tritium sites in sub zero weather [Archive] - Glock Talk

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smorin2
01-31-2011, 12:50
Hello,this may have been discussed before(did'nt find anything) but does anyone here know if tritium capsules would freeze and rupture in extended -0 weather? I sometimes have to leave my G27 for extended periods(9 hours +/-) in a lock box under my jeep seat.The past few weeks here we have had a few bitterly cold days and i am worried about damaging the sites.The reason i ask is i'm not sure if the tritium is a solid or liquid and assuming it's a liquid i would think it would have the potential to expand and crack the vial.If anyone has any information on this subject it would be greatly appreciated.Thanks.

repolady
01-31-2011, 12:55
Its 22 Degrees here right no I'm putting the 29 outside now I'll leave it out overnight and let you know in the morning (supposed to be aroud 14-16 out tonight)



I really am doing this because I kinda wonder too. I always have my G29 with me when I hunt and it gets plum COLD out I haven't had any issues but the gun is usually under a coat and against my body (aside from a layer of under armour between us)

Glock4President
01-31-2011, 12:55
No I don't think so. The police use them in sub zero temperatures all the time.

Captains1911
01-31-2011, 12:56
Hello,this may have been discussed before(did'nt find anything) but does anyone here know if tritium capsules would freeze and rupture in extended -0 weather? I sometimes have to leave my G27 for extended periods(9 hours +/-) in a lock box under my jeep seat.The past few weeks here we have had a few bitterly cold days and i am worried about damaging the sites.The reason i ask is i'm not sure if the tritium is a solid or liquid and assuming it's a liquid i would think it would have the potential to expand and crack the vial.If anyone has any information on this subject it would be greatly appreciated.Thanks.

Tritium is neither solid nor liquid, it is a GAS. I think you're fine.

smorin2
01-31-2011, 13:01
Thank you Captains1911,i had never considered it as a gaseous form.Appreciate the help!

quinnt
01-31-2011, 14:05
Tritium is neither solid nor liquid, it is a GAS. I think you're fine.

A room temperature gas turns to a liquid and a solid at a certain temperature:supergrin:

But yes you should be fine.

G26S239
01-31-2011, 15:12
Radioactive decay is not affected by the temps found on Earth.

chini42
01-31-2011, 15:19
For the past 2 years mine has been locked up in a vehicle for 12+hrs a day, 5-6 days a week in Michigan winters. I haven't had a problem yet.

Captains1911
01-31-2011, 16:50
A room temperature gas turns to a liquid and a solid at a certain temperature:supergrin:

But yes you should be fine.

So according to you, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, helium, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, AIR etc., etc., etc. turns to liquid at room temperature...

Sonnytoo
01-31-2011, 17:11
Night-sights are glass "lamps", filled with pressurized tritium GAS and cushioned in a bed of silicon rubber to prevent damage from shock.
Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen, is radioactive with a half-life of about 12.2 yrs. It glows because it is a radioactive gas. You don't have to worry about heat or cold.
12.2 years from now, your sights will still be 1/2 as bright as they are today.
24.4 years from now, your sights will still be 1/4 as bright as they are today.
After 1024 years from now (1/2 to the 10th power), they will still have a dim glow, although you won't be around to see it.
Here is a link to Trijicon which shows the construction of these lamps.
http://www.trijicon.com/na_en/products/product1.php?id=BNTNS
S2
p.s. Physics and math can be fun.

orion814me
01-31-2011, 17:19
The boiling point of tritium is -415 degrees F. You should be fine as long as your jeep is parked on this planet. BTW its half life is 12.26 years.

Edit.
Looks like Sonnytoo beat me to it with the science facts.

MrVvrroomm
01-31-2011, 18:46
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y148/MrVvrroomm/SmartCar/IMG_0596.jpg

NO!

mr_fender
01-31-2011, 19:04
A room temperature gas turns to a liquid and a solid at a certain temperature:supergrin:

But yes you should be fine.

Not always. Some compounds go directly from solid to gas. It's called sublimation. Dry Ice is one example. :tongueout:

PrO...
01-31-2011, 19:37
Its 22 Degrees here right no I'm putting the 29 outside now I'll leave it out overnight and let you know in the morning (supposed to be aroud 14-16 out tonight)



I really am doing this because I kinda wonder too. I always have my G29 with me when I hunt and it gets plum COLD out I haven't had any issues but the gun is usually under a coat and against my body (aside from a layer of under armour between us)
Where outside? :supergrin:

G26S239
01-31-2011, 20:45
Not always. Some compounds go directly from solid to gas. It's called sublimation. Dry Ice is one example. :tongueout:
And, as a result, dry ice sights have fallen out of favor. :supergrin:

Foxtrotx1
01-31-2011, 20:55
Hoooo k heres the dealio on za treeetium! ez gas at schtandard tempeture und pressure!

file:///Users/TrevFox/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/moz-screenshot.png

janice6
01-31-2011, 21:11
I live in Minnesota. my whole extended family uses them without a problem.

rca256
01-31-2011, 21:22
If you get it down below -252.8 C, it will change from a gas to a liquid.

Lateral Forces
01-31-2011, 21:30
I thought they filled the vials with Tritiated water. Could be wrong though.

DustyJacket
01-31-2011, 22:10
After 1024 years from now (1/2 to the 10th power), they will still have a dim glow, although you won't be around to see it.

Sez who ? :supergrin:

rem2429
01-31-2011, 22:20
To me the question would be-
Do repeated fluctuations in temperature cause pressure problems that might cause the lamps integrity to be compromised?
PV=nRT anyone?

Foxtrotx1
02-01-2011, 00:39
I thought they filled the vials with Tritiated water. Could be wrong though.

It's a gas. Most likely chosen over water due to the fact that it could freeze and the water would absorb some of the radiation making it less effective.

DJ Niner
02-01-2011, 00:52
To me the question would be-
Do repeated fluctuations in temperature cause pressure problems that might cause the lamps integrity to be compromised?
PV=nRT anyone?Not likely, based on my limited experience. I kept a night-sighted Glock in my car up in Alaska for several winters; the static temperatures varied from as cold as -35 F to about +75 F (I ran the heater hot during my commute) twice a day. I shot it at 20 to 25 below zero a couple of times, just took it out of the car and shot it (I worked on a firing range). No problems at all.

I was still using that Glock more than 10 years later; the sights had dimmed with age, but still worked fine.

smorin2
02-01-2011, 12:16
Thank you to all who took the time to respond.I see a fellow GTer has the kind of cold i was referring to judging by that dashboard pic.:)As far as a jeeps half life being 12 years,well it'd be nice if it lasts 12 years.That calcium chloride they put on the roads up here is rough on the brake lines and frame.