Year Supply of Food [Archive] - Glock Talk

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patermagnus
01-09-2011, 19:32
Any recommendations on where to buy a year supply of food? Looking for the dehydrated/long storage type. Would prefer to buy as a package unless someone has a great plan for putting together components. Really want something that can just sit and not have to be rotated/replaced.

Or a recommend a source where I can learn more. Have done the google thing, but I know the top hits just are paid advertisements....not necessarily a bad thing, but I don't want that to be my only source of info.

JC Refuge
01-09-2011, 20:10
Well, as much as I try to avoid referring to my own company in this forum--you make it impossible for me not to toot our own horn in response to your question ...

Our Safecastle Royal Buyers Club (http://store.prepared.pro/) offers some of the best pricing you can find on most long-term foods (http://store.prepared.pro/storagefoodandprep.aspx) (note that our club members get 20% or more off most everything in our store), to include free shipping all the time for everyone on anything they purchase.

Shelf life varies according to specific foods but they range from 4 years to 30 years, most being the 10-20 year window. Or in the case of Mountain House freeze dried foods in cans, you have 25 years plus (the MH cans are the one type of listing we cannot always discount for members due to manufacturer rules, but we do provide members with rebate gift certificates).

You didn't provide details on how many people you are looking to sustain.

But our most comprehensive package is our Get It Done (http://store.prepared.pro/get-it-done-90-cases-of-food.aspx) package. Since we introduced this package several months ago, we've sold a surprising number of them to folks who today are feeling the urgency of the situation. It has 91 different cases (92 in a couple of days when we get a case of assorted spices added).

That package provides a snapshot of some of the best long-term storage foods out there--including freeze-dried entrees, dehydrated staples, wet-pack meats, canned dairy products, and more.

Another very popular option is our 36-case Mountain House can-case package: http://store.prepared.pro/35casesmountainhousefood.aspx

On MH cans, they're most affordable during one of our three MH sales per year when we discount the canned foods 25%. Note that when you have a variety of MH cans on hand, a quick rule of thumb you can use is one case of food per adult per week. So about 50 cases of MH food will be good to get one person thru one year--though we would hope you would supplement MH food with other high-cal, high-fat items such as chocolate and peanut butter.

Wherever you get your food--don't get suckered by the sellers who will try to pass off an impossibly low-priced food package as being adequate to sustain you for a long period of time. The first thing you need to look at for any package like that is how many calories does it provide? A minimum of 2000 calories a day is required to sustain an adult, on average. You can easily find a lot of food packages out there that characterize a daily food allowance of 400-600 calories a day as being enough. You find that, that's bad news and often you will run into other problems with transactions where that kind of deception is practiced. (According to government stats, the average Americans spends about $12 a day for food. Don't expect good food packaged to last almost forever to come in under that.)

The other thing you want to consider right off the bat is what kind of food do you want to be eating during the darkest days of your life? Rice and beans exclusively? They will deliver calories economically. But food fatigue is a real serious issue in times of crisis for some folks. Mealtime can be the highlight of the day--or the whole reason for getting out of bed.

Anyway--that is my two-minute pep-talk on long-term storage foods. It's about peace of mind at the very least. The way things are going today--it may very well be about the best investment you can make, providing you with substantive assets that cannot easily be devalued.

patermagnus
01-09-2011, 21:41
How big is a case of MH food?

Do you find that listed serving sizes for MH are accurate? In doing camping research, I found many people advising to buy a 4 serving size for 2 adult men. Admittedly, I have not tried them.

I have 2 adults and 5 kids in my family...that is a lot of mouths and not much storage space....so when do you have your sales? If you don't want to list the times of your sales here, feel free to PM me.

I would think a combination of MH and whole grain/TVP/beans & rice to be reasonable...would likely be less expensive than just MH and avoid food fatigue.

JC Refuge
01-10-2011, 07:31
A case of MH food is six #10 cans. The dimensions of a case are 13 x 19 x 8 (inches). For, say, 36 cases of MH food--visualize a pallet stacked chest high.

Serving size for all foods sold in the US are determined by the USDA and FDA. Manufacturers do not have any say in what a serving is. The definition of a serving is the average amount of that given variety of food at one eating occasion. Americans typically eat more than one type of food per meal.

I explain that because some folks count one serving as being one meal. You are correct to figure roughly two servings of most any food per meal as a better guesstimate as being adequate. But again--calorie count is far more accurate. For MH foods--yes--two servings per meal is advised per adult in your calculations.

MH food does come in single, double, and 4-serving mylar pouches. Good for camping, bug out bags, car survival kits, etc. The shelf life on those is 7 years. (Our buyers club members do receive 20% off those listings.)

Our MH can sale schedule this year is a bit up in the air given the current MH backlog of orders that is slowing order processing at the factory. I am hopeful that our first sale of the year will be launched in the next few weeks.