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emt1581
10-31-2010, 20:51
First off I'm in no way suggesting anyone impersonate a cop. But you have to admit, a cop's duty belt is a pretty efficient way to carry a good amount of weapons/tools from gun, mags, light, batteries, knife/multi-tool, phone, first aid/meds, etc. Plus you can wear them over top of another belt/shirt/etc.

Anyone have a duty belt packed as part of your preps? Is it a bad/inefficient idea for any reason?

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks!

-Emt1581

ChuteTheMall
10-31-2010, 20:55
That's just downright silly, and even worse than a fanny pack.

At least a fanny pack is an efficient load carrying device, but it too falls way short of anything with a shoulder strap, whether it's your mom's purse or a daypack.

It would only look cool with a CCW badge on it.:okie:

emt1581
10-31-2010, 20:57
That's just downright silly, and even worse than a fanny pack.

At least a fanny pack is an efficient load carrying device, but it too falls way short of anything with a shoulder strap, whether it's your mom's purse or a daypack.

It would only look cool with a CCW badge on it.:okie:

I wasn't talking about it for carrying supplies around, just weapons/tools. It provides quick access and seems efficient enough for LE to use it. :dunno:

-Emt1581

Nest
10-31-2010, 21:22
I think a load bearing vest, or even the old belt and suspenders the military used to use. Not sure if they still do with the vest these days. But you can load up a war belt with enough ammo and weapons to carry far more than a police duty belt. All of the pouches they make can be used for everything. They make ammo pouches, first aid kits, and the butt packs can hold a lot of gear. You can carry 2-3 days worth of supplies and more ammo than you can shoot before getting shot yourself on one of these belts.

Goldendog Redux
10-31-2010, 21:25
First off I'm in no way suggesting anyone impersonate a cop. But you have to admit, a cop's duty belt is a pretty efficient way to carry a good amount of weapons/tools from gun, mags, light, batteries, knife/multi-tool, phone, first aid/meds, etc. Plus you can wear them over top of another belt/shirt/etc.

Anyone have a duty belt packed as part of your preps? Is it a bad/inefficient idea for any reason?

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks!

-Emt1581


Wear that sucker around for a while and you will have your answer. Don't forget to wear your keepers.

emt1581
10-31-2010, 21:35
Wear that sucker around for a while and you will have your answer. Don't forget to wear your keepers.

I've seen several used in conjunction with suspenders if that's what you're talking about.

If not, please elaborate more.

Thanks!

-Emt1581

FireForged
10-31-2010, 21:51
Its just a belt... I dont really get the question. Carry stuff on a belt? sure... Carry lots of stuff on a belt? probably not. Loading your waist up with 25lbs gear is not the best idea in the world if there are other options.

Goldendog Redux
10-31-2010, 22:16
I've seen several used in conjunction with suspenders if that's what you're talking about.

If not, please elaborate more.

Thanks!

-Emt1581

Loaded duty belts are not particularly fun to wear. I can run around and jump over stuff with relative ease. I feel like complete tard trying to do that wearing a duty belt. A load bearing vest is better for your application. I would run a pistol on the vest instead of a belt/thigh rig.

MF

South Fla
10-31-2010, 22:46
First off I'm in no way suggesting anyone impersonate a cop. But you have to admit, a cop's duty belt is a pretty efficient way to carry a good amount of weapons/tools from gun, mags, light, batteries, knife/multi-tool, phone, first aid/meds, etc. Plus you can wear them over top of another belt/shirt/etc.

Anyone have a duty belt packed as part of your preps? Is it a bad/inefficient idea for any reason?

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks!

-Emt1581

This reeks of Mall Ninja.

lawman800
10-31-2010, 23:31
Its just a belt... I dont really get the question. Carry stuff on a belt? sure... Carry lots of stuff on a belt? probably not. Loading your waist up with 25lbs gear is not the best idea in the world if there are other options.

My nylon duty belt weighs about 12 pounds fully loaded with a sidearm, 2 mags, flashlight, baton, and other miscellaneous items. Would I wear it when SHTF? Probably.

But then again, I am used to it and I know where everything is and it's second nature to me. I personally prefer a LBE type vest for a setup. Try sitting for an extended period of time or manuevering in tight quarters and the shortcomings of a full duty belt will become quite apparent.

kirgi08
10-31-2010, 23:42
Diversify your load,as stated, a duty belt is a pita if you havta move around a lot.'08.

kirgi08
10-31-2010, 23:50
My nylon duty belt weighs about 12 pounds fully loaded with a sidearm, 2 mags, flashlight, baton, and other miscellaneous items. Would I wear it when SHTF? Probably.

But then again, I am used to it and I know where everything is and it's second nature to me. I personally prefer a LBE type vest for a setup. Try sitting for an extended period of time or manuevering in tight quarters and the shortcomings of a full duty belt will become quite apparent.

When I'm at work my belt/eagle/ carries a G23/loaded 13+1
w-2 15rndmags a Asp/surefire/multi tool.I'm usta the weight and have learned how ta "move" wearing this set-up.Until I learned "how" ta move wearing it,I beat the heck outta my gear.'08. :upeyes:

Stevekozak
11-01-2010, 05:42
First off I'm in no way suggesting anyone impersonate a cop. But you have to admit, a cop's duty belt is a pretty efficient way to carry a good amount of weapons/tools from gun, mags, light, batteries, knife/multi-tool, phone, first aid/meds, etc. Plus you can wear them over top of another belt/shirt/etc.

Anyone have a duty belt packed as part of your preps? Is it a bad/inefficient idea for any reason?

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks!

-Emt1581
I think a load bearing vest would be a much more efficent tool for this application. All that weight just on a belt would not be a good thing for long. Ask any cop that has to wear one with just what they have. LBV not a bad idea for a prep though.

Stevekozak
11-01-2010, 05:44
This reeks of Mall Ninja.
EMT is not a mall ninja, he just has a lot of ideas running around in his head all the time. Sparks a lot of good discussion here. I don't think he is talking about actually wearing the belt around all the time, but rather having something like it packed and ready for a SHTF situation (whatever that might be).

bdcochran
11-01-2010, 07:38
I am going to give EMT the benefit of the doubt.

The newspaper reporter writes saying: who, what, when where, why and how.

Concepts: 1. carrying gear;
2. where to carry gear;
3. when to carry gear.

One size does not fit all.

You have to have an objective and situation. Police belt carry suggests that you want to have items available and not in your hand. Ok. Go back to the questions. Then you find out what everyone concludes. There isn't one answer.

If the next question is "why shouldn't I buy South African surplus 3 day pack", my response is the same.

If the third question is "why shouldn't I modernize and wear a hydration bladder rather than carry a WWII canteen on a pistol belt", my response is the same..

EMT- Suppose you asked the question about the police pistol belt when you were in school. Ask the same question when you are 65. Ask whether your wife should wear a police pistol belt too. How about any kids that may come along? Do they wear pistol belts? My kid had his own gear when he was 11 years old and this included a government .45 acp pistol. Conversely, there are a number of adults that I would never trust around me with a knife and spoon.

How about boots. Yeah, everyone wants to own the meanest, baddest army boots available. Yet, when I did the Golden Triangle in the 1970s, I deliberately wore sneakers because I estimated that I would be lifting each foot thousands of times a day in mud.

Ok. So you go out and buy the police pistol belt, police holster and surplus police gear on line. Next, go roll on the ground while wearing it. Then walk around all day with it on. Run a mile wearing it. Take out the trash. Bend over in the garden and pick the vegetables.

I am not making fun. I am asking you to think about your answer, not someone else's answer.

I have a dear friend and full time shooting instructor. He doesn't believe in upper thigh carry holsters. I am the opposite.. I carried the military pistol belt set up and don't want to do so when shtf, based solely on my experience. When I look at surplus police gear, it is generally too heavy, too bulky, and not responsive to what I want to do.

why
11-01-2010, 08:35
bdc nails it again. whatever flavor you like, TRY IT now and see how well it actually works.

quake
11-01-2010, 08:51
+1 a lot of the responses here, including bdcochran's. My duty belt would work, but wouldn't be my first choice; and that's with it already here, configured, and broken in. Besides the other comfort & convenience issues mentioned above, I can't see how one could possibly wear a pack with it.

Nine Shooter
11-01-2010, 09:54
My belt is the last thing I'd be wearing unless I was already on duty. Vest with thigh rig would be my ideal setup and probably a small backpack.

Usingmyrights
11-01-2010, 09:59
Having worn duty belts for a living before, I can say its not what you think. They're not that comfortable, and will slow you down if you have to run, or move through tight spaces. I 2nd the vest as a better option

RichJ
11-01-2010, 10:15
Why do they force LEO's to wear them if they are so inefficient?

I think having a flashlight, extra mag, knife, sidearm and maybe even a multitool on your belt would be a good thing to have handy.

volsbear
11-01-2010, 10:34
Why do they force LEO's to wear them if they are so inefficient?

I think having a flashlight, extra mag, knife, sidearm and maybe even a multitool on your belt would be a good thing to have handy.

Because the "professional" appearance of most police departments would prohibit the use of a load bearing vest. Conversely, the traditional duty belt keeps everything nice, tidy and shiney. Also, the vests can be unsightly and enhance critiques about the "militarization" of the police. Finally, police departments are both blessed and cursed with traditions. Some good, some bad. The traditional duty belt is one of them.

I'm a big guy to begin with and a full duty belt makes me bigger, less stealthy, and far less agile. The vest allows you to carry more weight while staying far more agile. Additionally, the vest also places the weight more appropriately on your shoulders rather than on your lower lumbar which is terrible for your back.

There's a reason that most tactical units are using some version of a load bearing vest - because when you need to run, and jump, and wiggle around the vest is just BETTER. Moreover, duty belts by proxy result in a lot of your equipment on your sides or even on your back, so now your hands are no longer in front of you while you're retrieving equipment which can slow your response to a stimulus. The vests keep the most frequently used equipment up front. Consequently, your hands are always in front of you where they're useful. Or watch that Border Patrol TV show and you'll see the guys who are hiking around for hours in the dessert or woods are wearing vests. The stuff just works better. I have a 5.11 loaded up for SHTF.

Usingmyrights
11-01-2010, 10:39
Why do they force LEO's to wear them if they are so inefficient?

I think having a flashlight, extra mag, knife, sidearm and maybe even a multitool on your belt would be a good thing to have handy.

Because it looks better, and most aren't going to have to be very active in them for long periods of time like someone in a SHTF situation. Why do you think alot of the more elite LE groups use vests?

NIB
11-01-2010, 11:59
Out of sight, out of mind!

A duty belt with gear can bring unwanted attention from the good guys and the bad guys. Not to mention the added bulk and weight.

Bilbo Bagins
11-01-2010, 12:20
I think LBV and carrying a vest mounted pistol like a Nutnfancy is just plain silly for anything other than a full blown collapse of society or ETOW event. If you are going to war, fine go gettum, but if the SHTF I think most of us will just be packing pistols and a few mags and being low keyed or concealed. I was in LE most of the stuff I carried on my duty belt I would not need as a civilian when the SHTF. I don't need to carry a radio, handcuffs, a baton, etc. I probably will only carry a Glock, two to four extra mags, a small flashlight (fenix LD20), a knife, maybe some zip ties, and a blowout kit. I think most of us can pull that off with just use a good belt and cargo pants, with maybe suspenders if you need them.

I think EMT's idea has merit, but I would not consider a full blown police duty belt. Think more like EDC, either open or concealed, with just a little more oomph.

volsbear
11-01-2010, 12:34
I definitely agree that the major advantage to some variation of the duty belt is the ability to conceal it.

Bravo 1
11-01-2010, 13:46
I would like to add,,,,,,

a quality belt is probably something many won't consider seriously. Although they probably have gear that attaches to one.

I prefer the Blackhawk riggers belt, or similar style.

South Fla
11-01-2010, 17:27
EMT is not a mall ninja, he just has a lot of ideas running around in his head all the time. Sparks a lot of good discussion here. I don't think he is talking about actually wearing the belt around all the time, but rather having something like it packed and ready for a SHTF situation (whatever that might be).

OK then,a utility belt like Batman wears.

bdcochran
11-02-2010, 07:16
Another, different response.

For years, I went through the agony of questions like

what is the best holster
what is the best scope
what is the best water purifier

Unfortunately, sometimes there is no subsitute for making mistakes This comes about because your situation changes, your scenario changes, or you learn more.

Have I bought surplus police holsters? Oh yeah. It is not a matter of what works for me, it is a matter of what works for you. It was hard accepting that sometimes I had to make a committment on equipment on the learning curve. The money isn't wasted if you learn what works for you.

At some point, you ease off buying equipment and spend the money on obtaining skills. Can you mantrack? Can you shoot accurately while walking? Can you do CPR? Those skills require time and money. Did I like giving up two days of my time and spending $65 to be recertified in CPR? Heck no! However, I wanted to get some experience with a defibulator. Have I liked allocating a couple days, $300, the driving time to the range and several hundred rounds of ammunition in classes? No. However, I can now shoot a Glock 300 yards, run and shoot and reload while running.

It is a lot of fun to compare a Glock with a Government .45acp pistol A good shooter can make do with either. Choosing one over the other isn't important to person who cannot shoot. Spend the money on skills.

Took a class with an instructor who had all of his equipment provided by the Marine Corp. He now wanted to make his own sniper rilfe with a surplus Mauser. He went into shock when the experienced people informed him that he would have to pay nearly double the price for the optics. I assume after he built his rifle, he looked around and learned that shooting a semiauto rifle (modern ones are as accurate as bolt action rifles) was better for follow up shots. So he spent money and time setting up something less than the best given his skills.

What do you do with your "mistakes". A client sells my "mistakes" at gun shows. Do I "get my money back"? Absolutely not! I have boxes of mistakes. Today, I am identifying and getting rid of more mistakes. Note: Salvation Army I will be at your location today.

Let me leave you with a story. A guy named Clark was the President of our club. We had shooters show up with scopes on their government .45s at competitions back in the 1970s. The hotshots laughed when he insisted practising and competing with his 6 inch 38 special. He wasn't cheap, just working with what he carried every day. One day, there was a hostage situation outside the Foothill Division. The perp had his arm around the wife's neck and apparently was pointing a pistol at her head. Dave did one head shot on the guy - and then retired.

EMT - in your daily job (which is dangerous), you have a routine and you practice. Don't hesitate to make mistakes, box up the mistakes like surplus police holsters, get rid of the boxes, and go up your learning curve while working with what you have.

W.E.G.
11-02-2010, 07:26
So long as you keep your grip-screws tight, and don't let your ammo turn green, I don't see a problem with it.

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/humor/mayberry/asabreely-8.jpg

Usingmyrights
11-02-2010, 10:36
I guess some of those using the term duty belt, are actually referring to just carrying some of their regular stuff on a decent belt thats just strong enough to support it. When I think of a duty belt, I'm thinking about the type of setup that LEO actually use, and thats by no means concealable.

MStarmer
11-02-2010, 14:09
I would nix the duty belt idea. It's not comfortable, nor concealable. If I had a choice of something else I would pick a vest. Duty belts are hard on your back (thank god for suspenders), make it cumbersome in tight places (vehicles) and you are limited to "Duty" type 2+" gear to go on them.

ArmoryDoc
11-02-2010, 23:44
I wear a duty bealt every day for work. It is an option for "light gear" to keep from loading your pockets. A belt, coupled with a LBV is a good option. If you've ever worn a thigh rig and tried running and jumping in and out of a vehicle, you'll quickly see the downside to these. I prefer a hip holster for mobility and a gear belt makes that possible. The LBV supplements the belt.

lawman800
11-03-2010, 00:12
I have duty getups with thigh rigs and belt rigs. I prefer the thigh rig because I am naturally inclined to low draws instead of a high draw. My belt rig is the -5 model Safariland with an additional 1.5" drop.

GammaDriver
11-03-2010, 00:22
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/53/Utility-belt.jpg/250px-Utility-belt.jpg

I see where the OP is headed with this idea...

ZombieKing
11-03-2010, 08:23
Wear that sucker around for a while and you will have your answer. Don't forget to wear your keepers.

+1000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

I'm a big guy to begin with and a full duty belt makes me bigger, less stealthy, and far less agile.

Same here.

Duty belts can't be concealed. Unless you're wearing a moo-moo dress. :supergrin:

Plus it can make it damn difficult to sit in chairs with arms. Especially smaller chairs.

cyrsequipment
11-03-2010, 14:39
I wear a duty bealt every day for work. It is an option for "light gear" to keep from loading your pockets. A belt, coupled with a LBV is a good option. If you've ever worn a thigh rig and tried running and jumping in and out of a vehicle, you'll quickly see the downside to these. I prefer a hip holster for mobility and a gear belt makes that possible. The LBV supplements the belt.

Exactly, Thigh rigs are horrible to use. The only way to keep them from flapping around is to either bolt them directly to your femur or tighten them to the thigh that you have no blood flow to your leg at all.
Vests aren't much better for carrying a pistol, but I think they are a little better. Duty belts can't be concealed at all. and they ain't too comfortable, but I've always found them convenient. If you wear them right they don't shift and everything is exactly where you left it so it makes it easier to get stuff quickly.
Ideally, I would recommend a belt rig (regular belt, not a duty belt) for the gun, and strap the rest of the stuff either to a vest because it would be less bulky, or a backpack.

Warp
11-04-2010, 14:54
First off I'm in no way suggesting anyone impersonate a cop. But you have to admit, a cop's duty belt is a pretty efficient way to carry a good amount of weapons/tools from gun, mags, light, batteries, knife/multi-tool, phone, first aid/meds, etc. Plus you can wear them over top of another belt/shirt/etc.

Anyone have a duty belt packed as part of your preps? Is it a bad/inefficient idea for any reason?

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks!

-Emt1581



Uh.....NO.

And I even have most of the stuff leftover from the academy last year. I'm not a cop. I'm not in LE. Therefore I will not be wearing a duty belt.

And based on all of the things you have listed I am going to assume you have never actually put together a 'duty belt' and are just randomly listing off categories of items you think might be able to go on one. I will also assume you have never attempted physical activities while wearing a belt loaded with all of that stuff. Let me tell you, it negatively affects your movement more than you might think.

3dogs
11-12-2010, 19:27
Uh.....NO.

And I even have most of the stuff leftover from the academy last year. I'm not a cop. I'm not in LE. Therefore I will not be wearing a duty belt.

And based on all of the things you have listed I am going to assume you have never actually put together a 'duty belt' and are just randomly listing off categories of items you think might be able to go on one. I will also assume you have never attempted physical activities while wearing a belt loaded with all of that stuff. Let me tell you, it negatively affects your movement more than you might think.

^^ this ^^

with the vest, belt and boots, i go to work 35-40 pounds heavier than i get out of the shower.

i have a 5.11 tac vest for when it's time to be someplace else.

223242
11-29-2010, 14:05


Lt Scott 14
12-02-2010, 01:25
After 19 yrs of duty belts, I appreciate Kydex belt holsters, single mag cs, and handcuff cs when on Court House Security. If you are 25 yrs old, your lower back and vertebrae aren't jammed up yet from sliding out of patrol cars, knees blown from crawling/jumping fences/etc. For SHTF fast bug out the duty gear belt has organized stuff. You could dump what isn't usefull later, but again weight saving means a lot on the long road ahead. Gun shows sell a ton of used new gear at discount prices. Look around and try it without putting a lot of $ into it. I have 3 set ups not really being used. 1-Bianchi Nylon, 1-19 yr old Basketweave Leather (Dept Issue), 1- Military style w/Um84 holster and nylon pouches w/ alice clips. They work if needed. I also have a raid vest stocked and ready to roll. A combo might be best for you.

lanceofnorfolk
12-06-2010, 00:47
I think a good plan of action in a SHTF situation the only tool you will need access to fastest will probably be you primary weapon. So a ruck sack/backpack with ammo/med/mre ,long gun with a scope on my back, G21 on my side in a holster with my 27 round mags, and 1 good buck knife. Not so much for the duty belt with alot of extras.

Maine1
12-06-2010, 01:29
maybe, depends on your area, and how much stuff you expect to haul around. Lookingat current LEO's as a positive example may not be the best idea: they are carrying a ton of gear. At work, we wear duty belts with the basics, and kept that way, they are not too bad. Some guys just can't resist filling every little bit of space on the belt. Its much the same with LBE belts- i hated the mag pouches over each thigh, it prevented me from getting very low, was a PITA when running and crawling, ect.

Now, if you got one of the newer security fastex-buckeld nylon jobs, and put JUST a holster and x2 mag pouch on it, behind the hips, and used it as a way to quickly don your gear, it might be workable. having too much belt level crap makes you too wide, catches on ****, ect.

I am leaning heavily toward a bandoleer-type rig. It can be slung on fast, holds enough, and if attached to the off side belt is secure enough to reload weapons from, ect. Plus not as hot as a vest, easily goes over a variety of clothing. Downside is you have to make it yourself, but that is no biggie.

I think that having ANY quickly-donned, easily acsessable way to store your primary gear ready in advance is a great idea. You just have to find what works for you.

BR549
05-10-2011, 09:09
Duty belt alone - not anymore.

Some of the first-line-belts/war-belts these days are as good as or better than some of the serious fannypacks/lumbar-packs I've used on backpacking trips, which have been given away or are stored away with no evidence of use.

The main advantage for me personally is the use of it during hot temperatures. Also, it does not get in the way when bowhunting or fishing.

Do it right & do it light, and it works....for some things. Too heavy and/or poor positioning will cause grief.

Spikehorn11
05-10-2011, 09:32
My nylon duty belt weighs about 12 pounds fully loaded with a sidearm, 2 mags, flashlight, baton, and other miscellaneous items. Would I wear it when SHTF? Probably.

But then again, I am used to it and I know where everything is and it's second nature to me. I personally prefer a LBE type vest for a setup. Try sitting for an extended period of time or manuevering in tight quarters and the shortcomings of a full duty belt will become quite apparent.


I think I would wear mine for the same reason. I know when stressed I would revert back to training. SOP said we had to wear the mag pouch at 11 O'clock with the flaps toward our left. I notice that even when not wearing my duty rig that is the first spot I reach for when I grad a mag to reload.

I know I could retrain myself but after 2500-3000 rounds training that way I am going to stick with it.

cowboy1964
05-10-2011, 09:42
http://batmania.misentropy.com/photo/1280/706001955/1/tumblr_l2l6lkvdcN1qza47e

lwt210
05-10-2011, 10:20
After wearing a duty belt for the last 15 years, I can attest that it is not the preferred method of toting gear.

I'd go load bearing vest and not look back.

My knees, feet, and back hurt all the time.

Captain Boogie
05-10-2011, 14:06
I were a duty belt daily. After a while, I got used to the weight and bulk. I would not have the same belt set up for "SHTF," unless of course I was working, or called to work, or needed to act in official capacity. Then, I would be having a duty belt.

Whilst overseas, I wore a riggers belt with a cut down 6004 holster - cut the shroud down, removed the upper strap, had the bottom strap riding a couple inches below the crotch. No mobility issues. Guys that had a dangly thigh rig were not comfortable on long walks through the countryside. I had a nylon double mag pouch on the belt to put mags in when armor was off. That worked well for me. I find that a higher thigh rig, or a slightly dropped belt holster, works well for open carry.

I like to have a nylon duty belt with some type of holster and a mag pouch on it for taking to the range. Of course, I also train with duty belt carry, concealed carry, etc.

The advantage of a duty belt is you have it all right there ready to go, just buckle up and snap on some keepers. Its a faster method than taking off your belt and threading on multiple pouches. It is not the best for all situations.

To sum up, many ways work for many people. I just try to generally keep my pistol around 3 oclock and the mags between 9 and 11 oclock. Then, I can use multiple setups.

Try it, see if it works.

TangoFoxtrot
05-10-2011, 16:33
First off I'm in no way suggesting anyone impersonate a cop. But you have to admit, a cop's duty belt is a pretty efficient way to carry a good amount of weapons/tools from gun, mags, light, batteries, knife/multi-tool, phone, first aid/meds, etc. Plus you can wear them over top of another belt/shirt/etc.

Anyone have a duty belt packed as part of your preps? Is it a bad/inefficient idea for any reason?

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks!

-Emt1581


Hey EMT heres the deal. In a SHTF senario, a police duty belt yells" SHOOT ME I'AM A MORON!" You actually want to CCW to keep a "low" profile.

RatDrall
05-10-2011, 16:43
Hey EMT heres the dealeo. In a SHTF senario, a police duty belt yells" SHOOT ME I'AM A MORON!" You actually want to CCW to keep a "low" profile.

He didn't list anything that you couldn't cover with a hoodie or a light jacket.

emt1581
05-10-2011, 17:24
He didn't list anything that you couldn't cover with a hoodie or a light jacket.

In colder weather a ski jacket would conceal decently IMO.

-Emt1581

Grayson
05-10-2011, 18:58
I definitely agree that the major advantage to some variation of the duty belt is the ability to conceal it.

Eh, to a point maybe.

I have a 5.11 vest on hand for such an occasion where I can have lots of "stuff" handy yet still be relatively low-key. And while there are no doubt better things to use if things get to the point where concealment don't MATTER, I think there are worse things to use too.

volsbear
05-10-2011, 19:11
Eh, to a point maybe.

I have a 5.11 vest on hand for such an occasion where I can have lots of "stuff" handy yet still be relatively low-key. And while there are no doubt better things to use if things get to the point where concealment don't MATTER, I think there are worse things to use too.

agreed

Kevin108
05-10-2011, 20:52
I like the idea but then I'm used to wearing a belt. I'm a carpenter and I have considered wearing my tool belt for carrying food and water when hiking.

TangoFoxtrot
05-11-2011, 14:44
He didn't list anything that you couldn't cover with a hoodie or a light jacket.


That may fly in colder weather..maybe. In the warmer months...I don't think so.

PBCounty
05-11-2011, 22:18
Depending on the circumstances, I think a duty belt is a fine idea. For a few years I wore one containing a pistol, two spare mags, a flashlight, radio, multi-tool and gloves while operating a 23' boat on 12 hour shifts. In was never a real discomfort nor a hinderance when operating the craft nor while climbing channel markers or bridges to perform maintenance tasks.

jdavionic
05-12-2011, 03:34
Duty Belt? No.

FerFAL has posted some time ago on another site about the idea of 'blending in' and the advantages to doing so. Having your super uber duty belt contradicts that idea and doesn't offer any real advantages that I can see.

AK_Stick
05-12-2011, 05:12
Unless I'm going to war, I'm skipping the belt.

And thats coming from a guy who wears a war-belt 24/7 at work.

That said, if you absolutely have to wear a belt, there is no substitute for a good war belt with suspenders and a properly worn thigh rig.

Mine is a SOE gear riggers belt, with Cobra buckle, ATS war-belt, SOE suspenders, 2 M-16 mags, 2 M9 mags, my Safariland pistol holster, and my laser flare I've also got a 6 mag drop leg, incase I've got enough time to grab my go-bag. Its my last ditch, bail with just what I'm wearing and GTFO gear.

http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d127/ak_stick/SO%20Tech%20Go%20Bag/IMG_0755.jpg

BR549
05-13-2011, 06:39
I want to mention something else that can be a problem with belts. When positioned low on the hips in front, the belt presses on or constricts the TRPs which limits mobility and/or causes early fatigue during long walks.

mac66
05-13-2011, 07:10
Replace the word "duty" with "gun". Lots of people wear gun belts. Cowboys, soldiers, hunters, security, etc. I don't think it is that far fetched to wear an external belt with a holster, mag carriers on it. Cops carry lots of stuff that most of us don't need to carry but that doesn't mean a good gun belt wouldn't be a good idea.

Back in the 1970's I wore a buckle-less Safariland velcro duty belt. I carried my revolver in a high rise holster, speed loader case, radio and handcuffs on duty. That was before all the crap that cops have to carry today. Drop the handcuffs and radio to make it lighter but either way it is a pretty efficient system. In the 1980s I worked on a plainclothes surveillance unit. We used a nylon duty gear for pistol and mags, handcuffs etc. (actually I used a leather pancake holster since it rode high and tight. I still use that as a gun belt on occasion when I am up at my hunting property on the back 40.

I also handgun hunt on occasion. What else would you use besides a gun belt?

If the SHTF, I would have no problem strapping on a gun belt.

EMT comes up with some real doozies sometimes but a gun belt is not really a bad idea.

Captain Boogie
05-19-2011, 11:36
I'm not sure that the idea was to wear a duty belt with gear because a hurricane is coming.... As just said by mac, it is simply the old idea of a gun belt. Wish I had used that phrase.

If the situation is more like a third world country, high crime, dangerous people about, then you could probably use a gun belt when out doing chores on the farm, etc.

I think that it goes without saying, or should, that in 99.9% of all possible SHTF scenarios, CCW is the only way to go.

BR549
07-20-2012, 09:06
tagged

kirgi08
07-20-2012, 09:18
:upeyes:

BR549
07-20-2012, 09:36
:yawn:

FireForged
07-20-2012, 09:54
this is over a year old

BR549
07-20-2012, 10:17
I saw it as an interesting topic. I apologize.

Let's get back to the chili dogs.

Maybe a warbelt could be worn by a hot dog preparer at his cart...

... with a set of tongs at 3:30..

.. a few Busses in various places for jabbing through ice or slicing buns...

... all concealed under a trench coat along with a Draco and LBV if you prefer...

...with drop leg bases for the 8.5" 12GA...

etc., etc.

Okay, forget it.

:wavey:

Myke_Hart
07-21-2012, 06:29
Unless I'm going to war, I'm skipping the belt.

And thats coming from a guy who wears a war-belt 24/7 at work.

That said, if you absolutely have to wear a belt, there is no substitute for a good war belt with suspenders and a properly worn thigh rig.

Mine is a SOE gear riggers belt, with Cobra buckle, ATS war-belt, SOE suspenders, 2 M-16 mags, 2 M9 mags, my Safariland pistol holster, and my laser flare I've also got a 6 mag drop leg, incase I've got enough time to grab my go-bag. Its my last ditch, bail with just what I'm wearing and GTFO gear.

http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d127/ak_stick/SO%20Tech%20Go%20Bag/IMG_0755.jpg

This is the rig I was thinking about. Below is a picture of older rig that is pretty cheap. I have one myself and you can really load it down and still be comfortable standing. Sometimes sitting or lying with this on gets uncomfortable with a ton of stuff on it.

What ever you do, make sure you do not use a leather belt if you are going to be in any wet or humid environment. You want a Nylon/synthetic woven web type belt in wet weather. Leather belts turn very soft when wet and then stretch or droop and eventually rots.

You can find these on ebay cheap.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll264/myke_hart/MISC/militarybeltsuspenders60_57.jpg

I like old stinky threads!

mac66
07-29-2012, 15:18
I saw it as an interesting topic. I apologize.

Let's get back to the chili dogs.

Maybe a warbelt could be worn by a hot dog preparer at his cart...

... with a set of tongs at 3:30..

.. a few Busses in various places for jabbing through ice or slicing buns...

... all concealed under a trench coat along with a Draco and LBV if you prefer...

...with drop leg bases for the 8.5" 12GA...

etc., etc.

Okay, forget it.

:wavey:

:rofl: :rofl:

yeah he kind of jumped the shark with the hot dog survival cart didn't he?

Warp
07-29-2012, 15:19
:rofl: :rofl:

yeah he kind of jumped the shark with the hot dog survival cart didn't he?

I think the shark was jumped years ago.

The impact weapons thread is my favorite.

TangoFoxtrot
07-30-2012, 03:09
:yawn:


:yawn: :yawn:

MoparMan1991
07-30-2012, 04:14
Keepers? Old Skool. When I was in Corrections I used a Bianchi Nylon velcro duty belt, with a velcro pants belt. No keepers needed.

LongGun1
07-30-2012, 09:08
bdc nails it again. whatever flavor you like, TRY IT now and see how well it actually works.


+1

I have worn one of these for about a decade now....(wearing it now)

http://tacticalgear.com/blackhawk-cqb-riggers-belt?utm_source=gs&utm_medium=sce&gclid=CIq-u9fVwbECFaOMTAodmyAA9g

..and it is my favorite & most worn belt.


I normally do not attach anything directly to the belt..
(other than a set of keys for work & those are on the riggers buckle)

..the MTE M2 & 2-way radio (at work) get attached to the belt loops..

..maybe an clip-on IWB after work.


But for carrying lots-of-gear..

...something like a LBV is much more practical...IME!

BR549
07-30-2012, 12:55
:yawn: :yawn:

:yawn: :yawn: :yawn:

BR549
07-30-2012, 13:12
It should probably be mentioned that belts are more easily worn properly for people whose waist is not so much larger than their hips.

:wavey: