Crossbow hunters, chime in... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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G36's Rule
12-20-2010, 18:11
I would like to hear from those of you that hunt with Crossbows. I'm looking to get back into Archery hunting, but can not pull a standard bow back any more due to shoulder problems.

I have been looking at the Horton Vision 175 and one of the Tenpoint Phantom bows, but they are pricey. What do you use, how do you like it, how effective is it?

Thanks

vafish
12-20-2010, 19:25
I have a Barnett Revolution.

It works very well, but just like a compound bow you have to practice with it. They aren't some sort of magic tool for killing deer. They might give you about 10 yards more range then a decent compound bow.

They also are very noisy. If a deer has spotted you or is acting very skiddish they can still jump the string on you with the crossbow.

G36's Rule
12-20-2010, 19:29
Thanks. I have hunted with Archery equipment quite a bit in the past, so I understand the limitations. And I understand that the Crossbow has those same limits.

What weight bolt are you shooting? And what velocity? How much penetration are you getting?

vafish
12-21-2010, 18:58
I'd have to weigh the bolts to be sure, they are 22" carbon express with 125 gr broad heads. Looking up on line they should be 440 grains.

It's rated by the manufacture at 345 fps. I'm getting a chrono for Christmas so I'll be able to test it for sure in a few days.

The penetrate completely through the deer and bury half way into the dirt behind the deer.

jetsfan-24
12-22-2010, 17:27
i shoot a parker tornado i,d give it a a+

bluejackets92fs
12-22-2010, 17:46
I'd look into a cocking aid with the shoulder problems. For some, a crossbow is harder to use than a traditional, recurve, or compound. To ethically kill almost any animal in North America, all you need is 150 IBO. A 40lb draw weight compound with 80% let off would get you there and some. Just something to also consider.

If you are set on a Crossbow, brands to stay away from, Sorry vafish, Barnett is one of them. Horton as well. I use to work with archery equipment and Horton bows are next to impossible to find parts for. For every two Barnett bows we sold, one came back with problems such as limbs cracking, shattering, or the sting latch quit working. The Barnetts automatically go into safety after they are cocked and this sometimes failed. Brands to consider, Ten Point, Parker, and Excalibur. Excalibur are very good but they are recurve style so you are pulling all the weight where the compound style are easier. Pm me if you want more info.

vafish
12-22-2010, 19:51
I'd look into a cocking aid with the shoulder problems. For some, a crossbow is harder to use than a traditional, recurve, or compound. To ethically kill almost any animal in North America, all you need is 150 IBO. A 40lb draw weight compound with 80% let off would get you there and some. Just something to also consider.

If you are set on a Crossbow, brands to stay away from, Sorry vafish, Barnett is one of them. Horton as well. I use to work with archery equipment and Horton bows are next to impossible to find parts for. For every two Barnett bows we sold, one came back with problems such as limbs cracking, shattering, or the sting latch quit working. The Barnetts automatically go into safety after they are cocked and this sometimes failed. Brands to consider, Ten Point, Parker, and Excalibur. Excalibur are very good but they are recurve style so you are pulling all the weight where the compound style are easier. Pm me if you want more info.

No offense taken, I've heard others say the Barnett's are low end crossbows.

Mine has worked fine for 4 seasons and half a dozen deer.

bluejackets92fs
12-22-2010, 20:09
No offense taken, I've heard others say the Barnett's are low end crossbows.

Mine has worked fine for 4 seasons and half a dozen deer.

I wasn't trying to rag you in anyway. Just giving my .02. If it works for you then that's all that matters.

method
12-22-2010, 23:27
I'd look into a cocking aid with the shoulder problems. For some, a crossbow is harder to use than a traditional, recurve, or compound. To ethically kill almost any animal in North America, all you need is 150 IBO. A 40lb draw weight compound with 80% let off would get you there and some. Just something to also consider.

If you are set on a Crossbow, brands to stay away from, Sorry vafish, Barnett is one of them. Horton as well. I use to work with archery equipment and Horton bows are next to impossible to find parts for. For every two Barnett bows we sold, one came back with problems such as limbs cracking, shattering, or the sting latch quit working. The Barnetts automatically go into safety after they are cocked and this sometimes failed. Brands to consider, Ten Point, Parker, and Excalibur. Excalibur are very good but they are recurve style so you are pulling all the weight where the compound style are easier. Pm me if you want more info.


A 40lb bow might be OK on deer with the right broadhead, 'almost any animal in North America', I don't think so.

A compound crossbow may not be 150lbs at full draw, but you'll still have to pull 150lbs to get there.

bluejackets92fs
12-22-2010, 23:37
A 40lb bow might be OK on deer with the right broadhead, 'almost any animal in North America', I don't think so.

A compound crossbow may not be 150lbs at full draw, but you'll still have to pull 150lbs to get there.

Yes, almost every thing. Obviously not moose and caribou. Elk and down are easily taken in those IBO speeds.

As for the 150lb crossbow. I know you are pulling the weight but it is easier to do on a compound vs a recurve style. See what I'm saying?

G36's Rule
12-23-2010, 20:52
I'd look into a cocking aid with the shoulder problems. For some, a crossbow is harder to use than a traditional, recurve, or compound. To ethically kill almost any animal in North America, all you need is 150 IBO. A 40lb draw weight compound with 80% let off would get you there and some. Just something to also consider.

If you are set on a Crossbow, brands to stay away from, Sorry vafish, Barnett is one of them. Horton as well. I use to work with archery equipment and Horton bows are next to impossible to find parts for. For every two Barnett bows we sold, one came back with problems such as limbs cracking, shattering, or the sting latch quit working. The Barnetts automatically go into safety after they are cocked and this sometimes failed. Brands to consider, Ten Point, Parker, and Excalibur. Excalibur are very good but they are recurve style so you are pulling all the weight where the compound style are easier. Pm me if you want more info.

I could probably pull a 60# compound with no issues a couple times, but in order to practice like I used to there is no way I can do that motion repeatedly.

I have looked at the Horton and really like the Vision, but I've also been reading the same criticisms you said. A bow shop local to me will not even order one because they say they have had several blow up.

:dunno:

The TenPoint bows have an option for a crank and that would be nice. Dang they are expensive though.

bluejackets92fs
12-23-2010, 20:56
I could probably pull a 60# compound with no issues a couple times, but in order to practice like I used to there is no way I can do that motion repeatedly.

I have looked at the Horton and really like the Vision, but I've also been reading the same criticisms you said. A bow shop local to me will not even order one because they say they have had several blow up.

:dunno:

The TenPoint bows have an option for a crank and that would be nice. Dang they are expensive though.

The Ten Points have a built in crank. You can get others that are a little harder to use but still make it easier. My advice is to go to a shop and see which one is easier to use. My guess is you will find a compound easier.