869.30
LNL AP at midway for 2 calibers $838.23 plus shipping $63.00 $902.23
LNL AP at Manventure for 2 calibers plus shipping $773.8.

So what dies did you use? Same for all of them I hope?
Manventure would also have shipping I would think?
And that was a 650 price. 550 would be cheaper I am sure.

I did tell him to look at the LnL because of the price. I knew it would be cheaper. Kinda suprised it's only $90 then a 650.

fredj338
10-26-2010, 18:47
Wow! Though, the simplicity of the square deal is appealing to me.


http://www.dillonprecision.com/Dillon_Reloading_Machines-8-1.html
IMO, the 550B is a "simpler" press to run. It was my first progressive & I still use one, but also run a 650. If you are fine NEVER reloading rifle or 357sig, 44/40, 38/40, then the SDB will certainly turn out a lot of quality ammo in a hurry. I just don't like limiting myself.:dunno:

shotgunred
10-26-2010, 18:50
So what dies did you use? Same for all of them I hope?
Manventure would also have shipping I would think?
And that was a 650 price. 550 would be cheaper I am sure.

I did tell him to look at the LnL because of the price. I knew it would be cheaper. Kinda suprised it's only $90 then a 650.

those were with case feeders.
550 at B.E. for 2 calibers Purchase Total: $ 451.40
No case feeder. case feeder for 550 with 2 calibers Purchase Total: $ 740.25


None of those prices include dies. So what was the total again on the classic turret?

Hydraulicman
10-26-2010, 18:57
If you have a single stage for rifle the SDB might be a good choice.

I bought my 550B for 9mm

Now I load 9mm, 38/357, 45 auto, 357sig


I do have a single stage but loading on the 550 is more fun for me.

Colorado4Wheel
10-26-2010, 19:17
those were with case feeders.
550 at B.E. for 2 calibers Purchase Total: $ 451.40
No case feeder. case feeder for 550 with 2 calibers Purchase Total: $ 740.25


None of those prices include dies. So what was the total again on the classic turret?

IC. Casefeeder is not a great concept to add to this conversation as it's not a option for the SDB.

LCT cost about $230