I hate Linksys [Archive] - Glock Talk

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IndyGunFreak
11-30-2010, 05:20
Man, I was really disappointed tonight... I used to be a fan of Linksys. Tonight, changed my opinion of them dramatically. It wasn't difficult to set up, etc.. just a couple of things that 1. was a minor annoyance, and 2. was extremely annoying.

My sister moved out a couple months ago, and finally got DSL at her place, so I took her PC over there to get set up. A couple days ago, she ordered a Linksys WRT54GS2 router. It got here today, so I went over to set up her connection.

First, regarding the DSL setup. It was a piece of cake. Different than my last experience w/ AT&T, which turned out to be such a problem because of a big gaff on AT&T's part. Had her computer online in about 10min, made sure the connection was working, etc.

Insert the Linksys CD to use the automatic setup, come to the first step. "Replace current router" or "Install in combination with another router"... Well, I wasn't replacing one, and I didn't need to install it in combination of another one. So I chose replacing, went through the steps, didn't work. So I cleared all the IP's and what not, made sure I was working again via just the modem, and started over, this time choosing to install "in combination". Before you ask, the modem she got from AT&T, was just a modem, it was not a modem/router.

Go through the process, which appears to be working this time, Then (and this is what really honked me off) it starts installing all this crap on the computer, despite me checking NO, I don't want it. Home Network monitoring software, some folder sharing app, Norton trial, etc. Which of course were free, but kept popping up on the desktop to upgrade to the Pro version. So I uninstalled them, and these "helper apps" and the freakin connection stopped working. Tried to log into the router, no joy. So I reset everything, and start over, and it still installs those stupid apps, despite me telling it not to.

Finally got irritated, uninstalled the junkware, and setup the router w/o the walkthrough CD (which I probably should have done from the beginning). After that, it was smooth sailing. I've always thought Linksys had a better "router management" interface than Netgear, but they both work equally well. Setting up WPA2, etc.. was no problem.

What the heck happened to Linksys.. I can deal w/ minor installation issues, but installing the bloatware really irritated me.

IGF

filthy infidel
11-30-2010, 05:55
I'm not a fan either. I've installed a couple of the N series Linksys/Cisco wireless routers that worked for less than a week. And you have that BS bloatware constantly 'dinging' over every mousefart on the network.

Pierre!
11-30-2010, 06:00
WoW Indy - U Used the 'Magic Setup' ?

Braver man than I...:rofl:

Seriously, I have come in behind that 'easy setup' and when it fails, it's a Money Maker!

I first learned on the Netgear, and then swore against using it again. Well, perhaps swore AT it at every encounter.

I appreciate your optimistic thougths... but it looks like someone with any computer knowledge should NOT use the 'easy setup' option.

I can say that most 'easy setup' wireless routers I have had to touch haven't been done with security and safety in mind.

Followed a 'Geeky' install recently - it was an official cluster. They paid $200 to get the router setup Wide Open, and weakly password protected.

Still a lot of VooDoo out there, just need a bigger truck to haul the required chicken sacrifices some days...

Good to hear you soldiered through it just fine! and I will remember that even Linksys has gone suspect in the future!

PS - You didn't drop a Linux 'OS' on the router?!?!? :cool: Whaz Up Wid Dat??? :cool:

L8ter...

IndyGunFreak
11-30-2010, 06:11
PS - You didn't drop a Linux 'OS' on the router?!?!? :cool: Whaz Up Wid Dat??? :cool:

L8ter...

If it was mine.. maybe.. :rofl: It's not mine though.

As for setting it up w/ the "easy setup"... I've never used it with any router, because I use Linux I always had to do it manually, so I just got used to doing it that way.

I really don't know what on earth prompted me to use that CD, but I did, and I regret it. Won't make that mistake again, thats for sure. Can you imagine the unsuspecting users installing that nonsense thinking it's necessary, the constant pop ups, etc..? Ugh.. It'd be enough to make me go back to Dial up.

When AT&T offered to send her a wireless router, I told her not to do it, because I know around here, all the AT&T routers are WEP protected. Now I don't know if that's an end user issue, or what.. but I'd just assume most of them don't offer WPA. The Linksys WRT54G has long been one of my favorite routers, and still is, except for that stupid CD.

-10pts for me, for just not embracing my inner nerd, and setting it up manually from the beginning, like I knew I should have.. :)

IGF

tous
11-30-2010, 06:24
Just wait until you get to the adult Cisco equipment. :scared:
You will achieve a level of unimaginable, teeth-gritting frustration.

Always approach Cisco equipment wielding a large metal tool, prepared to do battle.

:supergrin:

srhoades
11-30-2010, 07:08
I never use the supplied CD's for installing routers, I just chuck 'em. Much rather do the configuring myself.

Pierre!
11-30-2010, 08:38
As for setting it up w/ the "easy setup"... I've never used it with any router, because I use Linux I always had to do it manually, so I just got used to doing it that way.

I really don't know what on earth prompted me to use that CD, but I did, and I regret it. Won't make that mistake again, thats for sure. Can you imagine the unsuspecting users installing that nonsense thinking it's necessary, the constant pop ups, etc..? Ugh.. It'd be enough to make me go back to Dial up.

When AT&T offered to send her a wireless router, I told her not to do it, because I know around here, all the AT&T routers are WEP protected. Now I don't know if that's an end user issue, or what.. but I'd just assume most of them don't offer WPA. The Linksys WRT54G has long been one of my favorite routers, and still is, except for that stupid CD.

-10pts for me, for just not embracing my inner nerd, and setting it up manually from the beginning, like I knew I should have.. :)
IGF

Hey, no points lost as long as you *LEARNED* from it, and if your sister is like my sister... it's not the FIRST time we used them to learn from something! :rofl: That's one thing sisters are usually good for... just got to catch it >just right< or it's trouble!

And, you also passed the info along, so it's all good!

+10 for sharing - Always negates the learning curve... and it's better to let family see you *sweat* - they some how appreciate it more! :supergrin:

Linux3
11-30-2010, 09:40
Just wait until you get to the adult Cisco equipment.
You will achieve a level of unimaginable, teeth-gritting frustration.
Always approach Cisco equipment wielding a large metal tool, prepared to do battle.
Maybe with Windows....
Lots of experience with Cisco routers and switches and I use Solaris and Linux.
Just write a simple bash shell script that echos commands to the Cisco.
Look at what you are doing and remove all typos before running and off you go.
Could not be easier.

IGF, I like Belkin for home routers and when in a lazy mood at my sister's house I ran their setup CD, plus I don't have any Windows machines so I wanted to see what it did.
We could have a contest as to which is worse, Linksys or Belkin. And removing the junk was just the pits.
Oh well. An interesting learning experience.

Toyman
11-30-2010, 10:24
...What the heck happened to Linksys.. I can deal w/ minor installation issues, but installing the bloatware really irritated me.
IGF

One word: Cisco

Green_Manelishi
11-30-2010, 10:27
Go through the process, which appears to be working this time, Then (and this is what really honked me off) it starts installing all this crap on the computer, despite me checking NO, I don't want it. Home Network monitoring software, some folder sharing app, Norton trial, etc. Which of course were free, but kept popping up on the desktop to upgrade to the Pro version. So I uninstalled them, and these "helper apps" and the freakin connection stopped working. Tried to log into the router, no joy. So I reset everything, and start over, and it still installs those stupid apps, despite me telling it not to.


"Would you like to install ..." is what is known as a rhetorical question. Kinda like Mom/Dad asking "How would you like to wash the dishes? The Car?"

solomansousana
11-30-2010, 10:45
Whenever I install a Linksys wireless router for a friend or at work, I simply go to Linksys's website and download the most current file for that router and run it. Never had issues with installing anything but what was needed to get the router up and running.

captainstormy
11-30-2010, 11:02
I love linksys routers myself. Though I've never used the CD that comes with them. I never saw the point. From the OPs story I don't think the problem was the router so much as the disk.

IndyGunFreak
11-30-2010, 11:53
I love linksys routers myself. Though I've never used the CD that comes with them. I never saw the point. From the OPs story I don't think the problem was the router so much as the disk.

True, it was the CD. The actual router is fine. I knew how to set up the router w/o the CD...it's something I've done many times w/ Windows and Linux. I'm gonna go out on a limb and say a majority of the people buying "home networking" routers, probably don't know how to set them up manually, and instead use that ridiculous CD.

Crazy stuff..

IGF

whitetiger7653
11-30-2010, 12:33
What the heck happened to Linksys

Cisco bought them. Prior to the buy out I swore up and down on Linksys. It was the only equipment I would buy. It was the only thing I let friends and family buy. I recommended it and purchased for small businesses. After the buy out and there extremely crappy customer service since, I won't come close to them.

I love my D-link extreme N router and I now recommend Dlink to everyone.

srhoades
11-30-2010, 13:07
Cisco bought them. Prior to the buy out I swore up and down on Linksys. It was the only equipment I would buy. It was the only thing I let friends and family buy. I recommended it and purchased for small businesses. After the buy out and there extremely crappy customer service since, I won't come close to them.

I love my D-link extreme N router and I now recommend Dlink to everyone.

I was the same way, I loved the original WRT54G rotuers. The new black Cisco boxes that look like some sort of Romulan ship, I despise. The coverage is terrible, and I've had several that just plain didn't work right out of the box and had to return. I too am now a D-link fan.

NMGlocker
11-30-2010, 16:30
Throw CD in trash, set router up directly through your browser.
No problem... unless you're a Mac/Linux geek I guess.
;)

IndyGunFreak
11-30-2010, 16:34
Throw CD in trash, set router up directly through your browser.
No problem... unless you're a Mac/Linux geek I guess.
;)

It's easy w/ Linux(at least for me.. I imagine if you don't know how, it could be hard).... but it's not much more difficult than Windows(ie, typing a few terminal commands)

IGF

MavsX
12-07-2010, 17:40
hahahah IGF what are you doing installing that CD!!! hahahhaha linksys has had garbage on those cds for awhile hahahah sorry bro

lightsareout
12-13-2010, 10:33
Man, I was really disappointed tonight... I used to be a fan of Linksys. Tonight, changed my opinion of them dramatically. It wasn't difficult to set up, etc.. just a couple of things that 1. was a minor annoyance, and 2. was extremely annoying.

My sister moved out a couple months ago, and finally got DSL at her place, so I took her PC over there to get set up. A couple days ago, she ordered a Linksys WRT54GS2 router. It got here today, so I went over to set up her connection.

First, regarding the DSL setup. It was a piece of cake. Different than my last experience w/ AT&T, which turned out to be such a problem because of a big gaff on AT&T's part. Had her computer online in about 10min, made sure the connection was working, etc.

Insert the Linksys CD to use the automatic setup, come to the first step. "Replace current router" or "Install in combination with another router"... Well, I wasn't replacing one, and I didn't need to install it in combination of another one. So I chose replacing, went through the steps, didn't work. So I cleared all the IP's and what not, made sure I was working again via just the modem, and started over, this time choosing to install "in combination". Before you ask, the modem she got from AT&T, was just a modem, it was not a modem/router.

Go through the process, which appears to be working this time, Then (and this is what really honked me off) it starts installing all this crap on the computer, despite me checking NO, I don't want it. Home Network monitoring software, some folder sharing app, Norton trial, etc. Which of course were free, but kept popping up on the desktop to upgrade to the Pro version. So I uninstalled them, and these "helper apps" and the freakin connection stopped working. Tried to log into the router, no joy. So I reset everything, and start over, and it still installs those stupid apps, despite me telling it not to.

Finally got irritated, uninstalled the junkware, and setup the router w/o the walkthrough CD (which I probably should have done from the beginning). After that, it was smooth sailing. I've always thought Linksys had a better "router management" interface than Netgear, but they both work equally well. Setting up WPA2, etc.. was no problem.

What the heck happened to Linksys.. I can deal w/ minor installation issues, but installing the bloatware really irritated me.

IGF

There's your problem

Linksys is by far the best home networking company out there

IndyGunFreak
12-13-2010, 15:09
There's your problem

Linksys is by far the best home networking company out there

I guess that's a matter of debate, personally I think for most home networks, all of the "major brands" (Linksys, D-Link, Netgear, Belkin) all make a pretty good router.

Using the "automatic installation CD", should not install a ton of bloatware on your machine.

kc8ykd
12-13-2010, 15:15
I guess that's a matter of debate, personally I think for most home networks, all of the "major brands" (Linksys, D-Link, Netgear, Belkin) all make a pretty good router.

Using the "automatic installation CD", should not install a ton of bloatware on your machine.

i agree, and totally agree about the installation cd.

i do wonder tho, if that's something that's common amongst manufacturer's 'installation' software these days.

datnvan
12-13-2010, 15:47
i switched to netgear years ago and havent looked back.

Rabbit994
12-13-2010, 15:53
It's common about that extra software. I'm in Small Business IT support and that extra software falls under 1 of 2 categories.

A. It's desperate attempt to cut down on support calls by having software do some configuration for them. However, since support costs money, this software is trying to save money and by saving money, they write crappy software.

B. It's attempt to earn more money. Norton and others pay for their software to be installed on PCs.

As you can see, it's all about money. ;)

They all suck, NetGear, Linksys, D-Link. Made by the same people with different label slapped on it.