electronic scales [Archive] - Glock Talk

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shotgunred
10-26-2010, 17:17
What do you have?
What do you like?
Who has the best deal on one?

CitizenOfDreams
10-26-2010, 17:30
Here is what I have. It is not a good reloading scale, but it works for me, and the price is right ($50 MSRP, $40 retail).

http://www.americanweigh.com/images/DIA-20_main.jpg

Bello
10-26-2010, 17:44
http://www.brianenos.com/store/img/b.scale.jpg

i have this scale which i got from brianenos.com its pretty damn good and accurate after its been on a few minutes. i found it way cheaper on uniquetek. like 20 bucks less then enos i was kinda upset but whatever also it comes with a 20 year warranty from the factory so i thought it was a steal! i give it a 9 out of 10 imho. same as box i also have two beam scales a decent lee that gives me no problems and a dillon beam this scale wanders on start up but you have to let them get a lil warm or leave them on a few mins then this thing is on par with my beam scales as stated before awesome run on sentence huh?

Boxerglocker
10-26-2010, 17:48
What do you have?
What do you like?
Who has the best deal on one?

I have the Dillon D-Terminator Electronic Scale actually bought it from Cabelas when the offered on of those get $20 off a purchase of $120.
Ordered a case for it later when I needed some odds and ends from Dillon.
It's a "great" scale... I mentioned before in other post that I had it tested at our calibration lab at work. It's considered on PAR and could easily be certified for aerospace use. I have a set of check weights to verify once in a while but honestly haven't really needed to much.
I know all the Beam scale proponets will chime in, and say... batteries, wanders, I don't trust them, la di da.... it works and well....
I have a beam for back-up (used Dillon) but other than checking it out once in a while never use it. It's boxed up somewhere.

GioaJack
10-26-2010, 18:13
I've only had two scales, (still have both) in over 45 years. An Ohaus beam and a RCBS digital that is about 12-15 years old.

The RCBS doesn't even have a number on it but has two check weights, no battery option and the sticker on the bottom of it says 'Manufactured by PACT'.

Don't really need either one, I just cram as much powder into a case as I can then hammer a bullet on top of it. One of these days I'll get around to reading that manual.


Jack

fredj338
10-26-2010, 18:44
Cheap digital scale are just that for the most part. I haven't seen one yet under $100 that works well. I also have a D-Term from Dillon, always zeros quickly & holds zero throughout the reloading session. Always accurate too. I also hear the RCBS is of sim quality, but won't trust the cheaper models I have seen. PRobably why Lee doesn't make a digital scale.:rofl:

njl
10-26-2010, 18:46
I have a Lyman XP1000. I'm seriously leaning towards buying a beam scale...but might roll the dice again with electric and try a Jennings. My lyman drifts, needs frequent recalibration, and sometimes I put powder on it, and get no reading at all. I guess I'm lucky I haven't blown up a gun yet with it.

PCJim
10-26-2010, 19:19
Whatever you decide, do not get the $30 FA scale from MidwayUSA. You'd be better off giving the funds to that fella on the curb outside the local QuikMart.

Colorado4Wheel
10-26-2010, 19:24
I have been itching to try this thing. Longer warranty, better price. Looks appealing.

http://www.oldwillknottscales.com/my-weigh-ibalance-201.aspx

http://www.oldwillknottscales.com/myweigh/ibalance-101-201.jpg

FLSlim
10-27-2010, 07:30
Dillon D-term has been excellent for me. I tried an inexpensive scale some time ago and just couldn't depend on it. I wouldn't use it without going back to my beam scale to verify--so why bother in the first place.

ron59
10-27-2010, 07:38
Cheap digital scale are just that for the most part. I haven't seen one yet under $100 that works well. I also have a D-Term from Dillon, always zeros quickly & holds zero throughout the reloading session. Always accurate too. I also hear the RCBS is of sim quality, but won't trust the cheaper models I have seen. PRobably why Lee doesn't make a digital scale.:rofl:

Fred.

The scale that Bello showed is *recommended* by BE... that was enough for me. I bought mine through UniqueTek, who also sells quality products. I have the Dillon beam scale, but think this little digital does a much better job.

I will eventually buy a more expensive digital scale, but this thing is pretty dang good.

njl
10-27-2010, 07:40
I did some loading last night and the Lyman was just about as freaky as ever. I think I was loading 4.4gr Universal...but who knows. It really pisses me off when I crank the powder measure lower (I have one of those Home Depot dials on it and clearly marked which way is more powder, so I know I wasn't turning it the wrong way) and the scale says my charges are getting heavier.

I ordered a Dillon beam scale from Brian Enos last night.

Anyone want to buy a lightly used Lyman XP1000? Damn thing is out of warranty...so sending it back to Lyman is out.

This thing is fine for differentiating 115gr bullets from 124gr, but I don't trust it any more for weighing small numbers of grains for powder charges.

I've tried using it on just a fresh 9V battery, just the AC adapter, and with both. It doesn't seem to make any difference.

Big Bore Fan
10-27-2010, 08:56
I've been using the Dillon Terminator sence early summer and it's been great. This is my first scale and was a little worried because of all the horrer stories I've read on here about digital scales, but the Dillon has been 100%. I've neaver had any problems with temp. change and I alwas use cheak weights before I start loading. I even heard someone say you need a dedicated power line for digital scales. I have the scale a radio and a window a/c unit all pluged into the same surge protector and it's been fine.

gforester
10-27-2010, 09:35
I picked up one of these and it works great!

http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q285/gforester/PACTscale.jpg

Midway sells them for about $130.

GioaJack
10-27-2010, 09:48
I picked up one of these and it works great!

http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q285/gforester/PACTscale.jpg

Midway sells them for about $130.



My RCBS, (made by PACT), is very similar to this one with the exception of the pan being metal and shaped different and the entire thing being RCBS green.

It would appear the price has come down over the years but it still works as good as the day it was new.


Jack

gforester
10-27-2010, 10:38
Jack,
I liked the shape of the powder pan that came with it. I hated that it was plastic. Static tends to make powder adhere to the sides from time to time. I swapped the pan out for the metal one that came with my Hornady scale. I think I am going to look for a different pan for it.

GioaJack
10-27-2010, 10:46
If life was perfect I'd wake up with Heather Locklear and Jessica Alba in my bed every morning... but sometimes ya just gotta roll with the flow.

Try wiping the plastic pan with a static cling dryer sheet every once in a while. Should do away with the problem. The shape actually looks pretty good, I like the fact that it appears to be deeper than the metal pans I've had... may help keep powder from bouncing out when you drop a charge directly into the pan. :dunno:


Jack

Crimp
10-27-2010, 10:53
I made a special trip (2 hours) to my nearest Cabela's to pick up one of their $80.00 XT-1500 loading scales:

http://img829.imageshack.us/img829/9486/xt1500.jpg

This comes in a really nice package with calibration weights and weighs items really well and accurately. It uses batteries or AC. The one problem is, this scale doesn't read correctly when you're trickling powder into the pan!

For instance, you can put a scoop of powder in the pan, then start trickling to get your desired weight. If you trickle really slowly, the scales don't indicate a weight increase at all! I found I could completely load up the pan and the scales weight never changed.

I believe what happens is that the scale continually checks and re-zeros unless there is a notable increase of weight placed on the pan. I also believe many of the cheaper scales do the same thing, so if you want to buy one, you need to check out whether it will allow trickling of powder.

If all you're concerned with is to check a thrown weight, then they would probably be OK. If you want to replace a beam scale and use it for weighing trickled loads, forget it.

Even though I really liked this scale and wanted it to work, I made another special trip to Cabela's and returned it.

Bob2223
10-27-2010, 11:20
Used to think I wanted a fancy high tech electric scale but I think I'm over it.

The old 505 still works.

Bob

PCJim
10-27-2010, 11:52
Used to think I wanted a fancy high tech electric scale but I think I'm over it.

The old 505 still works.

Bob

^ what he said....

Colorado4Wheel
10-27-2010, 12:06
All the concern about wondering if you digital is accurate can be solved with some check weights. EVEN IF YOUR TOO CHEAP to buy them you can just make some Reference Weights that will insure your scale is consistent. Consistent is as important (if not more in some ways) then accuracy. Accuracy is far less important then working up your loads in a safe fashion and having a consistent scale to return to that same spot time and time again. Obviously, if accuracy is to far off then you are not starting at a safe point. But as long as it's close you can work it up and be safe.

Boxerglocker
10-27-2010, 12:38
I made a special trip (2 hours) to my nearest Cabela's to pick up one of their $80.00 XT-1500 loading scales:

http://img829.imageshack.us/img829/9486/xt1500.jpg

This comes in a really nice package with calibration weights and weighs items really well and accurately. It uses batteries or AC. The one problem is, this scale doesn't read correctly when you're trickling powder into the pan!

For instance, you can put a scoop of powder in the pan, then start trickling to get your desired weight. If you trickle really slowly, the scales don't indicate a weight increase at all! I found I could completely load up the pan and the scales weight never changed.

I believe what happens is that the scale continually checks and re-zeros unless there is a notable increase of weight placed on the pan. I also believe many of the cheaper scales do the same thing, so if you want to buy one, you need to check out whether it will allow trickling of powder.

If all you're concerned with is to check a thrown weight, then they would probably be OK. If you want to replace a beam scale and use it for weighing trickled loads, forget it.

Even though I really liked this scale and wanted it to work, I made another special trip to Cabela's and returned it.

I tried that scale and had the same result "junk" I'm leary of anything in that catagory with the Cabelas name brand on it. You know if they can mark it down 25% later on down the line it's only worth 25% of what the original price listed was in the first place.

Colorado4Wheel
10-27-2010, 12:49
You gotta know Cabelas doesn't make scales, neither does Dillon. So anything you get from a "reloading equipment manufacture" is just another companies (a real scale manufacturer) product marked up depending on the name you are buying. I think you may very will be better off going to the maker of these scales (Jennings, MAC, My Weight). They have a much longer warranty, actually will service it themselves during that time. 20 years is not uncommon. Your buying their scale anyway, might as well get it from the source with less of a markup.

Boxerglocker
10-27-2010, 13:17
You gotta know Cabelas doesn't make scales, neither does Dillon. So anything you get from a "reloading equipment manufacture" is just another companies (a real scale manufacturer) product marked up depending on the name you are buying. I think you may very will be better off going to the maker of these scales (Jennings, MAC, My Weight). They have a much longer warranty, actually will service it themselves during that time. 20 years is not uncommon. Your buying their scale anyway, might as well get it from the source with less of a markup.

I realise that Steve. Cabelas however has alot more buying power than Dillon does. Dillon being noted as a reloading specialist, IMO takes a little more time to scrutinize the product they put thier name on. Thier markup is most likely minimal compared to Cabelas. Such as the BE scale, you know Brian has done his research prior to endorsing such a product.
If I ever at one point need to look at buying another I indeed would look at spending the money and going directly to a manufacturer, they have thier pitfalls too though... such as warranty replacement/repair lead times and such. If everyone had a no BS warranty policy such as Dillon does with their presses, the world would be a happier place no doubt. But then again everything would be initially unaffordable.
I in my carreer have only bought the best I could for tools, Snan-On, Mac, etc..... I agree in most cases more money spent now is better than spending it again later. However, in other situations it may be just the opposite.
My family owns a furniture manufactuering business in Indonesia, supplies products to big name high end stores here in the US (Pottery Barn and the likes orders 10-12K bar stools). You don't wanna know what there mark up is.... in alot of cases... 25% of original retail and they are still making a 200-300% profit. That's no lie.

fredj338
10-27-2010, 13:18
I tried that scale and had the same result "junk" I'm leary of anything in that catagory with the Cabelas name brand on it. You know if they can mark it down 25% later on down the line it's only worth 25% of what the original price listed was in the first place.I bought one too, when my 1st Dillon D went down. I wouldn't call it junk, but I did get rid of it when Dillon replaced my D w/a new one. I found the Cabel's quirky, not wanting to hold zero or come to zero quickly, plus the small display doesn't work for my old eyes.:cool:

Boxerglocker
10-27-2010, 13:25
I bought one too, when my 1st Dillon D went down. I wouldn't call it junk, but I did get rid of it when Dillon replaced my D w/a new one. I found the Cabel's quirky, not wanting to hold zero or come to zero quickly, plus the small display doesn't work for my old eyes.:cool:

I could never get mine to hold zero... hence my term Junk.

freakshow10mm
10-27-2010, 13:28
I have a Neva digital off Fleabay. $30 shipped a few years ago.

Bello
10-27-2010, 14:33
Fred.

The scale that Bello showed is *recommended* by BE... that was enough for me. I bought mine through UniqueTek, who also sells quality products. I have the Dillon beam scale, but think this little digital does a much better job.

I will eventually buy a more expensive digital scale, but this thing is pretty dang good.


aren't you lucky for my lil tip :tongueout:

IndyGunFreak
10-27-2010, 15:36
http://www.brianenos.com/store/img/b.scale.jpg

i have this scale which i got from brianenos.com its pretty damn good and accurate after its been on a few minutes. i found it way cheaper on uniquetek. like 20 bucks less then enos i was kinda upset but whatever also it comes with a 20 year warranty from the factory so i thought it was a steal! i give it a 9 out of 10 imho. same as box i also have two beam scales a decent lee that gives me no problems and a dillon beam this scale wanders on start up but you have to let them get a lil warm or leave them on a few mins then this thing is on par with my beam scales as stated before awesome run on sentence huh?
Fred.

The scale that Bello showed is *recommended* by BE... that was enough for me. I bought mine through UniqueTek, who also sells quality products. I have the Dillon beam scale, but think this little digital does a much better job.

I will eventually buy a more expensive digital scale, but this thing is pretty dang good.

I don't own the scale, but if you read wrx04's thread here in the forum(still on Page 1)... he's not happy w/ that scale...

http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1277493

Used to think I wanted a fancy high tech electric scale but I think I'm over it.

The old 505 still works.

Bob

:thumbsup:

IGF

Colorado4Wheel
10-27-2010, 16:08
Send it back if it doesn't work. Get some check weights to confirm the scale is right. Let it warm up before using it. I would never buy a scale that did not plug in for that reason. I used to get beat up for recommending a beam to everyone. Different group of people around here now.

davesretired1
10-27-2010, 22:31
Finally got below 115 in the garage ( gotta love AZ summers ), and I was able to run some new .45 acp loads in different powders using the Dillon electronic scale I bought used on E-Bay. I compared the readings with a Dillon beam scale. In all cases, they were within .1 of each other. I'll take that any day. All loads tested were in the 5.8-6.4 range. I'll probably keep comparing for a while just to be sure, but it sure is a lot easier on my eyes looking at a digital readout, versus the small marks on the beam scale. So far, so good.

RHVEtte
10-27-2010, 22:53
I picked up a used Ohaus at the Indy 1500 (I know, I know, but the price was right.) Stole a few check weights from the lab, and what do you know, it's still accurate. Not a bad deal for $30 considering it's good for up to 500 grains.

ron59
10-28-2010, 05:31
aren't you lucky for my lil tip :tongueout:

Bought mine 6 months ago.... :supergrin:

ron59
10-28-2010, 05:39
I don't own the scale, but if you read wrx04's thread here in the forum(still on Page 1)... he's not happy w/ that scale...

http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1277493


IGF

I participated in that thread, but neglected to see where he said that. I have since re-read the thread and responded to that statement.

I would bet money that there is an air current while he was weighing that charge, I've had the same thing happen to me. I didn't see any other responses mention that possibility to him.

The instructions explicitly warn against that (and I've read other posters state that THEIR digital scale instructions say the same thing). When I removed the air current (closed the garage door)... the problem he described went away.

I suppose it is possible that he "got a bad one"... my money is on an air current. Those digital scales *are* sensitive. But I've had the same issue with my Dillon beam scale if there was much of a detectable air current.

Bello
10-28-2010, 14:40
I don't own the scale, but if you read wrx04's thread here in the forum(still on Page 1)... he's not happy w/ that scale...

http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1277493



:thumbsup:

IGF

Indy he is a uber new reloader and you cant just take on that scale like that!

ron59
10-28-2010, 15:17
Indy he is a uber new reloader and you cant just take on that scale like that!

My thoughts exactly.

Colorado4Wheel
10-28-2010, 15:32
The scale I recommended has a complete wind screen. Basically a clear box you put over the entire weighting area to prevent wind from upsetting the reading.

Also, replace the batteries just to be sure thats not the issue. It does happen. Another reason I like the corded models

njl
10-28-2010, 15:49
The hinged cover on my Lyman XP1000 was one of the reasons I bought it. I do see a difference in readings with the cover open or closed. OTOH, I can see a difference in readings just by waiting a few minutes too.

What do you people do with beam scales like Dillon's (I should have mine in a few days)? I'm curious to see what the Dillon says my RL550 is dropping and what the past 150 rounds I loaded really are.

PCJim
10-28-2010, 16:24
What do you people do with beam scales like Dillon's (I should have mine in a few days)?

Not really sure what you mean by "do with beam scales". We usually use a beam scale (regardless of make) just as one would use a digital, but feel much more comfortable with what we can see actually occurring. There is no "maybe it is right" with a beam scale. Zero it after you place it in position on your bench, set your poises to your desired weight and begin setting your powder charge.

I'm curious to see......what the past 150 rounds I loaded really are.

You can pretty much forget that, unless you intend to spend some time dismantling what you've made. There will be enough variances in the case and possibly bullet weights that you cannot definitively determine what charge level is in your assembled rounds. You "may" be able to determine whether you have a powderless round, but even that is questionable.

Sonnytoo
10-28-2010, 17:55
RCBS RangeMaster 750, probably $100 or so. It's been good, has btty and AC. The zero will float a bit when you first turn it on, but then settles down and behaves just fine after it's on for 1/2 hour. I generally leave mine on for days at a time when I'm loading.
And RCBS is about the best in Customer Service. I told them my first one was floating the zero, and they said send it back. I did; got a new one right away. I've had it two yrs or so.
Sure beats the heck out of the beam balance I've had for 40 yrs or more, although that Ohaus 505 model sure is a good one...but slooowww compared with digital.
Sonnytoo

Sonnytoo
10-28-2010, 18:30
You "may" be able to determine whether you have a powderless round, but even that is questionable.

Wow, that must be a lousy scale. My RCBS is very stable after it's on for 15 minutes and my check weights are "perfect."
I weighed ten 230gr bullets and the max deviation is one grain, with an average deviation of 0.56 grains.
With my ten Starline cases, .45 ACP, max deviation is 1.0 grain with an average deviation of 0.3 grains.
I ALWAYS weigh "finished" ammo used for hunting or important stuff. And many of my .44Mag or .45Colt hunting loads use 15-20 grains of powder. But even with my wimpy 5-grain targets loads for my .45 ACP model 36, it is duck-soup simple to find a load that has no powder.
If "maximum bad" happened, my light load combined with light case would be two grains short. It would take at least five grains short before I'd get concerned.
A powderless round? Yeah, I think it's "easy" to find.
Sonnytoo

njl
10-28-2010, 19:12
Not really sure what you mean by "do with beam scales". We usually use a beam scale (regardless of make) just as one would use a digital, but feel much more comfortable with what we can see actually occurring. There is no "maybe it is right" with a beam scale. Zero it after you place it in position on your bench, set your poises to your desired weight and begin setting your powder charge.


What I mean is, some (but certainly not all) digital scales have a cover that can be closed over the sample tray to isolate the tray from wind currents and get a more accurate reading. With a beam scale, you really can't do that (at least not without a much bigger cover). Does the magnetic dampening make the scale resist the sort of movement that air currents might cause?


You can pretty much forget that, unless you intend to spend some time dismantling what you've made. There will be enough variances in the case and possibly bullet weights that you cannot definitively determine what charge level is in your assembled rounds. You "may" be able to determine whether you have a powderless round, but even that is questionable.

Right...but without messing with the powder bar, given the same powder, what I drop for powder charges this weekend should be the same as what I was dropping the other night. So, I'm going to stop loading, and not mess with the powder bar, until the new scale arrives, drop a few charges, and see if they're 4.4gr (on both scales).

PCJim
10-28-2010, 19:35
Magnetic dampening does eliminate some of the effects of air currents but trust me, the ol' 5-0-5 will still move around on you if there is an air duct or garage fan nearby. I look at it as a confirmation that the scale is still sensitive. I can still see mine move when I trickle charge flakes of Unique.

On the confirmation of the current powder charge bar setting, I understand. Remember to throw several settling charges prior to taking your weigh samples so that you mimic your reloading operation.

njl
10-30-2010, 19:10
My Lyman must have known its days were numbered. The Dillon beam scale arrived today. I just powered the Lyman up, and let it sit while I setup the Dillon. Then I threw a few charges and weighed them on both scales. With 5 charges combined, I got readings within 0.1gr on the two scales...confirming that what I thought was about 4.35gr last loading session actually was somewhere between 4.34 and 4.36gr.

One thing that was a bit disconcerting...the setup instructions say that the scale if setup on a level surface ought to be close to zero, and to finish zeroing it with the adjustable foot on the left side. Mine wasn't anywhere near zero...and I had to let the foot way out. It seems to work well enough, so I suspect the instructions aren't quite right.

dudel
10-30-2010, 19:49
Used to think I wanted a fancy high tech electric scale but I think I'm over it.

The old 505 still works.

Bob
I guess I'm in the same boat. The Hornady beam scale continues to work fine for the pas 20 years (I've gotten my money's worth from that) I don't have to wait for it to warm up. I don't have to plug it in. I don't have got keep batteries for it. I don't have to keep using check weights to ensure it's working. As long as I can see the beam settle, I know all is well.

I do have a cheap digital scale. It handy for the count feature. Weigh 10 units, push a button, dump in a bunch of stuff, and it tells you how many there are (cases, projectiles, etc).

I tend to agree with Fred. Any digital under $100 isn't coming on my bench. Currently, it's not worth $100 to me, to replace the current beam scale.

dudel
10-30-2010, 19:53
Magnetic dampening does eliminate some of the effects of air currents but trust me, the ol' 5-0-5 will still move around on you if there is an air duct or garage fan nearby. I look at it as a confirmation that the scale is still sensitive. I can still see mine move when I trickle charge flakes of Unique.
.

That's why mine resides in a wall cabinet. Shielded from drafts, and at eye level to eliminate parralax readings.

PCJim
10-31-2010, 21:00
One thing that was a bit disconcerting...the setup instructions say that the scale if setup on a level surface ought to be close to zero, and to finish zeroing it with the adjustable foot on the left side. Mine wasn't anywhere near zero...and I had to let the foot way out. It seems to work well enough, so I suspect the instructions aren't quite right.

Don't be that concerned with whether it is near zero out of the box. Depending upon where I set up my 5-0-5 (coffeetable, kitchen table, loading bench), it may need adjustment - sometimes a relatively "major" adjustment in the scheme of things. I keep a 1/4" piece of twist tie close at hand to add weight to the hanging pan holder when necessary, sometimes I have to add a small torn off piece of paper. If either is used, it is placed on the swinging holder and the pan placed on top of it. You may also be able to add additional weight to the swinging holder itself if it has a plate with a small screw on the top side. I believe mine has two or three very small flakes of something in there, probably placed there long ago by the Ohaus factory.

Regardless of any additional counterweight you might have to add to the pan side, as long as the scale is zeroing when the poises are set to zero, you can feel confident that all is well.

njl
10-31-2010, 23:40
My Dillon also sounds like its got some loose ballast in the pan holder. One thing that was a little annoying was in my first session using it, it seemed like its zero would wander a bit...and I kept having to adjust the foot almost every time I removed/replaced the powder tray.