Forced into the realm of Linux [Archive] - Glock Talk

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havensal
01-20-2011, 04:52
I am being forced into the realm of Linux. They are recommending Ubuntu, which I agree with. It is just for one piece of engineering software. Everything else will still be run in Win7.

Now the question is do I go dual boot w/ Win7 or VM it? I am thinking VM would be the better option. It just seems safer to me and we should be able to switch back and forth between Win7 and Ubuntu as needed.

Where is the best place to start learning how to run Ubuntu?

I tried it a few years ago but even something as simple as installing a piece of software was impossible for me to grasp. :faint:

I am a PC and I don't like change. :tongueout:

Anyone have any experience loading Linux on a Dell Inspiron 9100? I have a spare laying around that I can play with. I could also get my hands on a 9300 or 9400if either of those would be better. :dunno:

gemeinschaft
01-20-2011, 05:53
I would just go ahead and install Ubuntu on a spare machine and use it. That's the best way to learn.

Linux3
01-20-2011, 05:55
I am being forced into the realm of Linux. They are recommending Ubuntu, which I agree with. It is just for one piece of engineering software. Everything else will still be run in Win7.

Now the question is do I go dual boot w/ Win7 or VM it? I am thinking VM would be the better option. It just seems safer to me and we should be able to switch back and forth between Win7 and Ubuntu as needed.

Where is the best place to start learning how to run Ubuntu?

I tried it a few years ago but even something as simple as installing a piece of software was impossible for me to grasp. :faint:

I am a PC and I don't like change. :tongueout:

Anyone have any experience loading Linux on a Dell Inspiron 9100? I have a spare laying around that I can play with. I could also get my hands on a 9300 or 9400if either of those would be better. :dunno:
Why would you dual boot? If you need Linux for some engineering app just run everything in Linux.
I have no idea what engineering software you are talking about. A little more detail please but! If you run Ubuntu as a VM client you will not get the full power of your system. Does this software require power?
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot

You say everything else runs in Windows. But do you need Windows? Will everything else run in Linux?

As for software install under Ubuntu, you just need to read the release notes or ask questions here. Believe me Ubuntu Linux is way, way easier to update, manage and install than Windows once you learn how.
Gogle for a Linux Users Group, LUG, in your area and attend a few meetings. See when they have an installfest.

Life is nothing but change so you better get used to it. You had to go from what XP to Windows 7? That was change.
Forget installing Ubuntu on an old piece of cr** Dell because you will just think it's a slow and clunky O.S.
Read the link I sent.
Look for a LUG.
Does your company have IT support?
Ubuntu is fun. It's easier to manage, viruses and such will be just a bad memory and messed up drivers and BSoD will be a thing of the past.

havensal
01-20-2011, 07:41
Why would you dual boot? If you need Linux for some engineering app just run everything in Linux.

Re run some very specialized engineering software. The latest we are looking into runs only in Linux. We have others that run only under Windows and a couple that run only with MS Excel.

I have no idea what engineering software you are talking about. A little more detail please but! If you run Ubuntu as a VM client you will not get the full power of your system. Does this software require power?

I am not sure what specs are required yet. Not graphics intensive, I don't think, just processor intensive.


https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot

You say everything else runs in Windows. But do you need Windows? Will everything else run in Linux?

As for software install under Ubuntu, you just need to read the release notes or ask questions here. Believe me Ubuntu Linux is way, way easier to update, manage and install than Windows once you learn how.
Gogle for a Linux Users Group, LUG, in your area and attend a few meetings. See when they have an installfest.

Life is nothing but change so you better get used to it. You had to go from what XP to Windows 7? That was change.
Forget installing Ubuntu on an old piece of cr** Dell because you will just think it's a slow and clunky O.S.
Read the link I sent.
Look for a LUG.
Does your company have IT support?

i am the IT dept. That's why I need to teach myself Linux, so I can keep everything running happy.

I'll have to see where the closest group would be. Probably a couple of hours away.




Ubuntu is fun. It's easier to manage, viruses and such will be just a bad memory and messed up drivers and BSoD will be a thing of the past.



I don't foresee our entire engineering dept. moving to Linux any time soon.

gemeinschaft
01-20-2011, 07:53
I got tired of having to go to my mom's house all the time to fix her PC. She was always getting viruses and despite my best efforts to educate her on what not to open, she just doesn't get it.

I decided to install Ubuntu and she loves it.

My mom could never figure out how to program a VCR, so if she finds Ubuntu easy to use, I have full confidence that an engineer will have no problem.

You may even find that you can do things with Ubuntu that you couldn't do before on a windows machine.

My personal PC is Ubuntu and I prefer it over Windows 7.

McJohnny
01-20-2011, 08:06
I multi boot my home lab box and dual boot my work laptop. I run Ubuntu unless I need to do windows stuff, at which time I'll boot Win7.

A VM would be a great alternative, depending on what your actual needs are. I would indeed load something up on your spare machine for the experience. Ubuntu is a great distro to start with, and once you get it loaded I'd be surprised if you don't come to prefer it over windows. :)

Electrikkoolaid
01-20-2011, 08:21
I would instead recommend Linux Mint 10 (http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=1581).

It is based on Ubuntu, but has a number of tweaks, default settings, and helper programs (http://www.linuxmint.com/rel_julia_whatsnew.php) that make it the most "Windows-like" Linux distibution I've seen. That makes the transition to the new operating system fairly easy.

It is the one I install for my non-techie friends as it is "Linux on training wheels", yet still has all the power and configuration options of Ubuntu under the hood.

I would dual boot. You can also just burn a DVD (or CD) and run it "Live" to try it out before you install it.

Good luck.

IndyGunFreak
01-20-2011, 09:02
I would instead recommend Linux Mint 10 (http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=1581).

It is based on Ubuntu, but has a number of tweaks, default settings, and helper programs (http://www.linuxmint.com/rel_julia_whatsnew.php) that make it the most "Windows-like" Linux distibution I've seen. That makes the transition to the new operating system fairly easy.

It is the one I install for my non-techie friends as it is "Linux on training wheels", yet still has all the power and configuration options of Ubuntu under the hood.

I would dual boot. You can also just burn a DVD (or CD) and run it "Live" to try it out before you install it.

Good luck.

I would recommend AGAINST Linux Mint 10. Their support channels are awful. You can do all the tweaks, etc.. that they've done to Mint.... to Ubuntu in about 20min. It's a nice OS, but if you think Ubuntu is bloated, Mint takes it to another level. I just don't think it has anything at all to offer over Ubuntu. Before I start being accused of being a fanboy, I don't even use Ubuntu anymore(and haven't for some time) but I'm still fairly active in Ubuntu support channels/forums, because I think its the best place for newbs to learn Linux. Ubuntu gave me a great step ladder to where I am now.

If they're recommending Ubuntu, that is what I would do. If your PC has enough "muscle", Virtualbox would be a good option.. but only if your PC is powerful enough to run two OS's at the same time. If it's not, it just drags down both systems, and becomes very frustrating. How intense is this program you need to use on the CPU? Does it involve 3D? If it involves a lot of 3D type stuff, Virtualbox typically does not handle that very well.

http://ubuntu-manual.org/

That manual is set up for Ubuntu 10.04... but if you want to try 10.10, it will work just fine for it to.

IGF

IndyGunFreak
01-20-2011, 09:13
Anyone have any experience loading Linux on a Dell Inspiron 9100? I have a spare laying around that I can play with. I could also get my hands on a 9300 or 9400if either of those would be better. :dunno:

I'll have to disagree w/ Linux3... My laptop isn't near as powerful as any of those, and it will run Ubuntu just fine.

The 9100 and 9300... I just googled the specs on it, and they both have very old ATI graphics cards, that I'm pretty sure is not well supported by Ubuntu, or the ATI Linux driver you can download/install.

If you can come across a 9400 that has specs similar to this... You'll have very little problems most likely.

Dell 9400
Specs:
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo T7400 (2 GHz, 4 MB Cache, 667 MHz FSB)
Ram: 2GB (2x 1GB) DDR2 SDRam, 533 MHz
Screen: 17 Inch Ultrasharp WUXGA with TrueLife, 1920x1200
Hard Drive: 120GB, 5400 RPM SATA Hard Drive
Video Card: 256MB NVIDIA GeForce Go 7900 GS
Optical drive: 8X DVD+/-RW Drive with Dual Layer Write Capability
Wireless: Intel PRO/Wireless 3945 802.11a/g Mini Card (54Mbps)
Battery: 80WHR 9 Cell Battery
Soundcard: Integrated Sound Blaster Audigy HD Software Edition
OS: Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005
Warranty: 3 Year Accidental Coverage


A couple observations about the 9400(as posted above)
1. The processor is plenty powerful enough
2. 2gigs of Ram is fine
3. Plenty of Hard Drive space
4. I'd have to know more about the sound card, but most likely, it's got an IntelHDA chipset, which should work fine w/ Ubuntu 10.xx
5. Intel Wireless -- Almost always works right out of the box w/ Ubuntu
6. The 7900 works quite well with Ubuntu once you enable the restricted
driver (My sisters computer has a 7900, I have an 8' something on mine)

So in my opinion, if your 9400 is similar to those specs I posted above.... I'd go w/ the 9400.. but if the 9100 or 9300 are your only options, then they should work OK... but the graphics drivers might be a bit of a headache.

gemeinschaft
01-20-2011, 10:51
You could always take the service tag of your machines and enter them on Dell's Product Support site to get the actual configuration and copy/paste them into this thread so you can get opinions on which one would be better to run Ubuntu.

Linux3
01-20-2011, 11:02
I am being forced into the realm of Linux. They are recommending Ubuntu, which I agree with. It is just for one piece of engineering software.
For more information on installing and running Ubuntu Linux I can not stress highly enough that you should go here:
http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu:Maverick

Looks like a lot I know but if nothing else use it as a reference guide.

GIockGuy24
01-20-2011, 14:03
Ubuntu 10.10 32 bit has some slowdown issues. Most noticeable watching choppy video but always there. 64 bit Ubuntu 10.10 has a problem with Adobe Flash Player. Ubuntu 10.04 doesn't have these problems as long as it supports your hardware. For Ubuntu 10.10 you could use the 32 bit version and then install the PAE kernel. The PAE kernel needs to be installed before the 3d video drivers or they have to be uninstalled if they were installed before. Linux Mint does include some firmware that is sometimes needed for certain hardware, mostly wifi cards.Those Dells aren't too old for STI drivers. There are open source drivers and factory ATI drivers and you'll have to find out which ones support the graphics card. ATI drivers are now called AMD drivers because AMD bought ATI. ATI cards usually require kernel 2.6.32 or newer to function 100%.

IndyGunFreak
01-20-2011, 15:03
Ubuntu 10.10 32 bit has some slowdown issues. Most noticeable watching choppy video but always there. 64 bit Ubuntu 10.10 has a problem with Adobe Flash Player. Ubuntu 10.04 doesn't have these problems as long as it supports your hardware. For Ubuntu 10.10 you could use the 32 bit version and then install the PAE kernel. The PAE kernel needs to be installed before the 3d video drivers or they have to be uninstalled if they were installed before. Linux Mint does include some firmware that is sometimes needed for certain hardware, mostly wifi cards.Those Dells aren't too old for STI drivers. There are open source drivers and factory ATI drivers and you'll have to find out which ones support the graphics card. ATI drivers are now called AMD drivers because AMD bought ATI. ATI cards usually require kernel 2.6.32 or newer to function 100%.

I ran 10.10 on my laptop for quite a while, and never had a problem w/ choppy video.

As for the Wifi drivers, all of those are in the ubuntu repositories, and take about 3sec to install.. that incldues the Broadcom b43 driver, STA driver, and the Ralink drivers. Intel and Atheros usually won't be a probem w/ Ubuntu.

IGF

GIockGuy24
01-20-2011, 16:10
I ran 10.10 on my laptop for quite a while, and never had a problem w/ choppy video.

As for the Wifi drivers, all of those are in the ubuntu repositories, and take about 3sec to install.. that incldues the Broadcom b43 driver, STA driver, and the Ralink drivers. Intel and Atheros usually won't be a probem w/ Ubuntu.

IGF

The choppy video is a just a sign of the slowdown. The issue is the standard 32 bit 10.10 kernel runs slower than it should, if you can notice it or not may depend how fast your computer is. The 64 bit version and the 32 bit PAE kernel don't have this problem but 64 bit has a problem with Flash Player. Some (not all) wifi cards need additional firmware installed, in addition to the drivers.

Wolvee
01-20-2011, 16:22
I've been windows and wine free for months now and I couldn't be happier. After getting into EDC & defense lifestyle I was always irritated that I was always under the thumb of costly software and "1984" style technology controlled by MS and Apple. Opensource is the way of the future or we will all be stuck under the thumb.

I run 10.10 on a few machines. It is a bit more to get used to if you have problems but after you figure it out, it just adds to your knowledge base. :0)

Good Luck

Patrick Graham
01-20-2011, 16:39
I am being forced into the realm of Linux. They are recommending Ubuntu, which I agree with. It is just for one piece of engineering software. Everything else will still be run in Win7.

Now the question is do I go dual boot w/ Win7 or VM it? I am thinking VM would be the better option. It just seems safer to me and we should be able to switch back and forth between Win7 and Ubuntu as needed.

Where is the best place to start learning how to run Ubuntu?

I tried it a few years ago but even something as simple as installing a piece of software was impossible for me to grasp. :faint:

I am a PC and I don't like change. :tongueout:

Anyone have any experience loading Linux on a Dell Inspiron 9100? I have a spare laying around that I can play with. I could also get my hands on a 9300 or 9400if either of those would be better. :dunno:

VM or Virtual Box will work if your system has ram and CPU cores you can allocate for the task.

Most expensive engineering apps used to require a dongle, if that's the case you'll need to dual boot.