rsxr22, this is for you... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Quack
12-20-2010, 09:15
wonder if Nighthawk changed things since this post? :whistling:

Stephen,

The design involves the length of travel the slide has on the rails based on the slide rail grooves in the slide and the position of the ejector, and the disconnector based on frame design. We have designed our frames and slides for the best fit and function (dependability and reliability) and longest life of components including the recoil spring and guide rod that we can, without excessive friction and wear, and to prevent failures, in this process the (slide rail) groove length and the ejector and disconnector placement does not allow for enough travel for a sling shot. This keeps the recoil spring from binding up, prevents the spring from being compressed beyond the parameters allowable and also can help prevent from binding the spring against the guide, causing wear on the guide rod and frame itself, not necessarily serious wear, but wear and we want to prevent that as much as possible. Keep in mind that some companies state their weapons will do this and are designed for it, on those I would contact each one of them individually and check to see what they advise, but ours are not designed for it and we do not recommend it as it can cause issues.

Thanks
Larry
__________________
Larry Lyles
Nighthawk Custom
http://www.nighthawkcustom.com

In terms of slide travel, it is essentially the same, however, in the terms of velocity, kinetic energy and timing it is different. When the slide travels during (with proper grip) recoil (firing a round down range), everything works as designed, in reference to velocity, energy dispersement and timing, the slide is able to travel the full length of recoil and back and properly feeds a round into the chamber ready to fire again without hesitation. During sling shot, as the slide is pulled back and then released, the front of the frame comes up slightly, then when the slide is released, the nose of the weapon dives as well, (the distance of travel is not always the same nor is the grip on the weapon usually as tight as it is during recoil and firing) absorbing some of the energy of the slide traveling forward, this can cause a feed issue. (similar process where limp wristing while firing can cause an issue as well) We do have a shorter slide travel (rearward) as compared to (some) others in the area of frame rail to slide rail groves in distance traveled, we also time the weapons to work with this system so it does not compromise the reliability of slide lock on an empty magazine, the key is to always keep a good recoil spring installed, and change them out at recommended intervals. I am not saying that there is not someone out there who can keep the same grip and do a slingshot the same each time, but generally in most cases it can cause an issue on feeding, and also may cause slight excessive wear or other issues. We always recommend dropping the slide with the slide release for best results.
We do not recommend shok buff use in Nighthawk Custom weapons, with most weapons the shok buffs are not recommended on less than 5" barrel length, and if you install a shok buff, always manually cycle the weapon, if it is too "tight" to go to slide lock on an empty magazine, or if the mfgr. does not recommend the shok buff, then do not use it in that weapon.

Thanks
Larry


Thanks
Larry
__________________
Larry Lyles
Nighthawk Custom
http://www.nighthawkcustom.com

brzusa.1911
12-20-2010, 10:08
wonder if Nighthawk changed things since this post?


Stephen,

The design involves the length of travel the slide has on the rails based on the slide rail grooves in the slide and the position of the ejector, and the disconnector based on frame design. We have designed our frames and slides for the best fit and function (dependability and reliability) and longest life of components including the recoil spring and guide rod that we can, without excessive friction and wear, and to prevent failures, in this process the (slide rail) groove length and the ejector and disconnector placement does not allow for enough travel for a sling shot. This keeps the recoil spring from binding up, prevents the spring from being compressed beyond the parameters allowable and also can help prevent from binding the spring against the guide, causing wear on the guide rod and frame itself, not necessarily serious wear, but wear and we want to prevent that as much as possible. Keep in mind that some companies state their weapons will do this and are designed for it, on those I would contact each one of them individually and check to see what they advise, but ours are not designed for it and we do not recommend it as it can cause issues.

Thanks
Larry
__________________
Larry Lyles
Nighthawk Custom
http://www.nighthawkcustom.com (http://www.nighthawkcustom.com/)



In terms of slide travel, it is essentially the same, however, in the terms of velocity, kinetic energy and timing it is different. When the slide travels during (with proper grip) recoil (firing a round down range), everything works as designed, in reference to velocity, energy dispersement and timing, the slide is able to travel the full length of recoil and back and properly feeds a round into the chamber ready to fire again without hesitation. During sling shot, as the slide is pulled back and then released, the front of the frame comes up slightly, then when the slide is released, the nose of the weapon dives as well, (the distance of travel is not always the same nor is the grip on the weapon usually as tight as it is during recoil and firing) absorbing some of the energy of the slide traveling forward, this can cause a feed issue. (similar process where limp wristing while firing can cause an issue as well) We do have a shorter slide travel (rearward) as compared to (some) others in the area of frame rail to slide rail groves in distance traveled, we also time the weapons to work with this system so it does not compromise the reliability of slide lock on an empty magazine, the key is to always keep a good recoil spring installed, and change them out at recommended intervals. I am not saying that there is not someone out there who can keep the same grip and do a slingshot the same each time, but generally in most cases it can cause an issue on feeding, and also may cause slight excessive wear or other issues. We always recommend dropping the slide with the slide release for best results.
We do not recommend shok buff use in Nighthawk Custom weapons, with most weapons the shok buffs are not recommended on less than 5" barrel length, and if you install a shok buff, always manually cycle the weapon, if it is too "tight" to go to slide lock on an empty magazine, or if the mfgr. does not recommend the shok buff, then do not use it in that weapon.

Thanks
Larry


Thanks
Larry
__________________
Larry Lyles
Nighthawk Custom
http://www.nighthawkcustom.com (http://www.nighthawkcustom.com/)





Thanks for posting that Quack!

p.s. where did you get these quotes from?

Quack
12-20-2010, 10:45
http://forum.m1911.org/showthread.php?t=48862&page=15&pp=10

MD357
12-20-2010, 13:08
Kind of just lost an amount of respect for NH. If you're lazy and cut corners, you should admit it.

brzusa.1911
12-20-2010, 14:22
Kind of just lost an amount of respect for NH. If you're lazy and cut corners, you should admit it.

Internet expert :faint:

rsxr22
12-20-2010, 17:28
Wow thats news to me! But very good research Don! I am not sure, but I know when we shot about 1k through his Predator, I used an overhand slingshot everytime because that is the most efficient way in my opinion and never had an issue. It might just be them trying to cover their arse as well. Kahr recommends only using the slide stop as well which i dont understnad? But I shot around 700 rounds through my PM9 only using slingshot again with no problems. Hopefully I'll be able to get some answers for this tomorrow!!