Whats the worst mistake/accident you've had as a reloader? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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wrx04
10-27-2010, 19:34
I've shot about 250 of my reloads now, and they have all worked flawlessly, with the exception of two weak loads that didnt cycle the gun fully. So far, so good.

I was wondering whats the worst thing you experienced guys have done (and heart attacks dont count!:tongueout:).....double charge/kaboom/lead poisoning/firing after a squib/etc...? Just curious.

I have heard of a couple guys getting lead poisoning, but not much besides that. Later.

Colorado4Wheel
10-27-2010, 19:40
I had a case rupture on a batch of test loads I was testing for work up on the chrono. I don't know if it was because of severe leading because the chrono results had a 150 fps or so spread. That was with a sub 950 fps load. Either way it was weird and a little disconcerting to see a flap like door on the base of one of my 9mm cases. For what it's worth I felt nothing when I fired the rounds. Clearly it was too much of a charge for that bullet combo.

AJE
10-27-2010, 19:45
Fortuneatly I haven't blown anything up. My mistakes so far have only worked to aggravate me.

1. Hit my chronograph. Self explanatory :steamed:

2. Loaded a bunch of different 10mm loads to test out over the chronograph. Had them spaced out in the plastic ammo boxes with a piece of paper describing which was which loading. Walked out the door, dropped them, and tossed every damn one of them out into the driveway. All in the same new brass, same premium quality bullets, testing different powder, charge, and primer combinations... in other words, no way to put them back in any sort of order.

It was then I learned to start marking each cartridge with a marker (1 mark for load A, 2 marks for load B, etc) prior to them leaving the bench. I took a good testing session opportunity and turned in to an expensive plinking session, wasting almost a full box of XTPs.

1006
10-27-2010, 19:48
I had the frame of a USP Compact in 40 caliber destroyed when a case ruptured. I had to send it to HK for a frame, barrel, and extractor. I don't use Tightgroup in this gun anymore. My load was right out of the reloading book.

No one can be certain weather it was a double charge or a case of bullet set back. I always thought it was likely a double charge, but later a Law Officer shooting department issued factory ammo had one come apart in the same way.

LoadedTech
10-27-2010, 19:58
Im not as "experienced" as most here but have loaded a few k rounds of .40 and 38/.357. I have had one squib, not sure how it was shorted powder, and a few sideways primers, no KB's. Knocked on wood

wrx04
10-27-2010, 20:21
I had the frame of a USP Compact in 40 caliber destroyed when a case ruptured. I had to send it to HK for a frame, barrel, and extractor. I don't use Tightgroup in this gun anymore. My load was right out of the reloading book.

No one can be certain weather it was a double charge or a case of bullet set back. I always thought it was likely a double charge, but later a Law Officer shooting department issued factory ammo had one come apart in the same way.

YIKES:wow: Did you get hurt?

And now for a dumb question....what is "bullet setback"? I've heard the term a million times, but i dont know what it means.

GioaJack
10-27-2010, 20:25
Never tug on Superman's cape, never try to race a junk yard dog, never poke a bear with a stick, never try to push a heavy box up a set of stairs, and...











never have your face over a filled primer tube when testing the theory of 'sympathetic detonation'.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_4096.jpg?1288232402

Some of the dumber things shall remain unspoken of. :whistling:


Jack

IndyGunFreak
10-27-2010, 20:31
I dropped a box of bullets on my foot. ;)

Just kidding... I've been pretty lucky.. I've had some squibs.. but nothing catastrophic.

IGF

wrx04
10-27-2010, 20:37
Jack, you had that accident reloading almost EXACTLY 10 years before i was born!!:wow: These ex-wives you speak of are probably old enough to be my grandma:tongueout:

PCJim
10-27-2010, 20:45
Nothing serious yet, thank our great Lord above.

I did scare myself last year at the range - pulled the trigger on a 45 Gov't and smoke erupted from the still closed chamber. I waited the requisite 30 seconds, then some more. I didn't want a hangfire to decide it was time to get its act together while I was retrieving the round. Still leary, I finally racked the slide allowing the round to extract. Low and behold, the primer had been seated backwards!

After a few good chuckles to myself for what I had done, I gave the round to the RO to add to his collection. :cool:

robin303
10-27-2010, 20:45
I have had 4 squibs out of 12,000 reloads. :embarassed: Haven't had one in the last 3 months.

GioaJack
10-27-2010, 20:48
Jack, you had that accident reloading almost EXACTLY 10 years before i was born!!:wow: These ex-wives you speak of are probably old enough to be my grandma:tongueout:


Isn't there some kind of rule against these wise-ass young'uns being able to post on here?

And I saw your post about groups at 25 yards over on 1911... stay off the net and get out there and learn to shoot rookie, with one hand on your hind legs like a real man. It's simple it just takes practice... and practice and practice and practice...

It's so easy even a 'GRANDMA' can do it... can you? :supergrin:


Jack

Colorado4Wheel
10-27-2010, 20:57
I have had 4 squibs out of 12,000 reloads. :embarassed: Haven't had one in the last 3 months.

I haven't had squib since I got rid of my Load Master.

PCJim
10-27-2010, 20:58
And now for a dumb question....what is "bullet setback"? I've heard the term a million times, but i dont know what it means.

Bullet setback - when the recoil of a fired round causes the bullet in other loaded rounds in your cylinder or magazine to become seated deeper inside their respective cases due to improper case tension.

The simple test to determine whether you have enough case tension on the bullet is to take your reloaded round, note the COL, press the bullet end against a hard surface with significant but not overbearing force, and remeasure COL. There should be no change in the COL measured. If there is, you run the risk of bullet setback and will need to re-examine your reloading procedures (die adjustments).

stewiegriffin
10-27-2010, 21:36
I havent had an accident (knock on wood) I use a RCBS Lock-Out die on my press. When I didnt use one, I looked in each case before seating. It's easy to get careless on a progressive but if you're careless, well, you know what can happen.

Brucev
10-27-2010, 21:40
Once upon a time I was loading .45 ACP w/ 200 gr. SC over a mild charge of Unique. Some how or other I must have double charged a round. Upon firing there was heavy recoil. The case ejected violently hitting me square in the forehead. The case was badly bulged. There was no other damage to the pistol. That is the one and only screw up I've had in 30 years of reloading.

ilgunguygt
10-27-2010, 22:04
Bullet setback - when the recoil of a fired round causes the bullet in other loaded rounds in your cylinder or magazine to become seated deeper inside their respective cases due to improper case tension.

The simple test to determine whether you have enough case tension on the bullet is to take your reloaded round, note the COL, press the bullet end against a hard surface with significant but not overbearing force, and remeasure COL. There should be no change in the COL measured. If there is, you run the risk of bullet setback and will need to re-examine your reloading procedures (die adjustments).
Jim, in my experience recoil usually pulls the bullets out of the case. Most of the bullet setback I have seen was caused by chambering in an autoloader.

GioaJack
10-27-2010, 22:11
'Setback' normally is a problem in autos while 'bullet creep', (pulling forward out of the case) is an affliction in heavy recoiling revolver rounds.

Neither one is an ideal situation.


Jack

FM12
10-27-2010, 22:57
Squibs. More an annoyance than anything. (Didnt shoot another bullet behind them tho)

fredj338
10-27-2010, 23:01
I have had my share of squibs, good to pay attention at all times while reloading. I have had over loads, not KB, but pound them out fo the rev cyl types. That's what happens when you substitute bullets w/o backing down & reworking your loads.

shotgunred
10-28-2010, 04:41
I used AA#5 in a 40sw with 180 gr. lead swc 20 years ago.:whistling:
It wasn't pretty.

IndyGunFreak
10-28-2010, 04:53
Jack, you had that accident reloading almost EXACTLY 10 years before i was born!!:wow: These ex-wives you speak of are probably old enough to be my grandma:tongueout:

I was born on Feb 1.. but in 1980.. ;)

IGF

ColdShot
10-28-2010, 05:36
Squibs.....Buggers always get stuck in the barrel too

ron59
10-28-2010, 05:50
I've only been reloading for just over a year, but still close to 24,000 rounds.

No accidents, YET. Hope it stays that way.

I've had an upside down primer or two, but I caught them before trying to shoot them (that's why I like loading my ammo nose down in those plastic boxes... you'll catch that sort of thing).

BK63
10-28-2010, 06:01
Luckily in many many years of reloading and many thousands of rounds the worst thing I've had is an under charge that did not function the gun when testing new loads. When I was a kid a very long time ago my father once set his powder measure for 11 grains when he meant to set it for 6 and blew up a 45. I remember that day at the range. Nobody was hurt but it's burned into my brain and the reason why I check and recheck and recheck over and over my powder before and during my loading process all the time. It kind of made me a little paranoid for the rest of my life but I guess it's a good thing to be extra safe.

DoctaGlockta
10-28-2010, 06:16
Squibs.

Paying the gunsmith at the range $25 and waiting a week to remove one said above squib when I didn't know any better.

Thinking I could get a 308 case full length resized with a Lee die.

Not buying a tumbler sooner.

PhantomF4E
10-28-2010, 07:14
I fired an old 30.06 round I loaded back in '85 had a small corrosion spot on it. Never thought twice about it. Problem is it corroded from the inside out and the shell ejected in two pieces. No harm done, and interestingly enough shot on target at 100 yds. But I inspect my oldies better now and also check the insides better when cleaning the rounds. I have no idea what could have done that. Maybe just a flaw in the brass itself.

Giddyupgo55
10-28-2010, 09:32
Three things over the years. First one when I first starting to reload forgot to put powder in half a dozen 30-30 cases.About the same time I was also loading for a 357 mag rifle and a Ruger 357 blackhawk. Two diferent loads with rifle being a lot hotter, and I got 3 rounds mixed in with my pistol rounds. That woke me up real fast when the pistol tried to jump out of my hand. After that it was nickle cases for the rifle and brass for the pistol. The last one was shooting some reloads in my G23 when I had a case blow out on me. These were reload my cousin had put together. I started to take the rest of the ammo apart and found some had lite loads some had what looked liked not a double load but close. A couple didn't even have any powder in them. Only damaged done to the gun was the slide release spring and a sore hand.

El_Ron1
10-28-2010, 13:02
never have your face over a filled primer tube when testing the theory of 'sympathetic detonation'.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss114/GioaJack/IMG_4096.jpg?1288232402

What device was that tube used with?

El_Ron1
10-28-2010, 13:02
I used AA#5 in a 40sw with 180 gr. lead swc 20 years ago.:whistling:
It wasn't pretty.
"FC" brass? :cool:

GioaJack
10-28-2010, 13:08
What device was that tube used with?


One of the original C&H in-line progressives. One of the most useless pieces of loading equipment ever invented but at the time the only other progressive options was Star.

Finally smartened up and bought 2 Stars. The C&H resides in a box in the barn... awaiting a very stiff wind to carry it away to the land of OZ.


Jack

Cheytac
10-28-2010, 13:19
I've always "loaded" properly the 1st time, so I've never had to "re-load."

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:


Carry on...

ruger rcm
10-28-2010, 13:39
Squibs.....Buggers always get stuck in the barrel too




had 2 in the last 2 shooting sessions with different calibers.:steamed:

DoctaGlockta
10-28-2010, 13:59
had 2 in the last 2 shooting sessions with different calibers.:steamed:

As far as reloading faux pas go I wonder how that stacks up to real world ones. Is it like farting in front of someone you just met or is there more shame in it?

fx77
10-28-2010, 15:39
Failed to check the die seating depth before proceeding
All were to short of ideal length
Had to disassemble a lot of rounds

mboylan
10-28-2010, 16:32
YeYIKES:wow: Did you get hurt?

And now for a dumb question....what is "bullet setback"? I've heard the term a million times, but i dont know what it means.


Setback occurs when crimp is not correct and the bullet is forced back into the case during recoil. This causes a pressure spike and sometimes blows up the gun. Too tight a crimp will cause pressure problems as well. Suggest you hit the books.

wrx04
10-28-2010, 16:45
Ye


Setback occurs when crimp is not correct and the bullet is forced back into the case during recoil. This causes a pressure spike and sometimes blows up the gun. Too tight a crimp will cause pressure problems as well. Suggest you hit the books.

Yeah, thats what i thought....and i have read a couple books cover to cover. The reason why i asked the question is because i have heard guys say that if you keep chambering/unchambering the same round (i.e. your defense ammo) it can cause setback. Not sure how that would cause the bullet to get pushed back on a factory (supposedly well made) round. Just wanted to see if it was the same thing.

Thanks for the response.

tac_driver
10-28-2010, 16:46
didn't crimp 45acp LSWC's properly crimped to .471 had bullet setback good thing i was shooting over a chronograph. velocity was 900fps with first round then 240 fps over book velocity (Unique starting load) knew enough to stop shooting and re-evaluate. found problem now crimp to .468 LSWC's. Was Lucky no damage to person or gun.

tjpet
10-28-2010, 17:42
I've never had a problem with reloads and I've been in the game since 1969. However, I did shoot a television with an "unloaded" .44 mag back in 1975.

sdelam
10-28-2010, 18:13
http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m237/sdelam1/IMG_6720.jpg
http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m237/sdelam1/IMG_6739.jpg
http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m237/sdelam1/IMG_6727.jpg

halfmoonclip
10-28-2010, 18:40
Yeah, thats what i thought....and i have read a couple books cover to cover. The reason why i asked the question is because i have heard guys say that if you keep chambering/unchambering the same round (i.e. your defense ammo) it can cause setback. Not sure how that would cause the bullet to get pushed back on a factory (supposedly well made) round. Just wanted to see if it was the same thing.

Thanks for the response.

This was sorted out on Page 1. Setback is indeed caused by chambering an autopistol round; the bullet slams into the feedramp on its way to the chamber. Factory ammo may be more resistant (some GI .45 ammo actually has the rounds doubly held in place with a black, tarry substance), but enough cyclings can get you into trouble. It's a good thing to shoot away and/or rotate your carry rounds. Cops who must routinely and repetitively clear and reload their guns (entering a jail/courthouse) are especially at risk for this.

Most pistols don't allow you to drop a round in the chamber and let the slide slam shut; it will break or chip the extractor, so this isn't a solution.

Bullet creep IS caused by recoil, (actually by inertia; the bullets stay behind to a certain degree while the casing recoils away from them) and the bullets back out of the cartridges.
I have a Smith 340 SC, an 11 oz .357 mag. You fill the cylinder with your chosen carry ammo, and fire four shots; examine (or mike) the fifth looking for bullet creep. I've had rounds back out so far that they tied up the cylinder, and it is necessary to use a Lee Factory Crimp to keep reloads planted.
Moon

GammaDriver
10-28-2010, 18:42
I've never had a problem with reloads and I've been in the game since 1969. However, I did shoot a television with an "unloaded" .44 mag back in 1975.

Wow, and I always thought television programming was better in the 1970's than it is now... I've been planning to shoot my TV for quite a while, but then I just canceled my cable and stopped watching it.

Reloading mess-up: besides one run of about 16 cartridges I didn't put any powder in (I tried, but the powder delivery tool was jammed without me knowing it), I did later have one squib load (no powder, again, but different reloading system), but in the AR platform the bullet actually stays IN THE CASE from a primer-only fire. Turns out the .223 AR-15 seems to be one of the more new-reloader friendly calibers.

halfmoonclip
10-28-2010, 18:52
As far as mistakes, my best was a squib resulting from an effort to make light .45 loads. The squibbed bullet hung in the barrel, but I didn't note the odd report (actually, I did note it, but just didn't do anything about it). I racked another round and fired; THIS time the gun kicked hard and I knew what I had done. Still have the barrel and show it when we do the NRA course at our Club; it looks like a snake that swallowed a mouse.

I've been physically present for two blow-ups; one blew the mag and catch out of a 1911 (the guy misunderstood load data he was given orally); the other grenaded a Smith J-frame .38. The cylinder was in three pieces (one went thru' the ceiling of our indoor range), but everything blew up and forward away from the shooter; good design work on S&W's part. Smith wanted to see it, and sold the guy a replacement at cost. They said a double charge would not have blown it up, and a triple wouldn't fit, so it remains a mystery.

Another buddy (who smoked while loading, as I once did) managed to spark off the contents of his powder measure, scaring hell out of him and taking out the ceiling light.

Let's be careful out there...
Moon

GioaJack
10-28-2010, 19:05
This was sorted out on Page 1. Setback is indeed caused by chambering an autopistol round; the bullet slams into the feedramp on its way to the chamber. Factory ammo may be more resistant (some GI .45 ammo actually has the rounds doubly held in place with a black, tarry substance), but enough cyclings can get you into trouble. It's a good thing to shoot away and/or rotate your carry rounds. Cops who must routinely and repetitively clear and reload their guns (entering a jail/courthouse) are especially at risk for this.

Most pistols don't allow you to drop a round in the chamber and let the slide slam shut; it will break or chip the extractor, so this isn't a solution.

Bullet creep IS caused by recoil, (actually by inertia; the bullets stay behind to a certain degree while the casing recoils away from them) and the bullets back out of the cartridges.
I have a Smith 340 SC, an 11 oz .357 mag. You fill the cylinder with your chosen carry ammo, and fire four shots; examine (or mike) the fifth looking for bullet creep. I've had rounds back out so far that they tied up the cylinder, and it is necessary to use a Lee Factory Crimp to keep reloads planted.
Moon


I'm wondering how people managed to load revolver rounds prior to the introduction of the Lee Crimp Die. :dunno:


Jack

Bob2223
10-28-2010, 19:14
I was waiting on comment about the FCD and also crimping holding a bullet, I started typing then :zipmouth:


Bob :supergrin:

WiskyT
10-28-2010, 19:36
When I first updated my Lee autodisk I had the pull back chain installed wrong. It got just enough slack in it to not quite cycle fully. I didn't notice until I had loaded about 150 rounds. So, not having a bullet puller and being generally lazy, I shot them off. I had about 10 rounds that didn't make it out of the barrel. It was kind of silly hearing the reports ranging from normal, to pfft and seing the bullet go downrange, to pewt and having to pound out the lead bullets.

Now I check the operation of the measure every time I rotate to a new case feeder tube and empty the cup of 15 or so loaded rounds. This way if I find a problem, I won't have more than 15 screwups. I never had a problem since that one time.

I had a FC 40SW case blow out on my G27. Mag was ejected but fine. Mag catch was fine. Ejector went to the other side of the indoor range. I found it and with my MacGiver ball point Glock reassembly pen was back in action in about 5 minutes. I now check all 40SW brass for FC.

I have a non-reloading ammusing anecdote. I found a 12 gauge shell that had been cut open and the "contents" removed. So I figured I'd pop the primer on it when I got home. I was a kid and my parents weren't home and I just had the itch. So I pointed it and my bed and expected a primer only "pop". Well, what I didn't realize was that the wad and powder were still in it. So what I got was a "bang" and the wad went about 6" into the mattress. The wool blanket on top had a miniature camp fire going on it too. So I put it out, hid the blanket, and flipped the mattress. Dad never found out.

halfmoonclip
10-28-2010, 20:13
I'm wondering how people managed to load revolver rounds prior to the introduction of the Lee Crimp Die. :dunno:


Jack

Never found it necessary for anything else, even WOT .44 mag loads.
But with the flyweight .357, nothing else will touch it. When you need it, you need it. I suspect it's hard on brass, but those magnums don't get reloaded a lot.

A tight resizing die will also hold bullets in place, but it wasn't near enough in the little Smith.
Moon

GioaJack
10-28-2010, 20:24
I guess everyone loads a little different, if that's what works for you there's probably no reason to change.


Jack

halfmoonclip
10-28-2010, 20:30
I guess everyone loads a little different, if that's what works for you there's probably no reason to change.


Jack

I'm of an age that I don't want to change a damn thing...:supergrin:
Actually, I prefer to taper crimp everything, as it's more forgiving of variations in case length and doesn't work the brass as much. With lead bullets I'll use a roll crimp, and I chrono everything. If there is too much variation, it's time to think about tightening the grip on the bullet.
This is an interesting thread; my big thing is not to multitask when loading; no bull****ting on the phone, no TV in the shop. With a progressive press, focus is job one.
Moon

ilgunguygt
10-28-2010, 22:30
Ye


Setback occurs when crimp is not correct and the bullet is forced back into the case during recoil. This causes a pressure spike and sometimes blows up the gun. Too tight a crimp will cause pressure problems as well. Suggest you hit the books.
No, it isnt. Bullet setback occurs upon chambering in an auto-loader. Bullet creep is caused by recoil.

cole
10-28-2010, 23:56
Loaded 500+ rounds for my 1911 then decided to use 'em in my Glock. The OAL was too long for the LWD barrel. Fun times using a progressive like a single stage.

jeanjvr
10-29-2010, 00:56
First day with first batch of reloads in 9x19:

1. Did not size correctly so some cases did not feed.
2. Weak loads did not cycle properly (don't want to blow up a G17 on the first day now)
3. My first squib. Noticed it right away, got it out and continued to struggle through problems 1 and 2 :D
4. Loading 100 of these damned fail rounds!

After this fiasco, not one reloading problem so far.

Rico567
10-29-2010, 05:23
In over 40 years of reloading, most of my issues have been too minor to mention. OTOH, I'm....pretty careful.

Last year I discovered what -as far as I can recall- was my worst mistake. What's worse, I can't even remember how it happened. I was going to shoot some .38s, and found a ziploc bag with about 50-60 rounds of lead bullet reloads in the back of the cabinet.....no label. It's been a number of years since I switched to plated bullets, so there was no question that these were old. When I went out an started shooting them, somewhere through the first cylinder, click, nothing, and the cylinder hung. Didn't take long to figure out that I was dealing with primer-only, just pushed the bullet far enough to jam into the forcing cone and bind the cylinder. I tapped the bullet back into the cylinder with a cleaning rod and weighed out the remaining rounds. About half, twenty-odd, had no, or virtually no powder in them. Undoubtedly a powder measure problem, but one that somehow was confined to only these reloads. Mystifying, too, because I normally load in much larger batches, and yet have never had this problem before.

Anyhoo, I pulled the low-weight bullets and fired the rest; the mystery remains.

saltydog452
10-29-2010, 08:11
I misread the counter weight on a balance beam powder scale.

What I was trying to do was get 'Elmer's Load' in .44 Spcl. What I got was not 17.5 gn 2400, but 22.5. I weighed every charge but I was looking at the 'swing' on the arm of the balance beam, not the counterweight.

I was using older baloon head cases. Maybe the extra case capacity helped prevent an 'unintended disassembly'.

The M 24 Smith held together OK. Sure did smart in the hand 'tho.

salty

ColCol
10-29-2010, 11:15
Back in 1969(before most were born here) I had just begun reloading for rifles, no pistols then. I was reloading for the 270 Winchester and wasn't sure how many times I could reload a particular batch of cases. I noticed no primer problems or other signs of pressure so I continued.

After about(memory is dusty now) 6-8 reloads I was shooting from a bench at the outdoor range and lifted the bolt to extract the spent round and all I got was a case head rim-the rest of the case was stuck inside the chamber.

Cause of this? An incipient case head separation due to head space problem, according to the gunsmith that removed the case. He turned the barrel in a little, rechecked using go-no go gauges I believe and that solved the problem. I was told to always check for an impending problem by taking a paper clip, bending one end into a small hook and running it down inside the case till it stopped and drag it slowly up to see if there was a snag which may indicate the beginning of a pressure ring that could cause a weakness and hence, another case head separation. This, just for good insurance as I wasn't using a max load (59 gr of H-4831 and 130 gr Speer bullet).

Had I not been using a rifle with the good ol' 98 Mauser action, I cold have gotten a face full of brass and powder.

halfmoonclip
10-29-2010, 11:37
A 'bright ring' is sometimes an indicator of a case that is getting stretched. I don't reload much bottleneck stuff; Elijah, could you have solved the problem by backing off on the resizing die, as long as you kept the reloads to your gun?

Another piece of good reloading advice that an old buddy gave to me..."One can of powder on the bench at a time, no exceptions...."

Moon

Homechicken
10-29-2010, 11:47
Loaded a .38 Spl squib once when I was 10 or 11 years old. My dad was supervising me, but it sneaked through anyway. Shortened the trip to the range as the S&W K38 was all we took that day and it happened around the tenth shot.

GioaJack
10-29-2010, 12:11
A 'bright ring' is sometimes an indicator of a case that is getting stretched. I don't reload much bottleneck stuff; Elijah, could you have solved the problem by backing off on the resizing die, as long as you kept the reloads to your gun?

Another piece of good reloading advice that an old buddy gave to me..."One can of powder on the bench at a time, no exceptions...."

Moon


Halfmoon give good advice here. Like Fred, I have more containers of different powders lying around than Carter has Little Liver Pills. For more years than I can remember I've always kept the container of powder I'm using on the bench right behind the press and then put a sticky label on the front of the powder measure with the bullet weight I'm loading, type of powder and charge.

I prefer the sticky labels because I never empty my hoppers unless I'm actually changing powder so I don't have to worry about them falling off. The hopper will fit five or six labels so when I alter the charge I just scratch out the old one and write up a new one. When I run out of room I simply use a little alcohol to remove all the labels and start over.

With 7 active presses at any one time things could get confusing and potentially dangerous so although it may not be the best system in the world it works for me.


Jack

FLSlim
10-29-2010, 12:52
My main mistake has been not reloading/shooting enough!!! Other than that, in my early years of reloading I missed charging a 44 mag case. It was an easy catch (not much recoil, my friend), had to drive the bullet out of the barrel, and made me forever aware that I need to stay alert when dumping powder!

halfmoonclip
10-29-2010, 13:49
Powder charging is always what makes me twitchy. I did misread the vernier on my RCBS scale once; the resulting loads were still safe, but heavier than I really wanted.
Since then, I've tried to fail-safe the powder measure on the 550. I made a little gizmo out of a .45 case and a piece of all-thread that makes a wrench on the powder adjustment bolt. I carefully record the number of turns needed to achieve a certain weight in my loading data page, along with the charge bar size. This lets me get back to 'pretty close' setting the charge bar when changing loads, and if there is a big discrepancy between the two, either the press is wrong or the scale is wrong, and I start checking.

Love a progressive press and the economy of your own loads, but you do have to be careful.
Moon

hoffy
10-29-2010, 14:24
Ah, the old CH in lines, I workred in a gun shop years ago and developed a reputation for getting them running, problem was it never lasted, Then RCBS bought the rights and called it the Green Machine, lasted a couple of years. I too have a Star, wonderful machines/RIP. My biggest boo boo was grabbed some 41 cal 210 grainers off the shelf and had dropped loads for 170s. Knew it first time I pulled trigger(mod 57 smith), very hot, but primers weren't flattened, and extraction was ok, so I sent 50 down range.

A buddy had a mass detonation with a Lee auto prime-blew it to bits, oh, I had a primer go off in a 45 whilst priming it in an RCBS auto prime bench mounted tool. My fault, the pockets needed cleaned badly. Fire shot out about 2-3 inches.

I use tons of ziplocs and lots of notes, I load a lot, then don't for weeks, just cant remember that much stuff. I keep records in bound composition books, a holdover from chem labs at university.

ColCol
10-29-2010, 14:35
A 'bright ring' is sometimes an indicator of a case that is getting stretched. I don't reload much bottleneck stuff; Elijah, could you have solved the problem by backing off on the resizing die, as long as you kept the reloads to your gun?

Another piece of good reloading advice that an old buddy gave to me..."One can of powder on the bench at a time, no exceptions...."

Moon

I didn't know what to look for back then at the innocent age of 23. I was told by that gunsmith about the somewhat shinny ring and to smoke the shouldn't of the cartridge and back off on the die until it just made contact with the shoulder. He said part of the problem was RCBS always recommendation screwing the sizer down too far, setting the shoulder back. We live and learn. I haven't reloaded for rifles in probably 20 years now. My last rifle shooting was with a .58 cal Zouave. Now it's mostly pistols. That particular .270 was gone long ago.

I never have more than one type of primer and powder on the bench at one time. Parallax error in looking at a beam scale can cause an erroneous read of the scale as well. I "hunker down" a little to eliminate that as I stand while reloading.

Bello
10-29-2010, 14:55
First day with first batch of reloads in 9x19:

1. Did not size correctly so some cases did not feed.
2. Weak loads did not cycle properly (don't want to blow up a G17 on the first day now)
3. My first squib. Noticed it right away, got it out and continued to struggle through problems 1 and 2 :D
4. Loading 100 of these damned fail rounds!

After this fiasco, not one reloading problem so far.

That's just a :rofl:

fredj338
10-29-2010, 16:03
No, it isnt. Bullet setback occurs upon chambering in an auto-loader. Bullet creep is caused by recoil.
Actually setback is caused by loss of neck tension. It does occur when a round is being chambered but the cause is loss of neck tension. If your loads have proper neck tension, bullet setback is almost nil. I have seen guys testing 15-20 chamberings w/ no appreciable setback w/ most calibers. Some are more prone to setback than others (357sig), but it doesn't happen w/ every caliber, every chambering in every style of pistol.

wanderinwalker
10-29-2010, 17:00
Reloading boo-boos:

Squib with a 9mm when I first started reloading on a progressive. Cut the range visit short and I learned how to pound a bullet out of a Glock barrel.

Reloads too long with XTP bullets in 9mm. Luckily I did this with a dummy round first and found the OAL was too long. Had to use the dowel and hammer on that one too. (I think this might have been before the progressive.)

Not enough powder in the cartridge in .223. This was good, as it was with an 80gr 600-yard load, found at a practice for the state team. The team coach asked me sternly "That's not the ammo you're taking to Perry is it?" I haven't loaded .223 on a progressive since.

A few times loading cases and then finding they split somewhere in the process. Makes me roll my eyes as I set them in the "disassemble" pile.

Loading up a bunch of 80gr .223 loads for my AR-15, then changing the barrel.

Not sure if this one is a reloading goof, but I once accidentally purchased 1000 CCI-BR2s when I intended to grab BR4s for small rifle. Luckily my old .260 liked them anyway.

And lots of upside-down and side-ways primers from my precious Pro-1000.

ilgunguygt
10-29-2010, 18:04
Actually setback is caused by loss of neck tension. It does occur when a round is being chambered but the cause is loss of neck tension. If your loads have proper neck tension, bullet setback is almost nil. I have seen guys testing 15-20 chamberings w/ no appreciable setback w/ most calibers. Some are more prone to setback than others (357sig), but it doesn't happen w/ every caliber, every chambering in every style of pistol.
I wasnt debating that, fred, in fact I found that rather obvious. I was simply pointing out that the poster had those a little backwards.

PhantomF4E
10-29-2010, 20:07
Looks like what it boils down to is we all have to be a little OCD, clean, measure , weigh, visual inspection, mechanical inspection...... The whole lather , rinse, repeat deal on the bottle of your wife's shampoo..... Or your EX-wifes shampoo... LOL. Her effect is really clean hair, even if shes blonde and runs the bottle out and can't figure how to repeat again.. Ours is pounding copper and lead out of a barrel. Or picking up the barrel before the trip to the ER.. OCD rules !!!!!

kelevra
10-30-2010, 02:01
I'm green to reloading and managed to spill my powder measure twice and 2lbs of powder on seperate occasions. Lubed my .308 brass, wiped them clean and then ran them through the sizing die...cussing about the lube and after eight casings I finally figured it out. Don't watch TV and load!
No squibs or fractured casings yet...sounds scary as hell though.
What do I need to look for in case buldging and are squibs from underloading the powder?

Rico567
10-30-2010, 11:17
<snip> Don't watch TV and load!
<snip>

Good advice. I not only shoot and reload, but also homebrew.
My first rule of brewing: no drinking until the brewing is over. Just like cell phones in cars, etc. Distraction is the enemy where attention is the point.

DWARREN123
10-30-2010, 14:34
Light charge and I hope it is the worst I have.! :embarassed:

njl
10-30-2010, 17:27
Loaded 500+ rounds for my 1911 then decided to use 'em in my Glock. The OAL was too long for the LWD barrel. Fun times using a progressive like a single stage.

Running them back through the seater die to shorten them?

My only real accidents/mistakes so far have been:

1) shooting one of the screen support rods on my chrony (just a flesh wound...didn't kill it)
2) buying a Lyman X1000P digital scale (doesn't hold zero)
3) buying a digital caliper and not buying a spare battery when the first battery died...solved that buy buying new batteries and a dial caliper as a backup

BTW...when loading small test lots of ammo (different powders or charges), I put the test lots in ziplock bags marked with sharpie as to what's in them. I'd have to drop and dump the contents of multiple bags to mix things up.

bradbury
10-30-2010, 17:40
my worst mistake was not getting into reloading years ago when the component prices were sooooo low...

halfmoonclip
10-30-2010, 21:29
Parallax error in looking at a beam scale can cause an erroneous read of the scale as well. I "hunker down" a little to eliminate that as I stand while reloading.

I solve this problem by mounting my scale at eye level and off the bench; it saves the scale from bench vibrations as well.
Moon

dudel
10-31-2010, 05:30
No problems with ammo (knock, knock). Equipment wise, I've made a number of mistakes, all rectifiable. RCBS Green Machine. Lee P1K, LCT and Challenger presses. Lee Perfect Powder Measure. Lee trimmers. Hornady Pro-Jector. The Lee stuff worked (sorta, kinda); I just didn't know better (I cheaped out). The RCBS GM on the other hand; flat did not work. The Pro-Jector was just released on a unsuspecting public before all the glitches were worked out.

Mistake that I regret, was selling the Marlin Camp Carbine in 9mm. That one is a bit harder to rectify.

halfmoonclip
10-31-2010, 07:05
More than 25 years ago, a late buddy of mine showed up at my door with a ****-eating grin on his face and an add for a Dillon press in his hands. He'd done some reloading on my single stage equipment, and hated the drudgery.
We were both primarily handgunners, and needed the ability to generate a lot of ammo.
We jointly bought that press, and it's still on my bench after three overhauls and a bazillion rounds of ammo. Looking back, it was a gamble that worked out, especially after hearing about other progressive presses that have been troublesome.
The Dillon has had its quirks, but the company has stood behind it with its 'NO BS' warranty. Big Blue is the way to go.
Moon

sdelam
10-31-2010, 09:17
I guess I'm the only one dumb enough to have a list of mistakes, or at least admit to having a list..

Where to start, where to start?
I guess I could say most of my mistakes where within the last few years, since I got my LNL. Not that they were the press' fault, more that it was so easy to mutiply any mistake by producing large batches.

1. The first round I started with on the LNL was 9mm. I had about 3k 115g montana golds and I wanted to load them. I found a light load that was just hot enough to work the slide on my G19 and went to town. After they where all loaded, I found that I had a lot of high primer issues and although the load was strong enough to make the gun function, it dosnt always lock the action back (pain in comp's).

2. My next effort was .45. I bought a 230g Lee mold and begain punching out bullets. Found a load that worked and went with it. After about 1500 rounds loaded I discovered that I was over crimping and these loads leaded the barrel in my 1911, BAD. And that they didnt work worth a darn in my g36.

3. The pinicle of my reloading mishaps was the destruction of the g36 posted earlier. Still not sure what happened. I was tring to work out feeding problems with lead bullets using a 228g lyman mold and was going to town on the last 5 rounds of a 50 round box. I had no issues up to that point. light load of BE, no pressure signs, if anything they were to a bit too light from the soot ring on the case mouth. It dosnt appear to be a out of battery thing from the way the case was in the barrel. A bad piece of range pick up brass maybe?

firecracker6
10-31-2010, 10:19
Bullet setback is when the bullet gets pushed deeper into the case than it was when you loaded it. This is often caused by the bullets hitting the feed ramp as the round is pushed forward by the slide. The worst mistake I ever made was to forget to put powder in the case. I had just gotten my first progressive press and was being very careful to weigh my charges often (since I was new to the equipment). Unfortunately I forgot to dump the powder back into the case when I was done weighing it. Nothing that bad happened but I had to endure the embarrassment of borrowing a rod to tap the bullet out of the barrel. Very lucky.

sdelam
10-31-2010, 10:33
Bullet setback is when the bullet gets pushed deeper into the case than it was when you loaded it. This is often caused by the bullets hitting the feed ramp as the round is pushed forward by the slide. The worst mistake I ever made was to forget to put powder in the case. I had just gotten my first progressive press and was being very careful to weigh my charges often (since I was new to the equipment). Unfortunately I forgot to dump the powder back into the case when I was done weighing it. Nothing that bad happened but I had to endure the embarrassment of borrowing a rod to tap the bullet out of the barrel. Very lucky.

That reminds me...The only mistake I made on a single stage press. I somehow forgot powder in a few .38's one time. The primers wernt quite enough to push it out the barrel.