Installing a new trigger [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Installing a new trigger


brisk21
01-28-2011, 10:16
So, I plan on installing a new, shorter trigger in my Springfield TRP. Is this something you would have a decent reputable gunsmith do, or would you send it to a specific 1911 smith to have done? Or would you do it yourself? I am happy with the trigger action itself, great pull weight, crisp break and reset, I just want a short trigger in there to replace the long one. I never really liked the long triggers on 1911s.

R0CKETMAN
01-28-2011, 10:31
I'm having short triggers installed in two of my 1911's next week. I'm using a 1911 smith.

knedrgr
01-28-2011, 10:42
If you have some mechanical skills, and files, then you can do it. Patients IS the main thing when working on a 1911...it's easier to take off metal than to put it back on.

If it doesn't drop in, you may just need to file down the trigger shoe's height.

Quack
01-28-2011, 10:54
it will need to be fit and all safety checks must be performed. depending on the trigger, the trigger bow may be too long which would reduce pre-travel/take-up to an unsafe level.

here is some basic info on fitting a trigger, but does not address what needs to be done to get the proper pre-travel/take-up if the trigger bow is longer than standard.
http://www.blindhogg.com/gunsmith/triggers.html

probably >90% of the triggers are made by Grieder, which seems to have longer than normal trigger bows. Wilson make's their own triggers, and i haven't seen a problem with them.

Hokie1911
01-28-2011, 10:58
If you have some mechanical skills, and files, then you can do it. Patients IS the main thing when working on a 1911...it's easier to take off metal than to put it back on.

If it doesn't drop in, you may just need to file down the trigger shoe's height.

Patience helps too. :whistling:

Agent6-3/8
01-28-2011, 11:00
Personally, I'd do it myself. (and have several times) It really boils down to your mechanical ability and if you know enough about 1911's to do it safely.

Its really just a matter of fitting the trigger to the frame. Once it is able to smoothly move in an out of the frame, the next step is setting the overtravel. Here is where you need to know what you are doing. Too little and you could damage the sear over time. Too much and it is possible to have your gun go full auto. Some triggers also have adjustable pretravel that will need attention.

knedrgr
01-28-2011, 11:04
Patience helps too. :whistling:

Noun, adjective...

Thanks for the Enwlish lession there professor... :rofl:

Hokie1911
01-28-2011, 11:06
Noun, adjective...

Thanks for the Enwlish lession there professor... :rofl:

I know how much you Asians have probrems with the Engrish ranguage so I ras just hepping a brother out. :tongueout:

brisk21
01-28-2011, 13:11
Yeah, sounds like a job for a gunsmith. Its just alot easier to go to the local gun store with a reputable gunsmith rather than go all the way to Detroit area for a 1911 smith. If you guys can do it, Id hope a decent gunsmith can do it as well. If it was a cheaper 1911, Id dig right in and try it out, but it is a TRP. Those come with "tuned" triggers, so Im not messing with it. I'll post pics when I have the job done.

asiparks
01-28-2011, 13:52
I'm like a drunken monkey with a dremel and I can manage it,... It's not difficult at all, but as others have said, patience is the key, file a bit, fit, file a bit, fit...
I did my Brown in about 40 mins as it needed a fair bit taking off the bottom of the shoe, though none off the top, my Springfield just needed a few stokes off the top and bottom and took about 15 mins. I use either Greider, or more recently John Harrison's smooth triggers, both are very nicely made with good sturdy bows that don't easily bend or warp. The advantage to the Greider is the ability to adjust the overtravel,( and both ways ), if needed once the gun is back together. With the Harrison, you have to dis- assemble the fire group if you need to adjust it and you can only increase it... so again, patience and care is needed....
As long as you can capably function check to make sure it's safely working, the worse you can do is screw up a $25 part, ( which I have done, but it was worth it for the learning....)

Jim S.
01-28-2011, 15:31
Yeah, sounds like a job for a gunsmith.

It really is an easy job. Buy a good quality trigger and all you have to do at most is fit it top and bottom to your frame.
A little work on a flat surface with some fine sandpaper and in it goes.
Many just go right in without fitting.
It won't effect your trigger pull weight at all and adjusting the overtravel screw is easy too.
Don't be afraid of this, it is probably the easiest thing you'll ever do to a 1911.
Have you ever taken your gun apart?
Time to learn and do this job yourself.
You'll be glad you did.

brisk21
01-28-2011, 15:50
It really is an easy job. Buy a good quality trigger and all you have to do at most is fit it top and bottom to your frame.
A little work on a flat surface with some fine sandpaper and in it goes.
Many just go right in without fitting.
It won't effect your trigger pull weight at all and adjusting the overtravel screw is easy too.
Don't be afraid of this, it is probably the easiest thing you'll ever do to a 1911.
Have you ever taken your gun apart?
Time to learn and do this job yourself.
You'll be glad you did.



Well maybe your right. Ill order the part and tear the gun apart and see how it goes. That's the best way to learn anyway, right?

Jim S.
01-28-2011, 16:21
Well maybe your right. Ill order the part and tear the gun apart and see how it goes. That's the best way to learn anyway, right?

Absolutely. It is really an easy job.
You'll have fun doing it and you will gain confidence in your ability to work on your own gun.
You have to start somewhere.
When you get ready to do it send me a PM and I can walk you through it step by step.

Greyhoundman
01-28-2011, 18:01
Take a look here before you jump in head first. http://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=276094

brisk21
01-28-2011, 18:27
Absolutely. It is really an easy job.
You'll have fun doing it and you will gain confidence in your ability to work on your own gun.
You have to start somewhere.
When you get ready to do it send me a PM and I can walk you through it step by step.

Wow, thanks bud ill definately do that!

brisk21
01-28-2011, 23:18
Well, I just completely disassembled and reassembled the 1911. It really wasn't that bad with the help from youtube. Now that I know I can do that, I guess I'll order the trigger, see what happens.

Jim S.
01-29-2011, 12:16
Take a look at Brownells.
I like the Harrison Extreme Service triggers.
Good quality and the overtravel screw is in the back of the trigger so it maintains the traditional look.
Used them several times and always happy with them.

brisk21
01-29-2011, 15:46
I ordered the STI short curve nylon trigger. I wanted that one specifically. It worries me though, because the trigger bow looks a bit different in the photo than a regular trigger bow. It has cuts in it as well as tabs towards the rear. Hopefully it will work. If not, I'll just get a regular short trigger.

2TheRange
01-29-2011, 15:50
This is very long but very enlightening. It definitely answers that question for me. Other may very well have the skills and tools...I wish I did. It's still very informative no matter what kind of gun is being worked on. :supergrin:


Part I
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCF2u3K743A

Part II
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-uHeePP1CY&feature=relmfu

knedrgr
01-29-2011, 15:54
the STI trigger bow is thinner than the regular bow, therefore those tabs are there to give it the regular thickness to the frame's rail. Those cut tabs, near the shoe, are there to set pre-travel distance.

Quack
01-29-2011, 15:56
This is very long but very enlightening. It definitely answers that question for me. Other may very well have the skills and tools...I wish I did. It's still very informative no matter what kind of gun is being worked on. :supergrin:


Part I
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCF2u3K743A

Part II
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-uHeePP1CY&feature=relmfu

That's the wrong way to do things. What you don't see is the follow up video where butnfancy says that they put the old parts back in because it had hammer follow.


Edit: here's the video and it about 1/2 way through the review.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GlMGVYl4wY

knedrgr
01-29-2011, 16:01
This is very long but very enlightening. It definitely answers that question for me. Other may very well have the skills and tools...I wish I did. It's still very informative no matter what kind of gun is being worked on. :supergrin:


Part I
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCF2u3K743A

Part II
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-uHeePP1CY&feature=relmfu



:rofl:

Gunsmith advice from NutnFancy and Terry G... :upeyes:

brisk21
01-29-2011, 16:02
Oh, ok. I ordered it last night. I'll update the thread when and if I get the trigger installed properly. I know I can fit the trigger to the frame. That will be no problem. I just hope the trigger bow is the correct length.

GeorgiaRedfish
01-29-2011, 16:08
Oh, ok. I ordered it last night. I'll update the thread when and if I get the trigger installed properly. I know I can fit the trigger to the frame. That will be no problem. I just hope the trigger bow is the correct length.
I just bought me a new trigger too, and this will be a learning experience for me as well. Plus it came with a free flat MSH, but it's plastic. I'll install it anyway to get rid of the Springer's ILS. Good luck man

Quack
01-29-2011, 16:09
The STI trigger will be fine since it has take up tabs. Haven't heard of any problems with them.

knedrgr
01-29-2011, 16:10
I just bought me a new trigger too, and this will be a learning experience for me as well. Plus it came with a free flat MSH, but it's plastic. I'll install it anyway to get rid of the Springer's ILS. Good luck man

keep the SA MSH, but change out the internals...you'll like it better than a plastic MSH. YMMV.

GeorgiaRedfish
01-29-2011, 16:15
keep the SA MSH, but change out the internals...you'll like it better than a plastic MSH. YMMV.
Well my springer has an arched mainspring housing. I did some research on the Polymer ones and the only one's I hear problems about are Kimber's, the one I am getting are Colt factory ones. I haven't read anyone disliking them, I'll put it on until I can get a nice checkered flat one. OR if I end up not liking the Polymer I can always switch back.

2TheRange
01-29-2011, 16:16
Obviously my noobie-ness shows. I still learned from it but have a lot TO learn.

brisk21
01-29-2011, 16:25
The STI trigger will be fine since it has take up tabs. Haven't heard of any problems with them.


Good. I wish I would have known about Springfields non-captured main-spring housing and how to keep it together with the little tool. Oh well, I got it now so when I take the gun apart to install the trigger I won't have to struggle to hold the housing in place while I slip the pin in. That was a bit of a p.i.t.a.!!!

Quack
01-29-2011, 16:33
Did you replace the MSH or the internals? If not, then don't use a MS cap pin with the ILS internals (MS & MS cap)

GeorgiaRedfish
01-29-2011, 16:39
Did you replace the MSH or the internals? If not, then don't use a MS cap pin with the ILS internals (MS & MS cap)
You can get all the internal replacement parts from wilson combat for 6+ shipping I believe.

ctfireman
01-29-2011, 18:29
If you can strip a 1911 completely & feel comfortable then have at it!

knedrgr
01-29-2011, 19:02
Well my springer has an arched mainspring housing. I did some research on the Polymer ones and the only one's I hear problems about are Kimber's, the one I am getting are Colt factory ones. I haven't read anyone disliking them, I'll put it on until I can get a nice checkered flat one. OR if I end up not liking the Polymer I can always switch back.

Yes, the arched MSH sucks, at least for me.

Here's a Wilson aluminum flat, checked, MSH on sale...

http://shopwilsoncombat.com/1911-Accessories/products/241/

Putting plastic on a 1911 is just a sin. JMB is turning in his grave...

GeorgiaRedfish
01-29-2011, 20:02
Yes, the arched MSH sucks, at least for me.

Here's a Wilson aluminum flat, checked, MSH on sale...

http://shopwilsoncombat.com/1911-Accessories/products/241/

Putting plastic on a 1911 is just a sin. JMB is turning in his grave...
Well than every manufature of 1911s is making him too, with novaks, polymer triggers, colt's polymer msh, aluminum triggers and msh, etc....Plus the one in the add is bare aluminum I'm stick with all black.

brisk21
02-03-2011, 12:03
Ok. I installed the trigger. It "dropped in" just fine. It functions properly. BUT, the trigger has some "slack" in the rested position. It will move foreward and backward about 1/8 of an inch. I believe that it is because the triggerbow is just a little bit shorter than the stock one, which is what I was afraid of. I don't think I can correct this myself. I may take it to a gunsmith and let him try. Here is a link to my youtube of a video that shows what is happening. Give me some suggestions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ez-OIHaRn3k

knedrgr
02-03-2011, 12:15
post a picture of the bow and frame.

Might need to set the pre-travel to take up the slack.

GeorgiaRedfish
02-03-2011, 12:17
A Quack trigger could have prevented this!


Just kidding intelligent people will be along shortly to help.

brisk21
02-03-2011, 12:18
Yeah that was my next question. The overtravel screw in the new trigger needs a smaller allenwrench. I have to run to the hardware store and get one because the small one I have for the stock trigger is too large. I was wondering if I just had to set the overtravel screw in a bit. How do you set the pre travel?

knedrgr
02-03-2011, 12:37
the pre-travel are tabs that were cut into the curve part of the bow, near the shoe. You can bend those out, toward the shoe, so it will hit the frame, thus taking up the slack that you're seeing. Make sure it doesn't take up too much slack and prevent the trigger to completely reset. Do the hammer follow-thru test to make sure the reset point is good.

brisk21
02-03-2011, 12:40
the pre-travel are tabs that were cut into the curve part of the bow, near the shoe. You can bend those out, toward the shoe, so it will hit the frame, thus taking up the slack that you're seeing. Make sure it doesn't take up too much slack and prevent the trigger to completely reset. Do the hammer follow-thru test to make sure the reset point is good.


Ok, thanks. I'll disassemble and try it and get back to you guys. Thanks!!

brisk21
02-03-2011, 13:08
Well, I did it! I adjusted the pre-travel and reinstalled. It is perfect! I left a hair of pre-travel in for safety, and I will do a full function and fire test at the range, but it seems to function perfectly with dry fire. I really appriciate all the help guys! I couldn't have done it without you. I know MUCH more about the 1911 now, but still have much to learn. Again, thanks everyone!! Here are some links to the finished job. I'll post more if it doesn't function properly.

http://i542.photobucket.com/albums/gg428/benrisk21/2011-02-03_14-02-02_312.jpg

http://i542.photobucket.com/albums/gg428/benrisk21/2011-02-03_14-01-01_960.jpg

http://i542.photobucket.com/albums/gg428/benrisk21/2011-02-03_14-00-53_663.jpg

knedrgr
02-03-2011, 13:20
glad to hear it! Looks good BTW.

if it hasn't already been done, make sure to use some blue loctite on the overtravel screw to keep it secure.

knedrgr
02-03-2011, 13:20
Now lets bobtail that TRP...custom! :rofl:

brisk21
02-03-2011, 13:25
glad to hear it! Looks good BTW.

if it hasn't already been done, make sure to use some blue loctite on the overtravel screw to keep it secure.

Now lets bobtail that TRP...custom! :rofl:


Yup, I'll get that loctite done.

Bobtail? I just threw up in my mouth a little bit.:rofl: I wont be buying any micrometers or anything any time soon!! I'll leave the real gunsmithing to a real gunsmith.